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Juan Bosch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Bosch, a former president of the Dominican Republic whose name is forever linked to the U.S. invasion of that island nation in 1965, died Thursday in Santo Domingo after a long hospitalization. He was 92. A self-educated author of about 40 books and founder of two of the nation's three political parties, Bosch exerted an influence as a reformer on a generation of Caribbean politicians that extended far beyond his short time as president.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Bosch, a former president of the Dominican Republic whose name is forever linked to the U.S. invasion of that island nation in 1965, died Thursday in Santo Domingo after a long hospitalization. He was 92. A self-educated author of about 40 books and founder of two of the nation's three political parties, Bosch exerted an influence as a reformer on a generation of Caribbean politicians that extended far beyond his short time as president.
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NEWS
May 18, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blind, 83-year-old President Joaquin Balaguer held a narrow lead late Thursday over his 80-year-old rival, Juan Bosch, but private pollsters cautioned that the vote was so close it could go either way by this morning. With more than half of the country's 7,000 polling places reporting, the independent Central Electoral Board said Balaguer was leading with 386,766 votes--or 34.9%--to Bosch's 375,869--or 33.9%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996
The July 4 editorial proclaimed, "New Era for Dominican Republic: A clean election marks the end of Balaguer's long dominance." Really? Everyone agrees this was a clean and fair election. But the party of the newly elected president, Leonel Fernandez, a lawyer raised in New York City, has only one seat in the 30-member Dominican Senate, and 12 out of 120 representatives in the Chamber of Deputies. Control of the Congress remains where it has been for four decades: in the hands of Joaquin Balaguer and his alter ego and fellow octogenarian, Juan Bosch.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Just a few days after announcing that he was quitting politics and his political party for good, former Dominican Republic President Juan Bosch changed his mind. In a televised speech, Bosch, 82, said at the request of supporters he was taking back his resignation from the center-left Dominican Liberation Party, which he founded in 1973 after splitting off from another party he had founded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996
The July 4 editorial proclaimed, "New Era for Dominican Republic: A clean election marks the end of Balaguer's long dominance." Really? Everyone agrees this was a clean and fair election. But the party of the newly elected president, Leonel Fernandez, a lawyer raised in New York City, has only one seat in the 30-member Dominican Senate, and 12 out of 120 representatives in the Chamber of Deputies. Control of the Congress remains where it has been for four decades: in the hands of Joaquin Balaguer and his alter ego and fellow octogenarian, Juan Bosch.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Joaquin Balaguer, a conservative historian and poet, was sworn in as president of this Caribbean island republic for the fifth time Saturday with a pledge to fight poverty and official corruption. Balaguer, who first served as president in the early 1960s by appointment of longtime Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, accepted the presidential sash again just two weeks short of his 79th birthday, denouncing the Trujillo Era as "30 years of darkness." Trujillo was assassinated in 1961.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dominican voters crowded the polls Wednesday in a peaceful election to choose one of two octogenarians to lead this economically hard-pressed country for the next four years. The presidential race appeared to be a toss-up between the incumbent conservative President Joaquin Balaguer, 83, and leftist former President Juan Bosch, 80, facing one another at the polls for the fifth time in the last quarter century.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Jimmy Carter successfully brokered a recount in the Dominican Republic's disputed presidential election before the first vote count even ended Friday, forestalling a potentially violent confrontation between the government and a candidate who appeared to be losing.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Joaquin Balaguer, 83, won last month's election by fewer than 25,000 votes over challenger Juan Bosch, the Central Electoral Board announced in Santo Domingo. The board issued its final count for the May 16 election, giving Balaguer 35.7% to 34.4% for Bosch. The outcome had been left hanging when the board suspended counting to review tally sheets.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Just a few days after announcing that he was quitting politics and his political party for good, former Dominican Republic President Juan Bosch changed his mind. In a televised speech, Bosch, 82, said at the request of supporters he was taking back his resignation from the center-left Dominican Liberation Party, which he founded in 1973 after splitting off from another party he had founded.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Jimmy Carter successfully brokered a recount in the Dominican Republic's disputed presidential election before the first vote count even ended Friday, forestalling a potentially violent confrontation between the government and a candidate who appeared to be losing.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blind, 83-year-old President Joaquin Balaguer held a narrow lead late Thursday over his 80-year-old rival, Juan Bosch, but private pollsters cautioned that the vote was so close it could go either way by this morning. With more than half of the country's 7,000 polling places reporting, the independent Central Electoral Board said Balaguer was leading with 386,766 votes--or 34.9%--to Bosch's 375,869--or 33.9%.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dominican voters crowded the polls Wednesday in a peaceful election to choose one of two octogenarians to lead this economically hard-pressed country for the next four years. The presidential race appeared to be a toss-up between the incumbent conservative President Joaquin Balaguer, 83, and leftist former President Juan Bosch, 80, facing one another at the polls for the fifth time in the last quarter century.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Joaquin Balaguer, a conservative historian and poet, was sworn in as president of this Caribbean island republic for the fifth time Saturday with a pledge to fight poverty and official corruption. Balaguer, who first served as president in the early 1960s by appointment of longtime Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, accepted the presidential sash again just two weeks short of his 79th birthday, denouncing the Trujillo Era as "30 years of darkness." Trujillo was assassinated in 1961.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | Associated Press
President Joaquin Balaguer, beginning his sixth term in office Thursday, defended his austerity plan, which touched off deadly protests this week. The nationwide strike Monday and Tuesday brought this Caribbean nation of 7 million people to a near-standstill. Clashes between protesters and security forces left at least 11 dead and 50 wounded. Police arrested 2,000 protesters. At his inauguration Thursday, Balaguer said the program that prompted the protests is necessary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1998
Jose Francisco Pena Gomez, 61, whose advocacy for the poor helped prompt a U.S. invasion of the Dominican Republic. Born to Haitian immigrants, the black future politician was adopted by a Dominican family and earned a doctorate in law at the University of Santo Domingo. Pena Gomez made his name in 1965 by going on radio and inciting a popular uprising over the ouster of leftist leader Juan Bosch. President Lyndon B. Johnson sent 23,000 Marines to prevent a Cuban-style revolution. With U.S.
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