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Juan Carlos Fresnadillo

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2002 | Sorina Diaconescu, Special to The Times
It is said that filmmaking often is a form of therapy. In the case of Spanish-born filmmaker Juan Carlos Fresnadillo, it has been more like an exorcism. Ever since he witnessed, as an impressionable 9-year-old, two jets colliding on the runway in his hometown of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Fresnadillo has been consumed by a fascination with the intertwined concepts of fate, life and death.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2007 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
IN Madrid on a Friday night in the summer of 2003, a Spanish film director went to an English horror film out of the basic human need to see some zombies. Yet as Juan Carlos Fresnadillo took in Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later," he felt blown away to an extent zombies alone seldom muster. He and film editor Nacho Ruiz Capillas emerged from the cinema onto quiet streets and began imagining how Madrid might look if some raging virus left it depopulated, like London in the movie. They went for drinks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2007 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
IN Madrid on a Friday night in the summer of 2003, a Spanish film director went to an English horror film out of the basic human need to see some zombies. Yet as Juan Carlos Fresnadillo took in Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later," he felt blown away to an extent zombies alone seldom muster. He and film editor Nacho Ruiz Capillas emerged from the cinema onto quiet streets and began imagining how Madrid might look if some raging virus left it depopulated, like London in the movie. They went for drinks.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2002 | Sorina Diaconescu, Special to The Times
It is said that filmmaking often is a form of therapy. In the case of Spanish-born filmmaker Juan Carlos Fresnadillo, it has been more like an exorcism. Ever since he witnessed, as an impressionable 9-year-old, two jets colliding on the runway in his hometown of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Fresnadillo has been consumed by a fascination with the intertwined concepts of fate, life and death.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2002 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Everyone knows what it is to be lucky, but what exactly does being lucky mean? Is it simply a matter of chance or are there other factors, as unusual and unnerving as they are unknown, clandestinely at work? What if, just for argument's sake, luck was something quantifiable, a commodity that could be traded, gambled away, even stolen. What if luck were a gift that could be discovered and maximized or, just as easily, deactivated. What if good luck for you meant bad luck for someone else.
NEWS
May 10, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
IN "28 Weeks Later," inhabitants of London become infected with a deadly virus that turns them into rage-filled killers, running helter-skelter through the empty streets like wild animals in search of human prey they can attack. But there is a method to the infected madness: All the actions, movements and vicious attitude of the crazed people were carefully choreographed and rehearsed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
In a bucolic, Beatrix Potter cottage turned fortified makeshift bunker, Don (Robert Carlyle) and Alice (Catherine McCormack) are just sitting down to a pasta dinner with four other survivors of the viral outbreak that ravaged England in Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later" when their party is crashed by a raging zombie horde. You wonder: Wasn't this mess already cleared up? In fact, it was -- briefly, anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Unfortunately, the success of the Oscar-winning dancing penguin animated hit "Happy Feet" overshadowed the release this summer of "Surf's Up" (Sony, $29), a clever, beautifully rendered 3-D animated comedy about a young Rockhopper penguin (Shia LaBeouf) who leaves his home in Antarctica to participate in a surf-off on the exotic Pen Gu Island.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1997
Picture: "The English Patient," Saul Zaentz, producer; "Fargo," Ethan Coen, producer; "Jerry Maguire," James L. Brooks, Laurence Mark, Richard Sakai and Cameron Crowe, producers; "Secrets & Lies," Simon Channing-Williams, producer; "Shine," Jane Scott, producer. * Actor: Tom Cruise, "Jerry Maguire"; Ralph Fiennes, "The English Patient"; Woody Harrelson, "The People vs. Larry Flynt"; Geoffrey Rush, "Shine"; Billy Bob Thornton, "Sling Blade."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1997
Make your own choices by marking the boxes in one column and use the boxes in the other column to note the actual winner. * PICTURE The English Patient Fargo Jerry Maguire Secrets & Lies Shine * ACTRESS Brenda Blethyn Secrets & Lies Diane Keaton Marvin's Room Frances McDormand Fargo Kristin Scott Thomas The English Patient Emily Watson Breaking the Waves * ACTOR Tom Cruise Jerry Maguire Ralph Fiennes The English Patient Woody Harrelson The People vs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1997 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a television pilot, "Dear Diary" never made it to prime time. As a film, however, it is up for an Academy Award. The irony is not lost on writer-director David Frankel, who saw his 22-minute urban comedy turned down by ABC only to then see it nominated for best live-action short film by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. "We're probably the first TV pilot ever to get nominated [for an Oscar], and I wouldn't be surprised that we're the last," Frankel said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2011 | John Horn and Nicole Sperling
Visitors to next week's Toronto International Film Festival can take a break by visiting the city's fantastic Hockey Hall of Fame. But there should be no shortage of elbowing, body checks and brawling in the festival's theaters, where an unusually large number of high-profile movies will be fighting for distribution deals. The Cannes and Sundance cinematic gatherings may attract more media attention as sales markets, but Toronto delivers a steady stream of significant deals for films financed outside the studio system; in the last few years Toronto has yielded distribution pacts for "The Hurt Locker," "The Wrestler" and "The Visitor.
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