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Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia

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April 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A reputed Colombian drug lord whose cartel is accused of shipping hundreds of tons of cocaine to the United States was sentenced to more than 30 years in prison in Brazil for crimes in that country. Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia was found guilty of money laundering, corruption, conspiracy and use of false documents. He must also pay a $2.5-million fine, and he might still be extradited to the United States. Ramirez Abadia is reputedly a leader of Colombia's Norte del Valle cartel.
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WORLD
August 23, 2008 | Marcelo Soares and Patrick J. McDonnell, Special to The Times
A former Colombian drug kingpin who had plastic surgery to conceal his identity and lived luxuriously in Brazil before being arrested here last year was extradited Friday to the United States, Brazilian and U.S. authorities said. Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia, who had been imprisoned for money laundering in Brazil, was handed over to U.S. agents in the Amazonian city of Manaus and flown to New York, the Brazilian Justice Ministry said. Ramirez Abadia, known as "El Chupeta" (Lollipop)
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WORLD
January 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A Brazilian judge rejected an alleged drug lord's offer to hand over tens of millions of dollars in exchange for a quick extradition to the United States. Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia had proposed to tell authorities where he has hidden $30 million to $40 million in return for avoiding a prison term in Brazil, for his wife's release from jail and for speedy extradition, federal prosecutor Thamea Danelon said. Ramirez Abadia also said he would give U.S. authorities information on three accomplices abroad and one in Brazil.
WORLD
April 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A reputed Colombian drug lord whose cartel is accused of shipping hundreds of tons of cocaine to the United States was sentenced to more than 30 years in prison in Brazil for crimes in that country. Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia was found guilty of money laundering, corruption, conspiracy and use of false documents. He must also pay a $2.5-million fine, and he might still be extradited to the United States. Ramirez Abadia is reputedly a leader of Colombia's Norte del Valle cartel.
WORLD
August 23, 2008 | Marcelo Soares and Patrick J. McDonnell, Special to The Times
A former Colombian drug kingpin who had plastic surgery to conceal his identity and lived luxuriously in Brazil before being arrested here last year was extradited Friday to the United States, Brazilian and U.S. authorities said. Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia, who had been imprisoned for money laundering in Brazil, was handed over to U.S. agents in the Amazonian city of Manaus and flown to New York, the Brazilian Justice Ministry said. Ramirez Abadia, known as "El Chupeta" (Lollipop)
WORLD
August 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A reputed leader of Colombia's biggest drug cartel radically altered his face with repeated plastic surgeries. But U.S. agents identified Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia, who was arrested Tuesday, using the equivalent of a vocal fingerprint, his attorney said in Sao Paulo, Brazil Brazilian police taped Ramirez Abadia's phone conversations, said lawyer Sergio Alambert. Colombian officials provided a recording of Ramirez Abadia, and both sets of recordings were passed to the U.S.
WORLD
April 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Armed men firing from pickup trucks and flying in a helicopter attacked a maximum-security prison holding some of Brazil's highest-profile inmates but were repelled by guards, authorities said. No inmates escaped. The federal prison attacked late Sunday houses Colombian drug lord Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia and Brazilian gang leader Luiz Fernando da Costa -- and officials were investigating whether the gunmen were trying to free either of them. The helicopter never landed, according to a Justice Ministry spokesman who declined to give his name.
WORLD
November 21, 2008 | Chris Kraul, Kraul is a Times staff writer.
The president of a failed Colombian financial services firm suspected of laundering drug profits and bilking thousands of mostly poor investors of millions of dollars has been arrested in Panama and deported, officials said Thursday. David Murcia Guzman, 28, founder of the DMG financial services firm, was detained Wednesday night near Panama City as he prepared to flee to Costa Rica, where there is no extradition treaty with Colombia, Colombian national police chief Oscar Naranjo told reporters.
WORLD
February 2, 2008 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Authorities in Venezuela said Friday that Wilber Varela, the leader of Colombia's Norte del Valle drug cartel, had been found shot to death in the Venezuelan resort town of Merida. The location of the killing underscores the evolution of drug trafficking in the region. Increasing amounts of Colombian cocaine destined for U.S. and European markets flow through Venezuela, and as much as one-third of all the narcotic powder is now thought to transit there.
WORLD
September 13, 2007 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
U.S. officials hailed the capture this week of a man alleged to be Colombia's most powerful drug lord, saying the arrest will at least disrupt trafficking and could set off a divisive power struggle among cartel leaders. The officials and some experts hastened to add that the arrest Monday of Diego Montoya wasn't likely to significantly reduce the flow of drugs to North America, given U.S. demand for cocaine and the willingness of lesser capos to fill the leadership vacuum.
WORLD
January 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A Brazilian judge rejected an alleged drug lord's offer to hand over tens of millions of dollars in exchange for a quick extradition to the United States. Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia had proposed to tell authorities where he has hidden $30 million to $40 million in return for avoiding a prison term in Brazil, for his wife's release from jail and for speedy extradition, federal prosecutor Thamea Danelon said. Ramirez Abadia also said he would give U.S. authorities information on three accomplices abroad and one in Brazil.
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