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Juan Crespi

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1997 | STEVE PADILLA
Twenty-eight years before another Franciscan priest would found the Mission San Fernando, a short, pale missionary named Juan Crespi recorded the first impressions Europeans had of what was to become the San Fernando Valley. In his journal, Crespi described a "vastly lush" valley, studded with oaks and sycamores, that he accurately predicted would make a good spot to build a town. Crespi was one of two Franciscans accompanying 61 Spanish soldiers on an expedition in search of Monterey Bay.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1997 | STEVE PADILLA
Twenty-eight years before another Franciscan priest would found the Mission San Fernando, a short, pale missionary named Juan Crespi recorded the first impressions Europeans had of what was to become the San Fernando Valley. In his journal, Crespi described a "vastly lush" valley, studded with oaks and sycamores, that he accurately predicted would make a good spot to build a town. Crespi was one of two Franciscans accompanying 61 Spanish soldiers on an expedition in search of Monterey Bay.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 5, 1769, a short, pale Franciscan missionary named Juan Crespi looked northward from about where Mulholland Drive now spans the San Diego Freeway, across the San Fernando Valley, then a trackless bowl of wild grass dotted here and there with oak and sycamore trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since it was written in 1769, the journal in which Juan Crespi jotted down his impressions of unexplored California has seemed condemned to obscurity. Although Crespi is famous for keeping a diary detailing the first European expedition through California, little of what he wrote on his 2,600-mile trek is known.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since it was written in 1769, the journal in which Juan Crespi jotted down his impressions of unexplored California has seemed condemned to obscurity. Although Crespi is famous for keeping a diary detailing the first European expedition through California, little of what he wrote on his 2,600-mile trek is known.
NEWS
November 14, 1985 | DICK RORABACK, Times Staff Writer
1ST STREET VIADUCT, LOS ANGELES, to GLENDALE BOULEVARD BRIDGE, ATWATER GLEN A potato, a pine tree and a pack of Camels. Memories are made of this. There's not much left of the old Los Angeles now, the one Gaspar de Portola and his jolly friars--Juan Crespi and Francisco Gomez--chanced upon on their way to close escrow on Alta California for the King of Spain. Not much left of the old Porciuncula River, either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2005 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
The name of the game is historical accuracy. Everyone agrees on that. What historians cannot agree on is the name given to Los Angeles when its Spanish founders formed it Sept. 4, 1781. The early settlers meant to name the town after angels; that much is known. But for more than 75 years, local historians have been quarreling over its actual moniker. Some contend it was El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora de los Angeles. Others assert it was El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reyna de los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1997 | STEVE PADILLA
One could say Gaspar de Portola put the San Fernando Valley on the map. After all, he was the first European to find it. Portola, governor of Baja California, led an expedition of 61 Spanish soldiers and two Franciscan missionaries to find Monterey Bay in 1769. On Aug. 5, they reached the top of the Sepulveda Pass and looked down on a rich valley. Portola had left San Diego on July 14 and hoped to rediscover Monterey Bay as a way to check Russian expansion in Northern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1995
The first European exploration of what is now Orange County took place in 1769, led by Spanish captain Gaspar de Portola. A journal kept by Father Juan Crespi, a member of the Portola expedition, shows the soldiers and priests marched into the territory that now forms the southern tip of Orange County on July 22, 1769. The Spaniards made a campsite by a stream near the canyon known today as Los Cristianitos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1994 | Written and researched by Stephanie Stassel / Los Angeles Times
July is a time to remember how the Founding Fathers gathered in Philadelphia in 1776 to sign the Declaration of Independence. But what was going on in Southern California? From an East Coast perspective, not much. Still, the 1770s were an important decade in the history of the region, a time when Spanish explorers made some of their first expeditions in what eventually became Los Angeles. Progress was gradual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 5, 1769, a short, pale Franciscan missionary named Juan Crespi looked northward from about where Mulholland Drive now spans the San Diego Freeway, across the San Fernando Valley, then a trackless bowl of wild grass dotted here and there with oak and sycamore trees.
NEWS
November 14, 1985 | DICK RORABACK, Times Staff Writer
1ST STREET VIADUCT, LOS ANGELES, to GLENDALE BOULEVARD BRIDGE, ATWATER GLEN A potato, a pine tree and a pack of Camels. Memories are made of this. There's not much left of the old Los Angeles now, the one Gaspar de Portola and his jolly friars--Juan Crespi and Francisco Gomez--chanced upon on their way to close escrow on Alta California for the King of Spain. Not much left of the old Porciuncula River, either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989 | Researched by Susan Davis Greene
Listed below are some of the notable earthquakes that have been centered in Orange County. Dec. 17, 1988: A mild earthquake measuring 3.4 on the Richter scale, centered in the Pacific Ocean south of Seal Beach, shook parts of Southern California, but no damage or injuries were reported in Orange County. Nov. 19, 1988: A moderate earthquake in the Pacific Ocean off Huntington Beach rumbled through Orange and Los Angeles counties, but no damage or injuries were reported here.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | JOHN McKINNEY
Father Juan Crespi of the 1769 Portola Expedition dubbed the coastline here San Luis, in honor of the King of France. However, the soldiers of the expedition thought that La Gaviota, Spanish for sea gull, was a more apt description. This hike begins in Gaviota State Park and ends in Los Padres National Forest. You'll visit warm mineral pools, then continue to the top of Gaviota Peak (2,458 feet) for superb views of the Santa Barbara County coast.
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