Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJuan Diego
IN THE NEWS

Juan Diego

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
August 1, 2002 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salvador Suarez, a 37-year-old shoe salesman, traveled all night on a bus from his village in western Mexico and entered the Basilica of Guadalupe at 6 a.m. Wednesday--four hours before the religious experience of his lifetime. Suarez is a full-blooded Nahua Indian and devout Roman Catholic. This was the day his spiritual godfather, Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin, would become the church's first indigenous American saint. The church makes saints of the dead to hold up as models for the living.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
Selene Mayoral thought she had "met such a good man. " At least, that's what she told her mother. She had recently completed a stint in rehab and found a steady job at an electronics manufacturer, where she met Juan Diego Valencia. But Mayoral's mother said in a statement Wednesday that her daughter was duped by her co-worker. "This man, whom my daughter thought was so good ... destroyed our family," she told a judge. Valencia, 31, was convicted earlier this month of shooting Mayoral in the head and then pushing her body from a car during a police chase.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2003 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
A small piece of the cloak of St. Juan Diego -- on which Catholics believe an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe miraculously appeared -- was permanently enshrined at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels on Tuesday amid prayers and the veneration of several hundred faithful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2012 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
Touted as the "largest celebration of the Virgin Mary in a generation," tens of thousands of believers filled the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Sunday afternoon to honor Our Lady of Guadalupe, the long-revered symbol of the Catholic Church. Co-sponsored by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and the Knights of Columbus, the roughly three-hour long, bilingual "Guadalupe Celebration" featured prayer, music and dance, as well as remarks from Archbishop José Gomez of Los Angeles and other religious leaders.
NEWS
December 11, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH and MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the pilgrims crawling on their knees toward the Basilica of Guadalupe here in the Mexican capital to the Latino Roman Catholic parishes of Southern California, an outcry has arisen over a claim that a beloved Indian peasant believed to have been visited by the Virgin Mary in 1531 may never have existed.
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II opened the way Thursday for the canonization of 16th century shepherd Juan Diego as Mexico's first indigenous saint, despite a recent controversy in which a prominent clergyman challenged that he ever existed. Juan Diego's vision of the Virgin of Guadalupe in 1531 on a hillside in what is now Mexico City led to the construction of the nation's most important shrine, the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, and helped make the virgin this country's most beloved religious figure.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The religious highlight of the opening day of Pope John Paul II's current visit to Mexico was a ceremony confirming centuries of reverence for Juan Diego, a 16th-Century Indian peasant, as Mary's messenger. Juan Diego and four other Mexican Catholics were beatified Sunday at the National Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe on the outskirts of Mexico City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2002 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
To a world that celebrates stock options, celebrities and A-list power couples, they are nobodies. The men who huddle every night in the sanctuary of Delores Mission Catholic Church in Boyle Heights have no home. Few speak English. Most have no steady job, waking up before dawn to scrounge for menial work as day laborers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1996 | HUGO QUINTANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"La Virgen del Tepeyac" (The Virgin of Tepeyac) is not solely the dramatic adaptation of a religious story, it is also the carrying on of a tradition strongly rooted in Mexican culture concerning the apparition of the Virgin Mary at the Tepeyac hill in 1531. As presented by the Latino Theatre Company at St. Alphonsus in East Los Angeles, the mise en scene expands the confines of the stage to sections of the church's central hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hundreds of Catholics paraded through the downtown area Sunday in honor of Our Lady of Guadalupe, the patron saint of Mexico. The festival included music, dancing, prayer and dramatized scenes from the traditional story of the Virgin Mary's appearance as an Indian woman on Dec. 9, 1531, before a poor Indian named Juan Diego, when she is said to have asked that the bishop of Mexico build a church in her honor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2011 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
Every Friday, Margarita Jimenez comes to see the virgin in the parking lot, where kids scream, cars honk and the air stinks of exhaust. She turns to the scene of chaos and asks: "Anyone want to pray with me?" No one responds, but she pulls out her rosary beads, bows her head and begins. She knows that in the City of Angels, others share her devotion. Catholics have long created their own sacred spaces here. They build altars in parking lots, chapels in shopping malls, grottos in back alleys and shrines in weed-choked vacant lots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2010 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
Two years ago, Andrea Soto's breathless voice was the faintest in the choir. She wore a wig to hide her scalp ? bare from months of chemotherapy ? and forced herself to smile and keep up with the lyrics. After all, this was a time to say thank you. For many Latino Catholics across Los Angeles, the second week of December is about paying tribute to the mother of God, La Virgen de Guadalupe . They set up altars with lights and roses in their homes, parade in colorful street processions and awake before sunrise each Dec. 12 to serenade the virgin at local churches.
IMAGE
December 6, 2009 | By Ellen Olivier
Alicia Garcia Clark, chairwoman of Hispanics for L.A. Opera, likes to talk about the organization's relationship with Plácido Domingo. Clark said that 18 years ago, when she first sought to rally Latino support for the opera, "Plácido Domingo was the first person to say 'What can I do to help?' Other people said they were too busy, and Plácido is one of the busiest people in the world." Catapulted to success by this auspicious start, L.A. Opera's audience has since grown from 1% Latinos to 11%. And with 275 people at last Sunday's Plácido Domingo Awards Dinner at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the night's proceeds came to more than $100,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2009 | Chris Pasles
It's easy to swoon over tenor Juan Diego Florez's high Cs, which he spun out Tuesday at the Eli and Edythe Broad Stage in Santa Monica with the prodigality of exuberant youth. But his artistry goes far deeper. In fact, his most moving moments came not in the virtuoso challenges of Donizetti, Rossini or Massenet, but in the contained, inward pain of a man singing of leaving his country forever, in "Adios Granada" from Tomas Barrera-Saavedra's zarzuela, "Los emigrantes." The audience's tumultuous reaction seemed to take the 36-year-old Peruvian by surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2008 | Reed Johnson, Johnson is a Times staff writer.
The woman playing the world's most famous woman was fondly remembering Christmases past in Los Angeles. When she was a child, Suzanna Guzman recalled, the windows of Bullock's and other now-defunct department stores dripped with seasonal decor, and the downtown atmosphere was "magical." "It was like our New York," she said. That's one reason why Guzman, an East L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2005 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Honoring the Catholic heritage of Latinos, a shrine to Mary, the mother of Jesus, at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels will be expanded at a cost of $250,000 and with thousands of pieces of broken china donated by Southern Californians. The china will be used to fashion a sweeping mosaic on an existing cathedral courtyard wall that will form the backdrop of the expanded shrine to Our Lady of Guadalupe. Plans for the project were announced Friday by Msgr.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | United Press International
Tens of thousands of the faithful flocked Friday to the Virgin of Guadalupe Shrine to mark the 455th anniversary of the apparition of the country's patron saint. The Virgin of Guadalupe first appeared to a poor Aztec peasant, Juan Diego, in 1531. Church leaders contend that the apparition was responsible for the speed of Indian tribes' conversion to Roman Catholicism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1996 | LORENZA MUN~OZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Hilario Cisneros of Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in Oxnard remembers the day some of his parishioners came to him wanting to know if those awful rumors were true. Was it true, they asked, that a Mexican abbott questioned whether the Virgin of Guadalupe appeared before a humble Indian named Juan Diego nearly 465 years ago? They wondered how anyone could question the Virgin's authenticity. After all, her image is worshiped in places from the holy to the commonplace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2003 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
A small piece of the cloak of St. Juan Diego -- on which Catholics believe an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe miraculously appeared -- was permanently enshrined at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels on Tuesday amid prayers and the veneration of several hundred faithful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2002 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
To a world that celebrates stock options, celebrities and A-list power couples, they are nobodies. The men who huddle every night in the sanctuary of Delores Mission Catholic Church in Boyle Heights have no home. Few speak English. Most have no steady job, waking up before dawn to scrounge for menial work as day laborers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|