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Juan Fernandez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1990 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An informant for the U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration testified Wednesday that law enforcement officials in Mexico regularly aided drug traffickers, taking payoffs to serve as lookouts, helping to transport drugs and delivering rifles used to protect sprawling marijuana ranches.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1990 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An informant for the U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration testified Wednesday that law enforcement officials in Mexico regularly aided drug traffickers, taking payoffs to serve as lookouts, helping to transport drugs and delivering rifles used to protect sprawling marijuana ranches.
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NEWS
February 19, 1989
Four top officers from two of Mexico's biggest brokerage firms were indicted on charges of illegal trading and criminal fraud stemming from an inquiry into the 1987 stock market crash. Treasury Secretary Pedro Aspe Armella said last week that the violations included insider trading in stocks and foreign currencies, the sale of non-existent Treasury certificates and trading in securities without clients' consent.
SPORTS
October 30, 1998
Glendale College swept the men's and women's team and individual titles in the Western State Conference cross-country championships at Cuesta College in San Luis Obispo on Thursday. Jose Merino of Glendale won the men's title with a time of 21:15.7 over the four-mile course to lead the Vaqueros to a 48-49 victory over Bakersfield. Moorpark, two-time defending state champion, was third with 62 points. Julie Harris, from Canyon High, set a course record of 18:59.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
Acclaimed experimental Argentinian writer-director Lisandro Alonso's "Liverpool," which was featured in the Directors Fortnight at Cannes in 2008, is a bold, successful attempt at a film narrative in which images are everything and words are few. Juan Fernandez's Farrel is a lean, good-looking but introverted merchant seaman who asks his freighter captain for shore leave in the port city of Ushuaia, the southernmost town in Tierra del Fuego....
WORLD
March 15, 2003 | Stephen Ixer, Special to The Times
Costa Rica granted asylum Friday to a leader of a failed two-month national strike against President Hugo Chavez after he had eluded Venezuelan authorities for three weeks. Union boss Carlos Ortega arrived at the Costa Rican Embassy here in the Venezuelan capital late Thursday and was granted diplomatic asylum for "humanitarian reasons," the embassy said in a statement. Ortega, who is president of the Confederation of Venezuelan Workers, went into hiding Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Manos' "Liquid Dreams" (at the Monica 4-Plex) has imagination, but it also has lots of bad acting and, much more disturbing, an even larger dose of violence and degradation directed at women that tends to overwhelm its ideas. Candice Daly stars as a young woman who takes an entry-level job as a taxi dancer in a contemporary Dante's Inferno in order to try to find out why and how her sister died there. The setting is a vast L.A. warehouse that has been transformed into a nightclub/brothel.
WORLD
March 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
Secret police swooped in on an anti-government demonstration Saturday in Caracas in a failed attempt to arrest a strike leader who had emerged from hiding to address the rally. The police fired shots into the air and launched tear gas canisters to disperse protesters, who smashed police vehicle windows, local television reported. There were no immediate reports of injuries or arrests.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2003 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
Authentic ingenuity invigorates "The Skin of Our Teeth," currently eviscerating the Evidence Room. Thornton Wilder's visionary allegory on mankind's cockeyed resilience receives an audacious yet comprehensive revival. When "Skin" opened in 1942, Wilder's jovial but firm antiwar sentiment hardly reflected the patriotic fervor of World War II America. Although the play earned Wilder his third Pulitzer Prize, its subversive structure divided contemporary observers. Understandably so.
NEWS
January 12, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
In 1704, a Scottish seaman named Alexander Selkirk, who had quarreled with his captain, was put ashore here. Marooned for more than four years, Selkirk gamely fought for survival in a classic contest of man against nature. He ate the meat of wild goats, used their skins for shelter and clothing and trained them as pets. Two English ships rescued him, strong and healthy, from this remote Pacific island in 1709.
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