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Juan Gabriel

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
There have been few things in pop music over the last two decades as certain as the fun of a live performance by Mexican pop singer Juan Gabriel. Attending one of his concerts was an annual tradition for legions of fans, as regular as a Cinco de Mayo festival. The tickets could have easily come with a guarantee: Gabriel would pour his heart into his hits for at least two hours -- or your money back.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Long before Mexico descended into its "drug war," the phrase itself was invented in another country. In the 1980s the underground industry that processed coca into cocaine and shipped it northward to U.S. consumers transformed Colombian society. It created powerful drug barons who became public villains and icons, and it saw a country and its public institutions nearly consumed by a culture of violence. Juan Gabriel Vásquez's deeply affecting and closely observed new novel takes up the psychic aftermath of that era, as residents of Colombia's capital, Bogota, struggle to make sense of the disorder and dysfunction that's enveloped their daily lives.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1995 | ENRIQUE LOPETEGUI
"Goodby quarrelsome gringos / You're only good for war. / You believe God is white / But He's darker than I. . . ," sings Juan Gabriel in "Cancion 187" ("Song 187"), the story of a Mexican who returns home after bouts of discrimination in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Who better than a pair of Colombian writers whose books have spurred talk of an emerging "literature of conflict" to answer the country's perpetual riddle: Why is Colombia so violent? And will the four-decades-long bloodletting that has exacted tens of thousands of victims ever end? The question was first posed to Juan Gabriel Vasquez, a 38-year-old Bogotá native, who has just published his third novel, "The Sound of Things Falling," a taut yarn about a professor's chance and nearly fatal encounter with a drug trafficker.
NEWS
May 9, 2002
An all-star lineup of Latin artists is scheduled to perform Sunday at a tribute concert for pop singer Juan Gabriel, who on Friday will receive a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame. Sunday's concert at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim will feature some of the biggest names in Latin music, including Colombian singer-songwriter Carlos Vives, Mexican mariachi star Alejandro Fernandez and the influential rock group Jaguares. Gabriel will also perform.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1996 | ENRIQUE LOPETEGUI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Goodbye quarrelsome gringos You're only good for war You believe God is white But He is darker than I * Mexican superstar Juan Gabriel sang those words Saturday night near the end of "Cancion 187" ("Song 187") before a near-capacity crowd at the Anaheim Convention Center. The song is one of the best from his latest album, "El Mexico Que Se Nos Fue" ("The Mexico that left us"), and it symbolizes Gabriel's status as one of Mexico's most energetic social commentators.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1993 | ENRIQUE LOPETEGUI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The estimated 75,000 fans who turned out to see Juan Gabriel on Saturday at the Rose Bowl didn't get everything that was advertised, but they were still enthralled by the charisma and music of this Mexican pop idol. The program--produced and promoted by the Spanish-language Telemundo TV network, which plans to telecast a tape of the show in the near future--was originally billed as "Juan Gabriel y sus mujeres" ("Juan Gabriel and his women").
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Juan Gabriel is known for his glitzy and energetic performances, full of Elvis-style hip jolting and scores of backup musicians. But what's even more remarkable is his longevity. The 44-year-old Mexican pop superstar is celebrating 25 years in the music business with a 40-concert tour of North America that includes a show at the Anaheim Convention Center on Saturday and stops in San Diego June 8 and 9. Juan Gabriel's concerts cover a wealth of material spanning his career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1995
Los Angeles' 38th annual Mexican Independence Parade, commemorating the 185th anniversary of the country's liberation, will be held at 1 p.m. Sunday in East Los Angeles and is expected to draw a crowd of at least half a million. Grand marshal for the parade is Latin pop star Juan Gabriel, who will be performing his songs with an 11-piece mariachi band along the 2 1/2-mile parade route.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Before taking the stage of the Gibson Amphitheatre on Friday night, the pop-mariachi- ranchera singer Pepe Aguilar was preceded by giant video projections of swirling Mexican flags, tolling liberty bells and the stern countenances of Emiliano Zapata, Pancho Villa and José María Morelos. A heavy-handed patriotic display? Not really. This year marks both the bicentennial of Mexico's war of independence from Spain and the 100th anniversary of the Mexican Revolution. Few contemporary Mexican American artists express pride in that cultural heritage more fervently than this Texas-born son of the Mexican singer, film star and all-around pop-culture idol Antonio Aguilar . Now in his early 40s, Pepe Aguilar has been performing since his parents brought him on tour as a toddler.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | Adam Mansbach
The past is a shadow-bound, elusive creature in Colombian writer Juan Gabriel Vasquez's "The Informers." When pursued it may flee, or, if cornered, it may unleash terrible truths. Disturb it even slightly and it can subsume the present, as a journalist learns when his memoir of a family friend inadvertently illuminates events his father -- and his country -- would prefer remained forgotten.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
There have been few things in pop music over the last two decades as certain as the fun of a live performance by Mexican pop singer Juan Gabriel. Attending one of his concerts was an annual tradition for legions of fans, as regular as a Cinco de Mayo festival. The tickets could have easily come with a guarantee: Gabriel would pour his heart into his hits for at least two hours -- or your money back.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2002 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The goal of the inaugural Veranazo 2002 festival Saturday at Dodger Stadium was to deliver an over-the-top, multiple-course musical feast that would outdo all other Latin-music events. And indeed, its Pantagruelian excesses resulted in the kind of sonic satiation that Latin music fans tend to savor. The six-hour show, organized by the radio station conglomerate Hispanic Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
May 9, 2002
An all-star lineup of Latin artists is scheduled to perform Sunday at a tribute concert for pop singer Juan Gabriel, who on Friday will receive a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame. Sunday's concert at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim will feature some of the biggest names in Latin music, including Colombian singer-songwriter Carlos Vives, Mexican mariachi star Alejandro Fernandez and the influential rock group Jaguares. Gabriel will also perform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In The Pond of Anaheim's first big-league venture into the Latino market, Mexican crooner and pop idol Juan Gabriel opened Saturday night in a flash of smoke and light to a crowded house of screaming fans. The Pond has been the site of a mariachi festival, but this was the first pop event geared almost exclusively to a Latino audience. "It's fabulous.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2000 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The gargantuan Latin pop concert sponsored by KLVE-FM (107.5) Friday at Staples Center was designed as a 25th anniversary salute to one of the leading radio stations in the Southland. But the five-hour show also served as an enchanting celebration of the three-decade career of one of Mexico's most prodigious composers, Juan Gabriel.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1999 | ERNESTO LECHNER
** 1/2 Juan Gabriel, "Todo Esta Bien," BMG Latin. This has been a difficult year for Gabriel's voice. At a concert appearance in Anaheim a few months ago, his singing turned into a painful rasp that wouldn't go away. And his first pop collection in five years finds him sounding occasionally strained. But Gabriel has always been a better composer than singer anyway, and romantic balladry is the territory where his tuneful sentimentality can generate some pretty genial music.
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