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Juan Garcia Esquivel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2002 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Garcia Esquivel, who became a pop-music cult icon when his eccentric music from the 1950s and '60s was rediscovered in the '90s, died Jan. 3 at his home in Jiutepec, Mexico, after a stroke. He was 83. The pianist-composer-bandleader, who used just his last name (followed by an exclamation point) professionally, was known for bold, idiosyncratic orchestrations marked by radical dynamics, odd, wordless vocals and unexpected sounds such as steel guitar and whistling.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2002 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Garcia Esquivel, who became a pop-music cult icon when his eccentric music from the 1950s and '60s was rediscovered in the '90s, died Jan. 3 at his home in Jiutepec, Mexico, after a stroke. He was 83. The pianist-composer-bandleader, who used just his last name (followed by an exclamation point) professionally, was known for bold, idiosyncratic orchestrations marked by radical dynamics, odd, wordless vocals and unexpected sounds such as steel guitar and whistling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1995 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Juan Garcia Esquivel has been called everything from the Mexican Duke Ellington to the King of Quirk, but the 77-year-old composer-pianist is probably best known as the master of Space-Age Bachelor Pad music. This bizarre and futuristic style was used to sell ultra-modern hi-fi systems called "stereos" in the early '60s, systems that RCA described as possessing "movement so real your eyes will follow the sound."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1995 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Juan Garcia Esquivel has been called everything from the Mexican Duke Ellington to the King of Quirk, but the 77-year-old composer-pianist is probably best known as the master of Space-Age Bachelor Pad music. This bizarre and futuristic style was used to sell ultra-modern hi-fi systems called "stereos" in the early '60s, systems that RCA described as possessing "movement so real your eyes will follow the sound."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Randy Van Horne, whose Randy Van Horne Singers performed the theme songs for "The Flintstones," "The Jetsons," "The Huckleberry Hound Show" and several other popular television cartoons of the 1960s, has died. He was 83. Van Horne died of cancer Sept. 26 at the Motion Picture and Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, said his son, Mark. In the late 1940s, Van Horne began his career in Los Angeles as a studio musician.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | ROBIN RAUZI
Frequenting the cocktail lounges in your neighborhood is a good start, but what to do when you get back to your bache lor/bachelorette pad? Dust off your turntable. The best--and cheapest--way to amass a good lounge music collection is by rummaging through bins of 50-cent records at garage sales and thrift stores, says collector Kevin "Mr. Fabulous" Trantow. The up-and-coming hepcat can afford to take musical risks at that rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
Sometime between ring-a-ding-ding and hunk-a hunk-a burning love, America slipped into something more comfortable and Bob Thompson was there to help. Thompson was one of the foremost composers and arrangers of what came to be known as "Space Age bachelor pad" music - tunes that allowed hi-fi buffs to turn the lights down low, mix the perfect martini and show off their tweeters and woofers. With cascading strings, upbeat rhythms and - as in his piece "Mmm Nice!" - breathy female singers, Thompson's music set a mood, but was more than mood music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once, on a street in Mexico City, David Harrington, the Kronos Quartet's first violinist, encountered a one-armed street musician playing standard melodies by blowing on the edge of an ivy leaf. It is an eerie sound, unlike any other, and you never forget it. Harrington knew instantly, he told the audience at UCLA's Royce Hall on Friday night, that one day Kronos had to play with Carlos Garcia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2002 | Agustin Gurza; Randy Lewis; Natalie Nichols; Steve Baltin
**** KRONOS QUARTET "Nuevo" Nonesuch Sometimes, it takes outsiders to find fresh perspectives on a musical culture that natives take for granted. On this brilliant album, Argentine rock producer Gustavo Santaolalla teams with Kronos, the experimental U.S. string quartet, to create a revealing, impressionistic portrait of Mexican music, from the corrido to the classical. Though the 14 tracks span a century, the album's innovative interpretations earn its title, which means "new."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2006 | Robert Barr, Associated Press
Start talking with Colin Larkin, editor of the "Encyclopedia of Popular Music," and free association kicks in. Anything, anyone, might come up. Dave "Baby" Cortez, for example. And that's exactly what Larkin intends. "The whole point of the EPM is to enthuse people," says Larkin, whose own obsession with pop over half a century has evolved into a full-time business. The fourth edition of the reference work, now expanded to 10 volumes encompassing 3.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Ross WRIGHT, a.k.a. Elvis Schoenberg, is stirring the pot. But though his homemade spaghetti sauce, its pungent aroma wafting through the air, may be assaulting olfactory senses, it's the sound of 20-odd musicians tuning up -- violins, trumpets, woodwinds, percussion, electric guitars and keyboard -- that nearly blows the roof off his tiny Highland Park home.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2005 | Steven Rosen, Special to The Times
At first, filmmaker Gus Van Sant was so affected by Kurt Cobain's 1994 suicide that he wanted to make a biopic on the Seattle grunge musician's life. What he made instead -- "Last Days," which opened Friday in Los Angeles -- isn't one per se. Indeed, "Last Days" is best described as an impressionistic art/experimental film -- a mood piece -- that attempts to get inside the confused and agitated state of a rock musician named Blake, just before his suicide.
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