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Juan Jose Gutierrez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2013 | By Cindy Chang
Rodolfo Bravo, a native of Baja, Mexico, crossed the border illegally when he was 24. He found work at a Los Angeles-area tire shop. He had two children, Stephany and Rodolfo. Over two decades passed. Stephany is now 21 and a student at UC Santa Barbara. Rodolfo Jr. is 13. Bravo still works at the same tire shop. And he and his wife are still in the United States illegally. Stephany applied for permanent residency for her parents as soon as she turned 21. But the process, if successful, will take years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2013 | By Cindy Chang
Rodolfo Bravo, a native of Baja, Mexico, crossed the border illegally when he was 24. He found work at a Los Angeles-area tire shop. He had two children, Stephany and Rodolfo. Over two decades passed. Stephany is now 21 and a student at UC Santa Barbara. Rodolfo Jr. is 13. Bravo still works at the same tire shop. And he and his wife are still in the United States illegally. Stephany applied for permanent residency for her parents as soon as she turned 21. But the process, if successful, will take years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1996 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The organizers of the Latino march and rally in Washington, who were told it couldn't be done, are pretty satisfied with themselves. Getting 20,000 to 30,000 people of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Central American and Cuban descent together for the march--and wide media coverage--was no easy task. "It was an unprecedented success," says Juan Jose Gutierrez of Los Angeles, the lead coordinator of the event that drew thousands of participants from across Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1996 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The organizers of the Latino march and rally in Washington, who were told it couldn't be done, are pretty satisfied with themselves. Getting 20,000 to 30,000 people of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Central American and Cuban descent together for the march--and wide media coverage--was no easy task. "It was an unprecedented success," says Juan Jose Gutierrez of Los Angeles, the lead coordinator of the event that drew thousands of participants from across Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1988
Four Eastside lawmakers, led by Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre, made another plea for hesitant illegal aliens to apply for amnesty under the 1986 Immigration Reform Act before the May 4 deadline. "Whether we like it or not, it's the law and people ought to take advantage of it," said Alatorre, who, like many other Latino leaders, opposed the law's enactment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998
A family law center that provides free and low-cost service opened in Boyle Heights on Thursday at the One Stop Immigration Center, officials announced. "As the immigrant community becomes more established in the United States, the need to create a diversity of services to meet the needs of this community has increased dramatically," said Juan Jose Gutierrez, executive director of the nonprofit group. The new Family Support Center is at 2045 1/2 Cesar Chavez Ave.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ
Amid a sea of red, white and blue American flags, about 7,000 people on Sunday attended an anti-Proposition 187 concert in Monterey Park, where they heard dozens of bands and speakers denounce the measure as a racist attack on Latinos. "California does not need Proposition 187. California needs human rights for all," one of the event organizers, Juan Jose Gutierrez, told the crowd assembled at the football stadium at East Los Angeles College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1999
City Council candidate Victor Griego, who already has endorsements from several state and local politicians, picked up another one Wednesday, when Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina announced that she will support him. Molina, who met and interviewed many of the candidates in the 14th District, has said the decision was a particularly difficult one because she knew most of the candidates personally and has a high opinion of many of them.
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A recently rescinded federal deadline of today for immigrants to apply for new green cards has added to widespread uncertainty about the controversial requirement that affects more than 1 million people nationwide, immigrant advocates say. "There's rampant confusion all over the place," said Juan Jose Gutierrez, executive director of One Stop Immigration, an Eastside social service organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Who could have predicted that a tiny group based in Tustin, with the help of former Immigration and Naturalization Service honchos Harold Ezell and Bill King, would turn this election year upside down? The group's baby, Proposition 187, may not save the state, but it's certainly saved us all from a state of total electoral boredom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1999
With the City Council runoff election less than a month away, the political endorsements continue to stack up in the fiercely contested race for the Eastside's 14th District. On Monday, U.S. Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles) said she will support candidate Nick Pacheco, who is also backed by Mayor Richard Riordan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1999 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of organized labor's leading candidates in the crowded race for the Eastside City Council seat apparently has failed to qualify for the ballot, the city clerk's office confirmed Tuesday. Late in the day, however, Jorge Mancillas' campaign workers were poring over nominating forms in hopes of discovering enough overlooked valid signatures to merit an appeal.
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