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Juan Manuel Alvarez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
A gasp filled a downtown Los Angeles courtroom Wednesday as a judge sentenced a former Compton laborer to 11 consecutive life prison terms for triggering a commuter train crash that killed 11 people, the deadliest train crash in Metrolink's history. Convicted murderer Juan Manuel Alvarez sat silent, and the gasp, along with audible sighs, came from the gallery as Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge William R. Pounders handed down the sentence. Pounders also criticized Alvarez for lacking genuine remorse for the crash.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
A gasp filled a downtown Los Angeles courtroom Wednesday as a judge sentenced a former Compton laborer to 11 consecutive life prison terms for triggering a commuter train crash that killed 11 people, the deadliest train crash in Metrolink's history. Convicted murderer Juan Manuel Alvarez sat silent, and the gasp, along with audible sighs, came from the gallery as Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge William R. Pounders handed down the sentence. Pounders also criticized Alvarez for lacking genuine remorse for the crash.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Ever since he drove his vehicle onto the railroad tracks, triggering the deadly Metrolink train wreck, Juan Manuel Alvarez has maintained that the tragedy was an abortive suicide attempt and that he didn't mean to hurt anyone. But on Tuesday, a witness undercut that theory by recounting how Alvarez, before abandoning his sport utility vehicle, may have tried to ensure that it would catch fire or even explode. Eleven people died in the Jan. 26 crash.
OPINION
July 18, 2008
Re "Jury spares killer's life in rail crash," July 16 Unbelievable. Carmelita Alvarez, the wife of convicted killer Juan Manuel Alvarez, is going to tell her children when they get older that their father was unfairly convicted. In fact, what she should tell her children is that their father was subjected to the best system of justice ever devised, that he was presumed innocent until proved guilty, that he was justifiably convicted following a public trial and full opportunity to confront his accusers and that his life was spared by a jury of his peers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2005 | Sam Quinones and Erica Williams, Times Staff Writers
Reyna Barcena invited Juan Manuel Alvarez to spaghetti dinner Tuesday night. He showed up the next morning, covered in blood, mumbling: "I'm sorry. A lot of dead people. A lot of people's dead. I'm sorry. I didn't mean it." "I didn't know what he was talking about," Barcena said. Alvarez was crouched on her doorstep in Atwater Village, several blocks north of where rescuers had begun pulling the dead and injured from the trains mangled in Wednesday's crash.
OPINION
July 18, 2008
Re "Jury spares killer's life in rail crash," July 16 Unbelievable. Carmelita Alvarez, the wife of convicted killer Juan Manuel Alvarez, is going to tell her children when they get older that their father was unfairly convicted. In fact, what she should tell her children is that their father was subjected to the best system of justice ever devised, that he was presumed innocent until proved guilty, that he was justifiably convicted following a public trial and full opportunity to confront his accusers and that his life was spared by a jury of his peers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2005 | Natasha Lee, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors announced Friday they will seek the death penalty against a former construction worker accused of driving his SUV onto railroad tracks and causing the collision of three trains in Glendale that killed 11 people and injured almost 200. Juan Manuel Alvarez, 26, is charged with 11 counts of murder and arson in the Jan. 26 Metrolink crash in which a commuter train struck his SUV, derailed and slammed into another commuter train and a freight train.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Juan Manuel Alvarez exhibited bizarre and delusional behavior for at least five years before causing a deadly Metrolink crash three years ago, his wife testified Tuesday. Carmelita Alvarez said her husband -- who is on trial for murder -- was extremely possessive of her and often accused her of having affairs, even with her own nephew. He also tried to kill himself three times, she said during two days of testimony that began Monday. "I had to be in the middle of the bed facing him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
After nearly eight weeks of testimony, a jury Tuesday started deliberating the fate of a Compton man who left his vehicle on railroad tracks and caused a deadly Metrolink wreck three years ago. Juan Manuel Alvarez, 29, is charged with 11 counts of murder and one count each of arson and train-wrecking. He could face the death penalty if convicted. "Don't forget these 11 victims," Deputy Dist. Atty. Cathryn Brougham told the jury as she concluded her closing arguments Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Juan Manuel Alvarez, the construction worker whose suicide attempt last month allegedly caused a fiery Metrolink crash and killed 11 people, pleaded not guilty Tuesday to first-degree murder and arson. Prosecutors have not yet decided whether they will seek the death penalty against him. Alvarez, 25, allegedly parked his Jeep Grand Cherokee on railroad tracks in Glendale on Jan. 26, hoping that a train would kill him, but he ran away when he changed his mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons and Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writers
Ending a legal saga surrounding the deadliest train crash in Metrolink history, a Los Angeles jury decided Tuesday to spare the life of a former Compton laborer convicted of triggering the 2005 wreck that killed 11 people and injured at least 180 others. Juan Manuel Alvarez, 29, smiled broadly and spoke quietly to a member of his defense team after the verdict was read in a packed downtown courtroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
After nearly eight weeks of testimony, a jury Tuesday started deliberating the fate of a Compton man who left his vehicle on railroad tracks and caused a deadly Metrolink wreck three years ago. Juan Manuel Alvarez, 29, is charged with 11 counts of murder and one count each of arson and train-wrecking. He could face the death penalty if convicted. "Don't forget these 11 victims," Deputy Dist. Atty. Cathryn Brougham told the jury as she concluded her closing arguments Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Juan Manuel Alvarez exhibited bizarre and delusional behavior for at least five years before causing a deadly Metrolink crash three years ago, his wife testified Tuesday. Carmelita Alvarez said her husband -- who is on trial for murder -- was extremely possessive of her and often accused her of having affairs, even with her own nephew. He also tried to kill himself three times, she said during two days of testimony that began Monday. "I had to be in the middle of the bed facing him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Juan Manuel Alvarez does not dispute that his actions led to the tragic Metrolink train collision three years ago in which 11 people were killed and more than 180 injured. What he does contest is that he intended to harm anybody other than himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2005 | Natasha Lee, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors announced Friday they will seek the death penalty against a former construction worker accused of driving his SUV onto railroad tracks and causing the collision of three trains in Glendale that killed 11 people and injured almost 200. Juan Manuel Alvarez, 26, is charged with 11 counts of murder and arson in the Jan. 26 Metrolink crash in which a commuter train struck his SUV, derailed and slammed into another commuter train and a freight train.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Ever since he drove his vehicle onto the railroad tracks, triggering the deadly Metrolink train wreck, Juan Manuel Alvarez has maintained that the tragedy was an abortive suicide attempt and that he didn't mean to hurt anyone. But on Tuesday, a witness undercut that theory by recounting how Alvarez, before abandoning his sport utility vehicle, may have tried to ensure that it would catch fire or even explode. Eleven people died in the Jan. 26 crash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2005 | Richard Winton and Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writers
Juan Manuel Alvarez's troubles had been building long before he drove his Jeep Cherokee onto the train tracks in an aborted suicide attempt that derailed two commuter trains and killed 11 people, according to family members, acquaintances and court records. Alvarez, a pony-tailed sometime construction worker, had been separated from his wife for several months amid allegations that he had threatened her and her family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Juan Manuel Alvarez does not dispute that his actions led to the tragic Metrolink train collision three years ago in which 11 people were killed and more than 180 injured. What he does contest is that he intended to harm anybody other than himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Juan Manuel Alvarez, the construction worker whose suicide attempt last month allegedly caused a fiery Metrolink crash and killed 11 people, pleaded not guilty Tuesday to first-degree murder and arson. Prosecutors have not yet decided whether they will seek the death penalty against him. Alvarez, 25, allegedly parked his Jeep Grand Cherokee on railroad tracks in Glendale on Jan. 26, hoping that a train would kill him, but he ran away when he changed his mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2005 | Sam Quinones and Erica Williams, Times Staff Writers
Reyna Barcena invited Juan Manuel Alvarez to spaghetti dinner Tuesday night. He showed up the next morning, covered in blood, mumbling: "I'm sorry. A lot of dead people. A lot of people's dead. I'm sorry. I didn't mean it." "I didn't know what he was talking about," Barcena said. Alvarez was crouched on her doorstep in Atwater Village, several blocks north of where rescuers had begun pulling the dead and injured from the trains mangled in Wednesday's crash.
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