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Juan Manuel Santos

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WORLD
January 9, 2009 | Chris Kraul
Soon after President-elect Barack Obama's inauguration, Colombian Defense Minister Juan Manuel Santos will fly to Washington to lobby for continuance of Plan Colombia, the largest U.S. foreign aid program outside the Middle East and Afghanistan. Colombian leaders face a steep challenge: persuading the new administration to maintain $556 million a year in military and economic aid as it braces for an era of trillion-dollar deficits.
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WORLD
May 26, 2013 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - In a milestone first step in efforts to end Latin America's longest-running insurgency, Colombia's largest rebel group and the government said Sunday that they had reached an agreement on land reform, the first of six points that could make up an eventual peace deal. The agreement on agrarian reform, considered a crucial element of any broader accord, is a boost for President Juan Manuel Santos, who last summer took the risky political move of restarting peace talks with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.
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OPINION
August 9, 2010 | By Carolina Barco
In his Aug. 5 Times Op-Ed article, " U.S. needs to reevaluate Plan Colombia ," Milburn Line raises some important issues about the U.S.-Colombia alliance. Unfortunately, in questioning the progress Colombia has made under former President Alvaro Uribe in fighting insurgencies and curtailing the drug trade, Line presents an uninformed point of view. That Colombia has undergone an impressive transformation over the past decade is inarguable. The dramatic reduction in violence — with homicides having dropped by 45% between 2002 and 2009 — has yielded crime rates throughout our nation that are lower than those in many U.S. cities.
WORLD
September 4, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - Prospects for an end to more than four decades of armed rebellion in Colombia inched closer to reality Tuesday as President Juan Manuel Santos announced that his government had agreed to start peace talks with the country's largest insurgent group. The first open negotiations in a decade between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, will start early next month in Oslo and then shift to Cuba, and will span "months, not years," Santos said.
WORLD
August 28, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia — President Juan Manuel Santos on Monday night said his government was in "exploratory discussions" to end more than four decades of conflict with Colombia's largest rebel group. In a short televised address, Santos said the government had engaged in discussion with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, but he did not disclose details such as where the talks were held. Meetings have been held in Cuba, according to news reports and speculation.
WORLD
September 24, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
The Colombian armed forces delivered a major blow to the nation's largest insurgent group, killing a key rebel leader at his base camp in a remote area of southeastern Meta state. President Juan Manuel Santos, in New York to attend a session of the United Nations, confirmed Thursday that longtime rebel leader Victor Julio Suarez Rojas, 57, had been killed in an operation carried out Wednesday and early Thursday by 600 troops, led by special forces and supported by 27 helicopters and 30 other aircraft.
WORLD
September 4, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - Prospects for an end to more than four decades of armed rebellion in Colombia inched closer to reality Tuesday as President Juan Manuel Santos announced that his government had agreed to start peace talks with the country's largest insurgent group. The first open negotiations in a decade between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, will start early next month in Oslo and then shift to Cuba, and will span "months, not years," Santos said.
WORLD
March 28, 2009 | Chris Kraul
The would-be killers mounted a daring plan: renting a property adjacent to Colombian Defense Minister Juan Manuel Santos' suburban farm and secreting police uniforms, weapons and motorcycles at the site to facilitate a Holy Week assassination. Once again, Colombia's largest rebel group, known as the FARC, was trying to kill Santos. In revealing the foiled plot this week and announcing the arrests of 11 alleged rebel conspirators, Colombian National Police commander Gen.
OPINION
January 5, 2012
Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos is asking lawmakers in his country to approve sweeping changes in the judicial system. The most controversial of these would expand the military's jurisdiction to investigate and prosecute alleged human rights crimes committed by security forces. Currently such cases are handled by civilian courts and judges. That's not the kind of reform Colombia needs. This is a country, after all, where a decades-long armed conflict has led to repeated massacres and human rights violations by government forces.
WORLD
April 14, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Matea Gold, Los Angeles Times
CARTAGENA, Colombia - President Obama sought Saturday to emphasize the robust economic relationship between the United States and Latin America, and he flatly ruled out legalizing drugs as a way to combat the illegal trafficking that has ravaged the region. Facing calls at a regional summit to consider decriminalization, Obama said he is open to a debate about drug policy, but he believes that legalization could lead to greater problems in countries hardest hit by drug-fueled violence.
WORLD
August 28, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia — President Juan Manuel Santos on Monday night said his government was in "exploratory discussions" to end more than four decades of conflict with Colombia's largest rebel group. In a short televised address, Santos said the government had engaged in discussion with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, but he did not disclose details such as where the talks were held. Meetings have been held in Cuba, according to news reports and speculation.
WORLD
August 1, 2012 | By Chris Kraul and Jenny Carolina Gonzalez, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - Like their U.S. counterparts, Colombian presidents customarily give accountings of their performances in addresses that resemble the State of the Union speech. But the speeches President Juan Manuel Santos has been giving in several cities to mark his two years in office are also an exercise in damage control, analysts say, to restore his plummeting popularity and counter sniping by his still-popular predecessor, ex-President Alvaro Uribe. A poll commissioned by Semana magazine showed Santos' approval rating has fallen to 47%, with 48% of those polled disapproving his performance.
WORLD
April 14, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Matea Gold, Los Angeles Times
CARTAGENA, Colombia - President Obama sought Saturday to emphasize the robust economic relationship between the United States and Latin America, and he flatly ruled out legalizing drugs as a way to combat the illegal trafficking that has ravaged the region. Facing calls at a regional summit to consider decriminalization, Obama said he is open to a debate about drug policy, but he believes that legalization could lead to greater problems in countries hardest hit by drug-fueled violence.
OPINION
January 5, 2012
Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos is asking lawmakers in his country to approve sweeping changes in the judicial system. The most controversial of these would expand the military's jurisdiction to investigate and prosecute alleged human rights crimes committed by security forces. Currently such cases are handled by civilian courts and judges. That's not the kind of reform Colombia needs. This is a country, after all, where a decades-long armed conflict has led to repeated massacres and human rights violations by government forces.
WORLD
September 24, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
The Colombian armed forces delivered a major blow to the nation's largest insurgent group, killing a key rebel leader at his base camp in a remote area of southeastern Meta state. President Juan Manuel Santos, in New York to attend a session of the United Nations, confirmed Thursday that longtime rebel leader Victor Julio Suarez Rojas, 57, had been killed in an operation carried out Wednesday and early Thursday by 600 troops, led by special forces and supported by 27 helicopters and 30 other aircraft.
WORLD
August 10, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
In an effort to improve severely strained diplomatic relations, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and newly inaugurated Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos plan a summit Tuesday likely to include discussion of the alleged presence of Colombian rebels in Venezuela and frozen cross-border trade. Chavez and Santos, who was sworn in Saturday, have expressed a desire to improve relations between their nations after tension between Chavez and former Colombian President Alvaro Uribe.
WORLD
August 1, 2012 | By Chris Kraul and Jenny Carolina Gonzalez, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - Like their U.S. counterparts, Colombian presidents customarily give accountings of their performances in addresses that resemble the State of the Union speech. But the speeches President Juan Manuel Santos has been giving in several cities to mark his two years in office are also an exercise in damage control, analysts say, to restore his plummeting popularity and counter sniping by his still-popular predecessor, ex-President Alvaro Uribe. A poll commissioned by Semana magazine showed Santos' approval rating has fallen to 47%, with 48% of those polled disapproving his performance.
WORLD
August 10, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
In an effort to improve severely strained diplomatic relations, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and newly inaugurated Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos plan a summit Tuesday likely to include discussion of the alleged presence of Colombian rebels in Venezuela and frozen cross-border trade. Chavez and Santos, who was sworn in Saturday, have expressed a desire to improve relations between their nations after tension between Chavez and former Colombian President Alvaro Uribe.
OPINION
August 9, 2010 | By Carolina Barco
In his Aug. 5 Times Op-Ed article, " U.S. needs to reevaluate Plan Colombia ," Milburn Line raises some important issues about the U.S.-Colombia alliance. Unfortunately, in questioning the progress Colombia has made under former President Alvaro Uribe in fighting insurgencies and curtailing the drug trade, Line presents an uninformed point of view. That Colombia has undergone an impressive transformation over the past decade is inarguable. The dramatic reduction in violence — with homicides having dropped by 45% between 2002 and 2009 — has yielded crime rates throughout our nation that are lower than those in many U.S. cities.
WORLD
August 7, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
On his inauguration day eight years ago, leftist guerrillas tried to kill Colombian President Alvaro Uribe with a rocket and mortar attack. The U.S. government had drawn up contingency plans for a rebel-led government, and citizens were hunkering down in their homes at night in fear. As Colombians who lived through those dark days know, Uribe on Saturday will turn over a far safer country to his successor, former Defense Minister Juan Manuel Santos, who was elected in a June landslide after promising to continue Uribe's policies.
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