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Juan Rafael Bustillo

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November 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
A U.S. probe into the 1989 killings of six Jesuit priests has concluded that there is evidence the crime was plotted by senior Salvadoran army officers, including the defense minister, a newspaper reported today. The inquiry by a panel of House Democrats concluded that Gen. Rene Emilio Ponce--the current defense minister and former army chief of staff--and other top officers planned the attack a day before it happened, the New York Times reported.
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NEWS
November 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
A U.S. probe into the 1989 killings of six Jesuit priests has concluded that there is evidence the crime was plotted by senior Salvadoran army officers, including the defense minister, a newspaper reported today. The inquiry by a panel of House Democrats concluded that Gen. Rene Emilio Ponce--the current defense minister and former army chief of staff--and other top officers planned the attack a day before it happened, the New York Times reported.
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NEWS
April 28, 1987 | Associated Press
A Salvadoran military helicopter crashed shortly after takeoff at Ilopango air base outside the capital, and 10 people were killed, the head of the air force said. Gen. Juan Rafael Bustillo said the accident occurred when the U.S.-made UH-1H helicopter went down with five crew members and five civilians aboard. There was no immediate identification of the victims. The U.S. Embassy said no Americans were aboard.
NEWS
April 29, 1987
A Salvadoran military helicopter exploded shortly after takeoff from the Ilopango air base outside San Salvador, killing all nine people aboard, El Salvador's air force chief said. Those aboard the U.S.-built UH-1H Huey were two crewmen, two artillerymen and five civilians, including a woman on her way to visit her officer son, Gen. Juan Rafael Bustillo said. No Americans were reported aboard. The helicopter was en route to a military base at San Miguel, 60 miles east of San Salvador.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The air force of El Salvador, in violation of U.S. military aid regulations, has resold at least $801,000-worth of U.S.-donated aviation fuel for cash, the General Accounting Office reported Thursday. Much of the fuel was sold to U.S. government agencies--meaning that the United States paid for the fuel twice, Democratic senators charged in a stormy congressional hearing. The Salvadorans also sold $109,335 worth of fuel to the secret airlift operation run by White House aide Oliver L. North to resupply the Nicaraguan Contras, the GAO found.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government and rebel negotiators from El Salvador opened a new round of peace talks here Monday after hearing a plea by Costa Rica's president to "rectify the history of 10 years of war in your country." "Seven million Salvadorans have turned their eyes toward you, with optimism and faith," President Oscar Arias Sanchez told the negotiators in a public ceremony. "You have an obligation to bury the past, because you do not want to leave here as accomplices of more war."
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Oscar Arias Sanchez of Costa Rica urged the Salvadoran government and leftist guerrillas Sunday to declare a Christmas cease-fire after the bloodiest month of combat in that country's decade-old civil war. Arias made the appeal in a proposal submitted at a meeting here of the five Central American presidents. He called on the two sides in El Salvador to stop fighting from Tuesday through Jan.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
President-elect Alfredo Cristiani's handling of key decisions concerning the military and his Cabinet in the days before his inauguration today has raised serious concerns among diplomats and officials about his ability to control radical hard-line elements in his own party and the armed forces. Cristiani had gained support among Salvadoran moderates, the Bush Administration and even U.S. congressional liberals by arguing that he has the will and the strength to control the ultra-right wing of his party, the Nationalist Republican Alliance.
NEWS
October 14, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Contradicting a statement made by Vice President George Bush, El Salvador's military chief of staff said Monday that no American citizens or other foreigners except authorized American military advisers have been working with the Salvadoran armed forces in the fight against leftist guerrillas. "No one could hire a civilian as an adviser," said Gen. Adolfo Blandon, the nation's top military staff officer.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Edwin G. Corr had lunch "at least once" with a former CIA agent based here who was supplying Nicaraguan rebels from a Salvadoran air force base, a knowledgeable official said Wednesday. The official, who asked that he not be further identified, said that Corr knew the former agent, Felix Rodriguez, a Cuban-American who also uses the names Felix Gomez and Max Gomez. U.S. officials here say that Rodriguez has no official connection with the U.S. Embassy.
NEWS
April 27, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
A key figure in the secret airlift that aided Nicaraguan rebels during 1985 and 1986 was apparently recruited by then-White House aide Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, not by Vice President George Bush, sources familiar with the contra scandal investigations said Sunday. Felix Rodriguez, a former CIA operative who helped direct the contra airlift's operations at El Salvador's Ilopango air base, initially went to Central America with the help of a Bush aide, Donald P. Gregg, the sources said.
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