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Juan Villalonga

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BUSINESS
August 3, 2000 | From Reuters
Spanish stock market regulators cleared former Telefonica Chairman Juan Villalonga of wrongdoing Wednesday in an insider trading investigation that helped force his resignation last week. The National Securities Market Commission said there was insufficient evidence to prove that Villalonga--chief architect of the telecom company's global expansion--used privileged information in a 1998 stock options trade.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 2000 | From Reuters
Spanish stock market regulators cleared former Telefonica Chairman Juan Villalonga of wrongdoing Wednesday in an insider trading investigation that helped force his resignation last week. The National Securities Market Commission said there was insufficient evidence to prove that Villalonga--chief architect of the telecom company's global expansion--used privileged information in a 1998 stock options trade.
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BUSINESS
August 11, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Telefonica named Fernando Abril-Martorell as chief executive, rehiring its former chief financial officer and shuffling management after Juan Villalonga resigned as chairman of Spain's biggest phone company. Abril, 38, most recently served as chairman of Telefonica Publicidad e Informacion, the phone directory unit. He left the ex-monopoly in June after his relationship with then-chairman Villalonga soured.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2000 | Associated Press
Telefonica President Juan Villalonga, under investigation for possible insider-trading violations, reportedly has reached an agreement in principle with key shareholders to resign. The Spanish telecommunications giant declined to comment on the report in the newspaper El Mundo. The paper said Villalonga could announce his resignation in a Telefonica board meeting scheduled for today. The meeting could be delayed a few days, however, because Villalonga's mother died Monday.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2000 | From Reuters
Besieged Telefonica Chairman Juan Villalonga stepped down Wednesday as head of the Spanish company he transformed from a sleepy state telephone monopoly into a multinational powerhouse. Telefonica's board named Cesar Alierta, chairman of French-Spanish tobacco group Altadis, to replace Villalonga, who is facing an investigation for alleged insider trading, the telecom giant said. "The appropriate time has come for a change in the company's leadership," Telefonica said.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2000 | PETER SVENSSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spanish Internet company Terra Networks said Tuesday that it will buy U.S. Internet portal Lycos Inc. for $12.5 billion in stock. The widely expected deal, announced after the close of financial markets, gives the dominant Internet service provider in Latin America a foothold in the United States, where about 35 million Spanish speakers have an average income well above that of their counterparts south of the border. Under terms of the deal, Lycos shareholders will receive $97.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1998 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of consolidation swept the fast-growing telephone industry Monday as two companies proposed a big merger and three others announced a global alliance. Creating the nation's fourth-largest long-distance phone company, Denver-based Qwest Communications International Inc. said it would buy LCI International Inc. of McLean, Va., in a $4.4-billion all-stock deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2004 | Dan Weikel and Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writers
An Argentine judge has banned Southern California Edison from shipping a decommissioned nuclear reactor from San Onofre within 200 miles of his nation's coast, adding a new and risky complication to hauling the atomic refuse to a disposal site. The ruling, the latest in a series of setbacks for the utility, could force the shipment into more treacherous waters as it passes Cape Horn, the tip of South America known for its severe weather.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He still looks the part of a provincial tax inspector, the job he held before rising, improbably, to govern Spain. His heavy eyebrows and mustache seem to suppress any instinct to smile, even for the voters he needs again today. Yet as he wound up his reelection campaign, Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar projected the image of a leader who has grown in stature and confidence to become, thanks to Spain's booming economy, the standard-bearer for Europe's few ruling conservatives.
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