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Juan Williams

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2010
The commentator fired by National Public Radio in October for his remarks about Muslims has a deal to write two books. Crown Publishers announced Tuesday that the first book by Juan Williams will "focus on free speech and the growing difficulty in America of speaking out on sensitive topics. " Williams was let go by NPR after saying on the Fox News Channel he gets nervous when he sees people on a plane wearing clothing that identifies them as Muslim. NPR said his remarks violated its standards of not having on-air personnel giving opinions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before finding a way to check out Al Jazeera America. The Skinny: I want to watch Al Jazeera America but alas am a Time Warner Cable subscriber and it doesn't have a deal to carry the news channel, which launches today. I need to get a friend with DirecTV to record some shows or invite me over. I'll bring the chips. Tuesday's roundup includes a look at whether there are too many animated movies out there. Also, Gary Knell steps down as the head of National Public Radio and Demi Lovato takes a role on "Glee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2011 | James Rainey
It's been eight months since Juan Williams touched off one of those overwrought media tempests. The jolt to the news ecosystem came when Williams told Fox News' Bill O'Reilly that he felt a certain unease when he saw people in "Muslim garb" on airplanes. Muslim activists cried foul, a modest brawl ensued. It escalated into a full-on slam-dance when NPR, which employed Williams as a news analyst, fired him. Even a lot of the radio network's insiders acknowledge today that management acted peremptorily, canning Williams without a hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012
NPR to cover diversity National Public Radio, criticized in recent years over diversity of its staff and coverage, is using a $1.5-million grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to put together a six-person team to report stories on race, ethnicity and culture. NPR said Thursday that it would launch "a major storytelling initiative focused on the racial, ethnic, ideological and generational issues that define an increasingly diverse America. " The team will include two digital journalists, a correspondent, two reporters and an editor.
NEWS
October 21, 2010 | By Matea Gold, Tribune Washington Bureau
As NPR weathered a storm of criticism Thursday for its decision to fire news analyst Juan Williams for his comments about Muslims, Fox News moved aggressively to turn the controversy to its advantage by signing Williams to an expanded role at the cable news network. Fox News Chief Executive Roger Ailes handed Williams a new three-year contract Thursday morning, in a deal that amounts to nearly $2 million, a considerable bump up from his previous salary, the Tribune Washington Bureau has learned.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2010 | James Rainey
It would be an understatement to say that National Public Radio's firing of analyst Juan Williams for his comments about Muslims has created a furor. Commentators across the political spectrum have slammed the radio network. Internet message boards have been jammed. Cable TV and talk radio cannot get enough. Appearing on Fox News' "The O'Reilly Factor" Monday night, Williams said he worries when he sees people in "Muslim garb" get on an airplane. "I think, you know, they're identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims," he said.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | HOWARD KURTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
Juan Williams, a Washington Post Magazine reporter who wrote an opinion column minimizing the allegations of sexual harassment against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, was at the time the subject of an inquiry by the newspaper into allegations by several female colleagues of verbal sexual harassment, the newspaper said today. Executive Editor Leonard Downie Jr.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2010 | By Steve Padilla
National Public Radio terminated the contract of commentator Juan Williams after he said on Fox's "The O'Reilly Factor" that people wearing Muslim garb on airplanes made him "worried" and "nervous. " The move was first reported Wednesday on Twitter by NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik, who said Williams' remarks "were inconsistent with our editorial standards. " Williams was discussing political correctness Monday with host Bill O'Reilly and said that it could "lead to some kind of paralysis, where you don't address reality.
OPINION
October 22, 2010
It can be hard to determine when a public figure has said something so offensive that he or she should be fired. But this much should be obvious: There has to be room in our public discourse for an honest statement, civilly expressed, even if it is prejudicial. NPR overreacted by dumping news analyst Juan Williams after he expressed personal nervousness on Fox News about boarding planes with Muslims who wear religious clothing Williams' comments were no doubt hurtful to Muslims, and ignorant as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2011 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
National Public Radio's admission that it botched the handling of Juan Williams' termination last year, resulting in the resignation of its top news executive Thursday, seems certain to reignite a push by conservatives in Congress to cut government funding for the news organization. The sponsor of a bill to eliminate NPR's taxpayer support ? as well as a proposal to stop federal money for all of public broadcasting, including TV ? said the re-airing of the Williams affair this week would put more heat on institutions already unpopular with congressional Republicans.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By James Oliphant
Newt Gingrich, displaying the combativeness that helped him rocket to the top of the GOP field back in November and December, faced off against Fox News commentator Juan Williams at the debate in Myrtle Beach, S.C., over his suggestion that impoverished youths take janitorial jobs to learn the value of work. Williams asked Gingrich if his comments weren't “insulting to all Americans," particularly, he said, black Americans. Gingrich refused to leaven his past comments, saying that for the amount of money one New York City janitor earns, 30 kids could work.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2011 | James Rainey
Big Bird, Elmo and their pals made huggable toys and helped turn "Sesame Street" into a durable worldwide brand. One man who got much of the credit was Sesame Workshop Chief Executive Gary E. Knell. He strengthened the financial platform for the venerable children's show, even amid exploding competition. Now Knell faces what appears to be an even tougher task: securing the long-term fiscal underpinning of NPR, where he takes over Dec. 1 as president and CEO. Since no one appears to be champing at the bit for dolls of Nina Totenberg and the "Car Talk" guys, Knell must devise some other way either to "liberate public radio from untenable reliance on fed dollars" — the unexpected recommendation expressed recently by his predecessor — or persuade skeptics in Congress that the national radio network deserves taxpayer support.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2011 | James Rainey
It's been eight months since Juan Williams touched off one of those overwrought media tempests. The jolt to the news ecosystem came when Williams told Fox News' Bill O'Reilly that he felt a certain unease when he saw people in "Muslim garb" on airplanes. Muslim activists cried foul, a modest brawl ensued. It escalated into a full-on slam-dance when NPR, which employed Williams as a news analyst, fired him. Even a lot of the radio network's insiders acknowledge today that management acted peremptorily, canning Williams without a hearing.
OPINION
May 4, 2011 | Steve Oney, Steve Oney is writing a book about the history of NPR
Forty years ago this week, a former television news correspondent inaugurated a momentous era in American journalism by speaking the following words into a microphone: "From National Public Radio in Washington, I'm Robert Conley with 'All Things Considered.'" The opening broadcast of what would become the flagship program of a newsgathering behemoth got off to a rocky start. The lead story wasn't ready. For the first six minutes, Conley ad-libbed. But once the tape made it to the control room and began rolling, listeners heard something they could not have imagined on a commercial network -- a 24-minute audio documentary about a country that seemed to be coming apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2011
Weekend Talk Shows TODAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC The Chris Matthews Show Howard Fineman; Kelly O'Donnell; Clarence Page; Gloria Borger. (N) 5 p.m. KNBC McLaughlin Group (N) 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY Today (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union Budget debate: Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.); Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.). Conflicts in the Middle East: Stephen Hadley, former national security advisor; former Rep. Jane Harman (D-Venice)
OPINION
March 17, 2011 | Meghan Daum
Oh, NPR, won't you please state your game? Are you liberal? Are you neutral? Are your employees secret socialists? Do their screensavers feature slideshows of Noam Chomsky? Do your office Christmas parties serve only free-range eggnog? Do your parking lots offer preferred spaces for vehicles with "Free Tibet" bumper stickers?" Yes? No? Tell us, NPR! Was former fundraising executive Ron Schiller repeating the boardroom chitchat when he was caught on tape trashing the "tea party" and clinging to that chestnut about middle Americans clinging to their guns?
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
The chief executive officer of NPR, Vivian Schiller, has departed following tumult over comments made by a National Public Radio executive about the "tea party. " NPR made the announcement early Wednesday. "It is with deep regret that I tell you that the NPR Board of Directors has accepted the resignation of Vivian Schiller as President and CEO of NPR, effective immediately," the public broadcaster said in a statement. "The Board accepted her resignation with understanding, genuine regret, and great respect for her leadership of NPR these past two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Los Angeles Times
? Vivian Schiller's resignation as president and chief executive of National Public Radio comes at a perilous time for the public broadcaster, as Republicans in Congress press ahead with plans to slice its federal lifeline. Schiller's exit on Wednesday came a day after a video surfaced in which a former NPR fundraising executive derided the "tea party" movement as a collection of "gun-toting" racists and "fundamentalist Christians" who have "hijacked" the Republican Party. He also was quoted saying that the organization could survive "in the long run" without government help.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
Some of the best-known journalists at NPR have released what they call an open letter "to listeners and supporters" that calls remarks made by a former NPR fundraising executive "offensive" and says they have done "real damage" to the public broadcaster. On-air personalities such as Robert Siegel, Scott Simon, Renee Montagne Cokie Roberts and Nina Totenberg, signed the letter, which comes a day after NPR's president and CEO, Vivian Schiller, resigned in the wake of the controversy that erupted after NPR executive Ron Schiller was caught on video by conservative activists denigrating the "tea party" movement.
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