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Juaneno Indians

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1990 | LEN HALL
While the city celebrates the traditional return of the swallows to Mission San Juan Capistrano on Monday, the area's only native Indian tribe plans to stage a protest at the historic mission. The peaceful demonstration on Swallows Day is being organized by Juaneno Tribal Chairman David Belardes to call attention to an ongoing dispute over the replacement of Floyd Nieblas, a 40-year mission employee and its director.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2007 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
Several factions of the Juaneno band of Mission Indians said Monday that they had failed, at least for now, in their bid to gain federal recognition, something the Orange County-based tribe has sought for 25 years. The Juanenos, splintered into factions for more than a decade, failed to meet four of seven criteria required to gain recognition, said an official with one of the factions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Solemnly and reverently, 15 members of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians shared with students at the UC Irvine a part of their heritage: the sacred songs of their Juaneno ancestors. "The songs are gifts to our people," said Rick Mendez, who led the ceremonial singing Thursday for an audience of about 150. "They come from our ancestors or through dreams."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2005 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
Splintered for more than a decade, members of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians have bickered over elections, casino proposals and plans to build athletic fields on their land. But the estimated 4,000 members of the Acjacheman Nation scattered throughout Orange County and other parts of the country may have a compelling reason to become one again: the promise of federal recognition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lillian Robles, a revered elder with the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, has died. She was 84. Robles, who battled developers for decades to protect sacred sites in Southern California, died of cancer Tuesday at her Long Beach home. Every year, she led protesters to pray at housing developments in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Seal Beach that were built on ancient Indian burial sites.
NEWS
November 15, 1995 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Franciscan missionaries who came to San Juan Capistrano to convert the Juaneno Indians to Christianity were religious in their record keeping. Their records of baptisms, weddings and burials--largely unexplored for two centuries--hold a wealth of information about early Orange County, say the three volunteers who have immersed themselves in them for two years. The volunteers are translating the records from old Spanish into English, consolidating the information into one index and alphabetizing it by family name.
NEWS
March 3, 1997 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, who consider themselves the indigenous people of Orange County, first applied for recognition from the U.S. government more than a century ago. Today, with a new century nearing, they still don't have it. Soon, however, the Juanenos may be rewarded with their own equivalent of the Holy Grail, one they and their ancestors have pursued almost as long as the swallows have been returning to Capistrano. But there may be a problem.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the Spaniards, the Mexicans, the Catholic Church and U.S. settlers took away their land and left them homeless, the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians could lay claim to much of Southern California. The ground beneath Disneyland, Camp Pendleton and Mission San Juan Capistrano belonged to them. Many Juanenos are buried under what now are strip malls and parking lots, forgotten long ago in the rush from wilderness to pavement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2000 | KENNETH MA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The remains of a Juaneno Indian teenager who died in the early 1800s were found last week during restoration work at Mission San Juan Capistrano near the Great Stone Church, a mission official said Monday. A mason's assistant found a skull and some teeth about five feet below the surface as workers dug a hole to rinse mortar for the structure, mission director Jerry Miller said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2005 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
Splintered for more than a decade, members of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians have bickered over elections, casino proposals and plans to build athletic fields on their land. But the estimated 4,000 members of the Acjacheman Nation scattered throughout Orange County and other parts of the country may have a compelling reason to become one again: the promise of federal recognition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2003 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
Orange County's newest high school opened Wednesday in San Juan Capistrano, with picketers reminding the uniform-clad students, parents and civic boosters of the controversy surrounding the campus. Junipero Serra High School, five years in the planning, was welcomed by a Juaneno Indian who stood alongside school supporters, and targeted by other Juanenos who protested plans for the school's athletic complex to be built atop ancestral burial grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2003 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
For the second time in seven months, San Juan Capistrano city leaders have approved construction of a Roman Catholic high school's athletic complex on a 29-acre parcel that includes an ancient Juaneno Indian burial ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Juaneno Band of Mission Indians is joining the ranks of those eyeing a piece of the closed El Toro Marine base. The tribe, which has topped a list of finalists for federal recognition status since 1995, includes the 4,700-acre base as part of its historical territory, stretching from Bolsa Chica to Camp Pendleton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lillian Robles, a revered elder with the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, has died. She was 84. Robles, who battled developers for decades to protect sacred sites in Southern California, died of cancer Tuesday at her Long Beach home. Every year, she led protesters to pray at housing developments in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Seal Beach that were built on ancient Indian burial sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2000 | KENNETH MA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The remains of a Juaneno Indian teenager who died in the early 1800s were found last week during restoration work at Mission San Juan Capistrano near the Great Stone Church, a mission official said Monday. A mason's assistant found a skull and some teeth about five feet below the surface as workers dug a hole to rinse mortar for the structure, mission director Jerry Miller said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Macko painstakingly gathered tule reeds by the hundreds, pulling them out of mud in the San Joaquin freshwater marsh in Irvine. He dried and stored them. Then he bundled them together and tied the bundles to create a boat the likes of which California has not seen for hundreds of years. Then he presented it as a gift to Orange County's Juaneno Band of Mission Indians--transporting it in a thoroughly 1990s kind of way. "This is a fantastic gift," said David Belardes, Juaneno tribal chief.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
A two-car caravan California Indians and their supporters who oppose the beatification of Father Junipero Serra began a "spiritual pilgrimage" Saturday, tracing the steps of the 18th-Century Franciscan from Mission San Diego to Mission Carmel on the Monterey Peninsula, where Pope John Paul II is scheduled to visit Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1998 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hidden behind the bamboo groves and bank willows growing along Sulphur Creek, a determined band of treasure seekers gathers weekly to battle the hot sun, buzzing insects and bloodsucking ticks as they patiently pan for precious nuggets of ancient Southern California history. Painstakingly, they scrape and screen earth and sediment in increments of mere centimeters, sometimes millimeters. They jump for joy and shout out the news of the discovery of items as small as a mussel shell or fish bone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Members of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians who had proposed bringing a Las Vegas-style casino to the city told the City Council on Tuesday night that they have changed their minds. "We do not have the intent of putting a casino in San Juan," said Jean Frietze, leader of the faction of Juanenos that had proposed the casino. Mayor David M. Swerdlin had invited residents and the Juanenos to the meeting in hopes of having a discussion about the controversial plan.
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