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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
When Juanita Moore became only the third African American nominated for a supporting-actress Oscar, she made headlines and history - but that's about it. For a year after her 1960 nomination, she didn't work. She never again appeared in a movie as big as "Imitation of Life," or had a role as big as that of Annie Johnson, a black maid whose light-skinned daughter abandons her and renounces her black roots. The nomination made Moore's name long before Oscar-caliber black actresses were given many challenging roles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
When Juanita Moore became only the third African American nominated for a supporting-actress Oscar, she made headlines and history - but that's about it. For a year after her 1960 nomination, she didn't work. She never again appeared in a movie as big as "Imitation of Life," or had a role as big as that of Annie Johnson, a black maid whose light-skinned daughter abandons her and renounces her black roots. The nomination made Moore's name long before Oscar-caliber black actresses were given many challenging roles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2014 | By Chris Lee, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
Juanita Moore, a pioneering African American actress who was nominated for an Academy Award for her role in the classic 1959 drama “Imitation of Life,” has died. The Associated Press reports that Moore collapsed and died at her Los Angeles home Wednesday. Although accounts of the actress' age have differed over the years, her step-grandson, Kirk Kahn, told Variety that she was 99. Moore received her Oscar nomination portraying Lana Turner's best friend and confidant, a housekeeper whose daughter passes for white, in director Douglas Sirk's hit “Imitation of Life.” The film is a subversive masterwork of socially conscious cinema that gained a cultish popularity in later years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2014 | By Chris Lee, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
Juanita Moore, a pioneering African American actress who was nominated for an Academy Award for her role in the classic 1959 drama “Imitation of Life,” has died. The Associated Press reports that Moore collapsed and died at her Los Angeles home Wednesday. Although accounts of the actress' age have differed over the years, her step-grandson, Kirk Kahn, told Variety that she was 99. Moore received her Oscar nomination portraying Lana Turner's best friend and confidant, a housekeeper whose daughter passes for white, in director Douglas Sirk's hit “Imitation of Life.” The film is a subversive masterwork of socially conscious cinema that gained a cultish popularity in later years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2000 | ERIC HARRISON, Eric Harrison is a former Times staff writer
She speaks without a trace of bitterness, no apparent residue from her long years in Hollywood, toiling in a time and place where dark-skinned actors were lucky to get through a casting agent's door, much less land a non-demeaning part. She talks even of her finest hour, and its inevitable disappointing aftermath, with a wistfulness and calm that belie the emotions she must have felt at the time. Who even remembers her name today? Juanita Moore. What movies was she in again?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2009 | SUSAN KING
The glossy, über-melodramatic films of director Douglas Sirk and producer Ross Hunter, which were so popular in the 1950s, are deceptively simple. The glitz, glamour, Dior necklaces and Russell Metty's florid cinematography are a kind of ruse that allowed Sirk to explore such serious issues as sexual mores, class structure and racism. Todd Haynes was significantly influenced by Sirk, especially his 1955 "All That Heaven Allows," in his acclaimed 2002 drama, "Far From Heaven." Directors including the late Rainer Werner Fassbinder and "Inglourious Basterds' " Quentin Tarantino have also tipped their hat to Sirk.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2000
Thank you for remembering Juanita Moore and for the update on her career ("A Hard Lesson From Hollywood's Past," by Eric Harrison, July 9). "Imitation of Life" is a must-see despite the transparent performances of Lana Turner and Sandra Dee. Moore carries the film. I challenge anyone not to cry, nay, bawl, for her character in that film. It is a travesty that she didn't make more films, but I am glad, at least, to hear that she is back and doing well. I hope she realizes that she has affected lives along the way. DONNA PIERSON Long Beach What kind of patronizing, insulting terminology is "moon-pie face" anyway?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
With professional black theater so scarce in Los Angeles (indeed everywhere), even a two-performance revival of James Baldwin's creaky "The Amen Corner" by the Cambridge Players had to be welcome news. True, it was never a great play, but the Broadway version originated in Los Angeles in 1964 in a wildly successful production staged by the late Frank Silvera. Beah Richards rose to stardom in its central role and almost single-handedly carried the play's success on Broadway.
NATIONAL
August 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities offered a reward of up to $25,000 and established a tip line in an attempt to solve the slayings of two Florida civil rights pioneers whose home was blown up on Christmas night in 1951. The investigation into the deaths of Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore has been revived periodically, most recently by Atty. Gen. Charlie Crist.
MAGAZINE
March 1, 1992 | Emil Wilbekin
The old joke about hometowns is that they're nice places to be from . But some people actually have fond memories of their native cities. For instance: Richard Tyler, fashion designer, Los Angeles. Hometown: Melbourne, Australia. "My parents are what I most love about my hometown. But Melbourne itself was great to grow up in because it's a cultural and fashionable city. I did hate the weather, though: It rained a lot."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2009 | SUSAN KING
The glossy, über-melodramatic films of director Douglas Sirk and producer Ross Hunter, which were so popular in the 1950s, are deceptively simple. The glitz, glamour, Dior necklaces and Russell Metty's florid cinematography are a kind of ruse that allowed Sirk to explore such serious issues as sexual mores, class structure and racism. Todd Haynes was significantly influenced by Sirk, especially his 1955 "All That Heaven Allows," in his acclaimed 2002 drama, "Far From Heaven." Directors including the late Rainer Werner Fassbinder and "Inglourious Basterds' " Quentin Tarantino have also tipped their hat to Sirk.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2000 | ERIC HARRISON, Eric Harrison is a former Times staff writer
She speaks without a trace of bitterness, no apparent residue from her long years in Hollywood, toiling in a time and place where dark-skinned actors were lucky to get through a casting agent's door, much less land a non-demeaning part. She talks even of her finest hour, and its inevitable disappointing aftermath, with a wistfulness and calm that belie the emotions she must have felt at the time. Who even remembers her name today? Juanita Moore. What movies was she in again?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Susan King
Director Michael Campus vividly recalls the reaction to his film "The Mack" from the opening-night audience 40 years ago in Oakland. The film, starring Max Julien as the charismatic pimp Goldie and Richard Pryor as his friend Slim, had shot in the Bay Area city. "The first scene came on with Richie and Max and - I am not exaggerating - the whole audience stood up and started screaming back at the screen," Campus said. "They never sat down. No one had shown that world - no one had portrayed the black underworld.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2011 | Susan King, Los Angeles Times
In an interview with the L.A. Times 20 years ago, Sidney Poitier, the first African American superstar and the first to win the lead actor Oscar (for 1963's "Lilies of the Field") discussed the extreme prejudice and hardships faced by African American performers in the 1920s, '30s and '40s. "The guys who were forerunners to me, like Canada Lee, Rex Ingram, Clarence Muse and women like Hattie McDaniel, Louise Beavers and Juanita Moore, they were terribly boxed in," Poitier said then.
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