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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2003
I was greatly dismayed to see the story about the disappearing women of Juarez in the Calendar section ("Vanished," by Anne-Marie O'Connor, Oct. 31). While you may have run the story to coincide with the presentation by Eve Ensler and others at UCLA, or even to highlight the Day of the Dead, I find it appalling that you chose to present the story as if it were some kind of murder mystery, relegated to the pages of "Style & Culture." For the hundreds of murdered women in Juarez, and for all of their friends and family, every day is Day of the Dead, and there's nothing stylish about it. Samantha Ott Highland Park
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
We know too much about Mexico's drug war and not enough. We hear about it constantly, about the 60,000 murders and the slaughter of innocents, but getting a sense of what that means on the ground - and how pervasive its cultural influence is - is harder to come by. The potent documentary "Narco Cultura" is an excellent place to start. This dispassionate but devastating film looks at the drug wars from two very different but chillingly complementary perspectives. As directed and shot by Shaul Schwarz, an accomplished photojournalist who spent two years in this world as a still photographer before starting to film, "Narco Cultura" benefits from the access Schwarz earned through his time on the ground.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
We know too much about Mexico's drug war and not enough. We hear about it constantly, about the 60,000 murders and the slaughter of innocents, but getting a sense of what that means on the ground - and how pervasive its cultural influence is - is harder to come by. The potent documentary "Narco Cultura" is an excellent place to start. This dispassionate but devastating film looks at the drug wars from two very different but chillingly complementary perspectives. As directed and shot by Shaul Schwarz, an accomplished photojournalist who spent two years in this world as a still photographer before starting to film, "Narco Cultura" benefits from the access Schwarz earned through his time on the ground.
WORLD
November 18, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- For the second time in two months, the Mexican border city of Juarez is reeling from a harrowing massacre, the victims this time a religious family of eight, including three children, whose bound, lifeless bodies were found with multiple stab wounds, according to state officials and local media reports. The victims, discovered Sunday, include two girls, ages 4 and 6; a 7-year-old boy; three women, ages 25, 30 and 60; and two men, ages 30 and 40, according to the Chihuahua prosecutor's office.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1988 | VICTOR VALLE, Times Staff Writer
"Juarez," which was to have been the first dramatic TV series with a predominantly Latino cast, was shelved this week by ABC without ever having been aired, prompting one leader of a local Latino arts organization to call for a letter-writing campaign in protest. ABC spokesman Bob Wright cited scheduling changes and "creative differences" for the cancellation. Two episodes for "Juarez" had been completed and three others had been ordered.
NEWS
January 30, 1987
Almost two dozen highly explosive U.S. air-to-ground rockets were unknowingly sold to a junk dealer in Juarez, Mexico, and are in the possession of the Mexican army, a spokesman at Ft. Bliss in El Paso said. Lt. Col. James Lawson said the 23 rockets apparently were accidentally left in wooden crates sold to Pedro Salas of Juarez, who regularly salvages items from Ft. Bliss. U.S.
NEWS
July 24, 1988
Mexican law officers stalking drug traffickers mistakenly shot and killed a Juarez television newscaster, her mother-in-law and a friend, authorities said. Police mistook the journalist's car for one spotted near the crash site of a plane believed to have been ferrying cocaine, the official Notimex news agency reported. XHIJ-TV said its anchorwoman, Linda Bejarano, 28, was killed along with Lucresia Martinez de Gomez, 58, and Carlos Alfonso Garcia, 25.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1988
Being an American is having a choice in everything that matters to me. I am not a Nazi or communist. If I want to pledge anything it will be my decision, and not the Supreme Court or anyone else who will tell when to say it. The best way of pledging allegiance to the flag is to be a good American, serve your country and be loyal. FRANCISCO JUAREZ JR. Long Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2008 | Charles Ornstein
A 9-year-old boy was found safe in Mexico on Sunday, four days after his father allegedly shot his estranged wife in the face and abducted the boy, officials from the Orange County Sheriff's Department said. Lonnie Ramos dropped off his son, Ryan, at a church in Juarez, sheriff's spokesman Jim Amormino said. Ryan was in the custody of U.S. marshals Sunday night and was to be taken to El Paso, where a jet was waiting to take him home. -- -- Charles Ornstein
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
A San Bernardino County physician's assistant who pleaded guilty to illegally distributing a widely abused painkiller was sentenced Tuesday to 14 years in federal prison. Christopher Henry Lister, 51, of Victorville ran a mobile health clinic called Lister's Mobile Health Services, and sold prescriptions for OxyContin to "street-level" drug dealers, prosecutors alleged in court papers. Lister pleaded guilty in November to one count of conspiracy to distribute and attempt to distribute oxycodone, the generic name for OxyContin, according to a plea agreement filed in U.S. District Court in Riverside.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - At his peak, Mexican drug lord Juan Juarez Orosco allegedly oversaw the distribution of 8 tons of cocaine every month from Colombia to the United States, making him one of the most wanted narcotics traffickers in the world, authorities said. On Wednesday, federal prosecutors revealed that the 64-year-old Juarez, known as "El Abuelo," or "the Grandfather," was in U.S. custody after his arrest in Panama and extradition to New York. Charged in U.S. federal court with running an international cocaine network, Juarez faces life in prison if convicted.
WORLD
November 10, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Usually, human rights activists and victims are on the same side of a conflict. But the case of Israel Arzate has put the two allies in opposite camps in Mexico, a reflection of how the absence of justice distorts reality in this violent country. Arzate, 28, was one of a small handful of people formally accused by authorities of perpetrating one of the most notorious massacres in recent Mexican history. Fifteen mostly young people were shot to death as they celebrated a soccer victory in the border city of Ciudad Juarez in January 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Hawthorne Mayor Daniel Juarez was charged with four counts of perjury Thursday, marking the latest allegations the city leader has faced in connection with campaign financing. Juarez, 60, is expected to surrender to authorities and be arraigned in Los Angeles' airport courthouse Thursday afternoon. If convicted, he could be removed from office, officials said. The mayor was previously indicted on perjury charges in October. The new charges against Juarez stem from an investigation into that case, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
Reyes Juarez was on his way home from his job at a jewelry store in Whittier two years ago when he was stopped at a police checkpoint. Officers were looking for intoxicated or unlicensed drivers. Juarez produced his car's registration and evidence of insurance, but as an undocumented immigrant from Mexico, he did not have a license. He was handed a $600 ticket, and a tow truck hauled away his Ford Escort for a 30-day sentence in an impound lot. Juarez was one of several immigrants who spoke out at a news conference Wednesday against impoundments of unlicensed drivers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2013 | By Thomas Curwen, Los Angeles Times
WATSONVILLE, Calif. - She introduced herself as Sarani Hernandez and said in Spanish that she needed help. She took a seat in the lobby of the police station. Officer Elizabeth Sousa was asked to talk to her. It was a quiet morning a few days after Thanksgiving. She listened as the woman began telling the story of an abduction. Her two boys were being held in Juarez, Mexico, she said; they were U.S. citizens. Hernandez opened her cellphone to a picture of Edwin and Angel, sent as evidence they were still alive.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
A San Bernardino County physician's assistant who pleaded guilty to illegally distributing a widely abused painkiller was sentenced Tuesday to 14 years in federal prison. Christopher Henry Lister, 51, of Victorville ran a mobile health clinic called Lister's Mobile Health Services, and sold prescriptions for OxyContin to "street-level" drug dealers, prosecutors alleged in court papers. Lister pleaded guilty in November to one count of conspiracy to distribute and attempt to distribute oxycodone, the generic name for OxyContin, according to a plea agreement filed in U.S. District Court in Riverside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
Reyes Juarez was on his way home from his job at a jewelry store in Whittier two years ago when he was stopped at a police checkpoint. Officers were looking for intoxicated or unlicensed drivers. Juarez produced his car's registration and evidence of insurance, but as an undocumented immigrant from Mexico, he did not have a license. He was handed a $600 ticket, and a tow truck hauled away his Ford Escort for a 30-day sentence in an impound lot. Juarez was one of several immigrants who spoke out at a news conference Wednesday against impoundments of unlicensed drivers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2010 | By Michael OrdoƱa, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In "Inhale," Dermot Mulroney plays a New Mexico prosecutor who decides to go outside the law ? far outside ? to try to save his daughter's life. The film ultimately brings the protagonist face to face with a dire moral dilemma. "The big turn in my character is when you see him going from law-abiding citizen to lawbreaker," says the actor, who turns 47 later this month, acknowledging that being a dad made it "not that big a leap" to understand his character's actions. "The debate over what I would have done in that circumstance is still being played out. I won't say there's not a right or wrong answer, but there's no easy way to answer it. " In the movie, upstanding citizen Paul Stanton (Mulroney)
WORLD
November 8, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - An alleged local commander of the Zetas paramilitary cartel in the troubled border state of Coahuila has been captured, the Mexican navy announced Thursday, expressing hope that he might lead authorities to the notorious group's remaining top leader. Said Omar Juarez was taken into custody on a prominent street in Saltillo, Coahuila's capital, the navy said in a statement released as the suspect was presented to reporters in Mexico City. In his possession were weapons and packages containing what may be cocaine and marijuana, the statement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
The mayor of Hawthorne has been indicted for allegedly failing to disclose that he receiveda cash payment from the owner of a local gymnasium, the third elected official in the South Bay city to be accused of criminal activity in the last five years. Billed as a reform candidate after the city's previous mayor was arrested for stealing an industrial-size food mixer from the local school district, Mayor Daniel Juarez took $2,000 from the owner of a Gold's Gym and deposited the money in his personal checking account, the indictment alleges.
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