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Juarez

WORLD
February 19, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The slaughter last month of at least 15 young people with no apparent criminal ties has galvanized the Mexican public in ways not seen here in more than three years of bloody drug warfare and has forced the government to enact long-resisted policy changes to combat violence. Some in Mexico are wondering whether this is their nation's tipping point, a moment when public outrage that has bubbled along finally overcomes the fear and fatalism that largely silenced or intimidated Mexican society.
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WORLD
February 12, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Facing intense political pressure and demands that he resign, President Felipe Calderon traveled Thursday to Mexico's deadliest city to defend his troubled fight against drug cartels, which critics charge has only intensified the violence. Angry crowds greeted Calderon as he arrived in a heavily guarded Ciudad Juarez. The president said it was time to launch a much-discussed expansion of the drug war to include efforts aimed at tackling social issues, such as unemployment and addiction.
WORLD
February 4, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
Last weekend's massacre of at least 15 people at a teen party in Ciudad Juarez was horrifying enough. Then the authorities got involved. Mexican officials have issued sketchy and conflicting information, including a death toll that went down. They initially said they were at a loss to explain why gunmen would open fire on decent kids in a private home. Then they produced a suspect who said the attack was part of a feud between drug-trafficking gangs, suggesting that at least some of those targeted weren't so decent after all. When family members exploded with indignation, authorities backpedaled.
WORLD
February 3, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
Authorities in the border city of Ciudad Juarez said on Tuesday night that they had arrested a man suspected of taking part in a shooting attack on a high-school party that killed at least 15 people early Sunday. Officials summoned reporters to see the suspect, who said in their presence that the main Juarez-based drug cartel targeted the party because it had received reports that members of a rival trafficking group were in attendance. The suspect, identified as Jose Dolores Arroyo Chavarria, said he acted as a lookout for the 24 or so gunmen he said took part.
WORLD
February 1, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
Gunmen stormed a party packed with teenage revelers in Ciudad Juarez early Sunday, killing at least 14 people in the latest spasm of violence to slam the border city, authorities said. Officials in the northern state of Chihuahua said high school students and others were at a private home celebrating a school soccer victory when armed men rolled up in seven vehicles and opened fire. At least eight of the dead were younger than 20, officials said. The youngest confirmed victim was 13. At least 14 people were reported wounded.
WORLD
February 1, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
Authorities in Ciudad Juarez said Monday that they have no idea what motivated a weekend shooting attack against a group of young partygoers that killed at least 16 people in the border city. The death toll rose from 14 after two more victims died Monday from wounds suffered during the assault, in which gunmen in seven vehicles sealed off the street and opened fire on a party packed with teenagers. More than a dozen people were wounded during the attack around midnight Saturday.
WORLD
January 8, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Human rights organizations launched a series of protest marches Thursday in the border city of Ciudad Juarez to demand justice in the slaying of a prominent activist who had vociferously criticized alleged abuses by the Mexican military. The activist, Josefina Reyes, was among a group of human rights advocates who for a year have been protesting what they call the militarization of Juarez, Mexico's deadliest city, where more than 2,500 people were killed in 2009. The government of President Felipe Calderon poured thousands of army and federal police troops into Juarez to fight powerful drug gangs, but the killing has only soared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2009 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Esther Chavez, a vocal champion of human rights who against enormous odds drew attention to the killings and rapes of hundreds of women in the violent border city of Juarez, has died. She was 76. Chavez died early Christmas morning of cancer, her hometown newspaper El Diario reported Saturday on its website. Chavez is widely acknowledged as a pioneer, the first activist to document and decry the 1990s murders of several hundred women. Most were young, poor workers in U.S.-owned assembly plants in the border city whose deaths were largely ignored by authorities.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2009 | By Tracy Wilkinson
To say the topic of screenwriter Sabina Berman's latest movie is bleak would be an understatement. So would labeling the decision to film in Mexico's deadliest city a "challenge." The film, "Backyard" ("El Traspatio") is a fictionalized account of the unsolved rapes and murders of hundreds of women in Ciudad Juarez, the violent Mexican border town that faces El Paso. Berman, a writer most known for comedies, had to be convinced the project made sense; she was sold after years of research and talking to survivors and some of the thousands of women who work in the vast network of multinational maquiladora assembly plants along the U.S.-Mexico border that served as the pool for victims.
WORLD
December 11, 2009 | By Ken Ellingwood
Mexico violated human rights conventions by failing to properly investigate the killings of three young women in 2001 during a now-infamous wave of slayings in the border city of Ciudad Juarez, an international tribunal decided in a ruling released Thursday. The Inter-American Court of Human Rights ordered the Mexican government to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages to the families of the three victims and directed authorities to take other steps aimed at acknowledging their failings and finding the killers.
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