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NEWS
January 14, 1996 | MOHAMED OSMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thousands here fled the horrors of Sudan's civil war. Some even sought refuge in graveyards, growing food in the cemeteries of Juba, where the more unfortunate were buried. The once-prosperous city was a symbol of an unending conflict: cargo planes bringing in scant relief, shells crashing down from rebel artillery, hundreds of thousands of refugees streaming into a city redolent of death. Today, Juba is no longer a symbol of the war. It's an oasis.
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WORLD
March 1, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan - South Sudan was one of the most ambitious state-building projects that global donors have ever undertaken: Take a newly minted, resource-rich country with some of the world's worst poverty, health and education problems, pour in aid, assistance and diplomatic advice and hope for the best. Instead, the African nation descended into ethnic warfare and chaos in December, less than three years after it won independence. Some now question the wisdom of the U.S. and others in pouring billions of dollars into a place long-racked by staggering corruption, poor governance and ethnic violence.
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WORLD
July 9, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Garang Yai was 7 when government soldiers burned down his village, forcing him to flee to Ethiopia, a three-month walk that many of his fellow refugees didn't survive. One of the famous "Lost Boys," Yai eventually found refuge in the United States. Now a U.S. citizen, he lives in Virginia and works as a university custodian. Photos: Independence celebration Yai, 31, flew back to Sudan this week to celebrate an occasion that has drawn thousands of exiles like him: the independence of the Republic of South Sudan after a generations-long war that left more than 2 million people dead.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Despite peace talks under way in Ethiopia, government forces and rebels in South Sudan continued fighting for control of key oil-producing venues, driving more people to flee their homes to escape the deadly clashes. More than 250 people drowned when an overloaded boat capsized while fleeing the Upper Nile state capital of Malakal as rebel forces were said to be advancing on the oil town, the Nigeria Guardian reported. "The boat drowned with about 255 people on board -- only two children have been rescued," Upper Nile state Information Minister Philip Jiben was quoted by the newspaper as saying.
WORLD
July 10, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
The countdown clock ran out, the flag ascended over the fledgling capital and a new nation born from Africa's longest civil war and the deaths of 2 million people joined the world. The mood in Juba was euphoric Saturday as the Republic of South Sudan formally declared its independence from the north, its bitter antagonist for generations. For the day, at least, a people weary of conflict were willing to ignore that their nation came into being as one the world's most troubled states.
WORLD
January 14, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Sparks flew as blacksmiths fanned fires and Stephen Jada, a welder with ambitions far larger than his tin shack, rested in the shade and spoke of how this gritty, once forgotten sliver of the world was about to blossom. "A new nation," he declared, "is being born to be equal with other countries. There is much to be done. " He looked down an alley of tools and rust and listened to the hiss of blowtorches, the bite of hacksaws. Men around him hammered and sweated. Women sold beans and shooed children along bamboo fences not far from families scrubbing clothes in the Nile.
NEWS
July 26, 1986 | United Press International
Catholic missionaries and diplomats in Nairobi said Friday that they received word of the release of two American nuns captured Monday by rebels in civil war-torn southern Sudan. A spokeswoman for Nairobi's Maryknoll mission said she received a message that Sister Sean Underwood, 43, a Medical Mission of Mary pilot from New Hampshire, and Sister Nancy Lyons, 49, a Maryknoll nurse, were released Thursday afternoon. A diplomat in Nairobi said he received a similar message.
WORLD
December 17, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Amro Hassan
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Dozens of soldiers were killed as clashes continued for a second day in the South Sudanese capital of Juba, as more than 13,000 civilians took refuge at a U.N. peacekeepers' base. The fragile state is confronting its greatest crisis since independence in 2011, after clashes erupted late Sunday and President Salva Kiir accused his rival and former deputy, Riek Machar, of launching a coup attempt. Kiir swapped his trademark American cowboy hat for military fatigues when he made Monday's television address.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- South Sudan President Salva Kiir announced an overnight curfew for civilians Monday after what he characterized as a failed coup attempt. Barrages of gunfire broke out at two presidential guard barracks in the capital, Juba, in the early hours of the morning amid suspicions that a coup attempt was triggered by a faction of soldiers loyal to Kiir's former deputy, Riek Machar. Witnesses confirmed that heavy machine guns and mortars were used. Several people were reported wounded, and hundreds of others sought refuge at United Nations facilities in Juba.
OPINION
February 28, 2011
These are heady days. Across the Middle East and North Africa, hundreds of thousands of angry citizens have taken to the streets, calling for freedom, insisting that dictators step aside and demanding a voice in their own destinies. But even as extraordinary change roils the region, it is important to remember that deposing a dictator and shucking off the ancien regime does not lead inexorably or immediately to democracy. Think of France in 1789 or Russia in 1917 or Iran in 1979.
WORLD
December 24, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The United Nations Security Council voted Tuesday to send 5,000 more troops to South Sudan to tackle a wave of ethnic and political violence that has killed hundreds of people, perhaps thousands, and driven at least 81,000 from their homes. The action by the world body will boost the U.N. troop presence to 12,500, as soon as peacekeepers can be redeployed from other African missions for the temporary buildup. The extra troops, as well as more than 400 more U.N. police, are expected to temporarily transfer to South Sudan from missions in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Darfur region in neighboring Sudan, Ivory Coast and Liberia.
WORLD
December 21, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
HONOLULU - President Obama warned Saturday that using military force to gain power in South Sudan could cost the country international support. Obama was reacting to reports that four U.S. service members were wounded when South Sudanese militias fired on three U.S. military aircraft on a mission to evacuate American citizens. He encouraged talks to help end the violence in South Sudan. “Any effort to seize power through the use of military force will result in the end of longstanding support from the United States and the international community,” the president said, according to White House officials.
WORLD
December 17, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Amro Hassan
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Dozens of soldiers were killed as clashes continued for a second day in the South Sudanese capital of Juba, as more than 13,000 civilians took refuge at a U.N. peacekeepers' base. The fragile state is confronting its greatest crisis since independence in 2011, after clashes erupted late Sunday and President Salva Kiir accused his rival and former deputy, Riek Machar, of launching a coup attempt. Kiir swapped his trademark American cowboy hat for military fatigues when he made Monday's television address.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- South Sudan President Salva Kiir announced an overnight curfew for civilians Monday after what he characterized as a failed coup attempt. Barrages of gunfire broke out at two presidential guard barracks in the capital, Juba, in the early hours of the morning amid suspicions that a coup attempt was triggered by a faction of soldiers loyal to Kiir's former deputy, Riek Machar. Witnesses confirmed that heavy machine guns and mortars were used. Several people were reported wounded, and hundreds of others sought refuge at United Nations facilities in Juba.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Posthumus, the protagonist of Shakespeare's "Cymbeline," marched through the Herculean columns of the Globe theater, stopped abruptly at the front of the stage and looked up at an audience of hundreds - most of whom didn't speak a whisper of the language they were about to hear. His voice boomed, and he raised his arms and curled his hands into fists. "All these people have come from the newest country in the world," shouted actor Francis Paulino Lugali in Juba Arabic, "and this country is South Sudan!"
WORLD
March 22, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
  With a gnarled hand, the elderly widow picks up a rock and taps it with another rock until it shatters. Then she tosses the pebbles into a small pile. The tap-tap of stone on stone echoes like drips in a cave as women pound stones to pebbles in the blasting heat of Rock City, on the outskirts of Juba, capital of the new nation of South Sudan. Davidka Clement made the long trek to Juba from her village a few years ago. She had heard that South Sudan, which fought for decades for independence from Sudan, would soon become an independent country with its own leaders, who would care about people like her. The country became a reality in July, to momentous celebration, but it changed nothing for Clement or the other pebble women of Rock City.
WORLD
December 21, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
HONOLULU - President Obama warned Saturday that using military force to gain power in South Sudan could cost the country international support. Obama was reacting to reports that four U.S. service members were wounded when South Sudanese militias fired on three U.S. military aircraft on a mission to evacuate American citizens. He encouraged talks to help end the violence in South Sudan. “Any effort to seize power through the use of military force will result in the end of longstanding support from the United States and the international community,” the president said, according to White House officials.
WORLD
July 10, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
The countdown clock ran out, the flag ascended over the fledgling capital and a new nation born from Africa's longest civil war and the deaths of 2 million people joined the world. The mood in Juba was euphoric Saturday as the Republic of South Sudan formally declared its independence from the north, its bitter antagonist for generations. For the day, at least, a people weary of conflict were willing to ignore that their nation came into being as one the world's most troubled states.
WORLD
July 9, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Garang Yai was 7 when government soldiers burned down his village, forcing him to flee to Ethiopia, a three-month walk that many of his fellow refugees didn't survive. One of the famous "Lost Boys," Yai eventually found refuge in the United States. Now a U.S. citizen, he lives in Virginia and works as a university custodian. Photos: Independence celebration Yai, 31, flew back to Sudan this week to celebrate an occasion that has drawn thousands of exiles like him: the independence of the Republic of South Sudan after a generations-long war that left more than 2 million people dead.
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