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Judas Iscariot

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NEWS
April 21, 2000 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
He is the exemplar of treachery, the shadow defined by Light. To this day his name--Judas Iscariot--remains a synonym for betrayal. But what if the traditional understanding of Judas is actually a distortion? What if he is actually a victim of a sort of theological libel--a 1st century bad press--that helped create two millenniums of Christian anti-Semitism? As Christians observe Good Friday, New Testament scholars are reexamining Judas' role in the fateful events that led to Jesus' crucifixion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | Philip Brandes, F. Kathleen Foley, David C. Nichols
Classical theology collides with ironic modernism in "The Last Days of Judas Iscariot," but seriousness of purpose is never in doubt as Stephen Adly Guirgis' metaphysical courtroom drama uses Judas to grapple with questions of faith, dogma and morality. An ambitious 68 Cent Crew Theatre Company staging honors Guirgis' talent for contemporary -- albeit heady -- framing of philosophical issues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
Legal battles are all too common these days for the Roman Catholic Church, but Stephen Adly Guirgis' courtroom drama confronts religion in an unexpected way. Can the man who betrayed Christ be redeemed by a feisty defense attorney who won't take no for an answer? Folks, we may have finally found a case to silence Judge Judy.
SCIENCE
April 7, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Judas Iscariot, long reviled as history's quintessential betrayer, was actually the best friend of Jesus and turned him over to authorities only because Jesus asked him to, according to the Gospel of Judas, a long-lost document revealed Thursday. The manuscript, which scientists date to the year 300, is an account of conversations between Jesus and Judas in the last week of their lives -- conversations in which Jesus is said to have shared religious secrets not known by the other disciples.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1988
Shame on Michael Granberry for writing, and The Times for printing ("Shop's Memories Are Wall to Wall and Cover to Cover," March 12), that Richard Nixon, Fidel Castro, Mary Martin, Lauren Bacall are "stars or world leaders . . . best forgotten." Surely he didn't mean to say this. For very good reasons, even persons such as Hitler and Judas Iscariot must not be forgotten. ROBERT W. KING San Marcos
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1987
Bush has assumed the role of prophet. He avers that future generations will lionize and make a hero out of North. Future history may be his to foretell, but it is obvious that he knows little about past history. Where in history does he find one all but being canonized by negating the oath to which you swore, withholding vital information to the President of your nation, by lying to the Senate and through them to the whole nation, by being party to selling war material which wasn't theirs to a nation which violated international law by storming an embassy and holding all its personnel hostage for months, by using proceeds from such sales to subsidize a civil war that the majority of his own nation disapprove, and by being party to the idea that it's all right to set up a system of law outside the established laws of the land?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000
Times religion writer Larry Stammer presents an interesting case for viewing Judas as a collaborator with Jesus in the events leading to the crucifixion, rather than as his betrayer ('New Look at Ancient Betrayer," April 21). Some might see this as a way of resurrecting the reputation of Judas, appropriately at Easter. If Judas was a friend of Jesus rather than his betrayer, it makes his final act one of nobility rather than treachery. However, in this case, Judas no longer stands as a symbol of hope for those who desperately need the grace of forgiveness, a point which I make in my book, "The Gospel According to Judas: Is There a Limit to God's Forgiveness?
SCIENCE
April 7, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Judas Iscariot, long reviled as history's quintessential betrayer, was actually the best friend of Jesus and turned him over to authorities only because Jesus asked him to, according to the Gospel of Judas, a long-lost document revealed Thursday. The manuscript, which scientists date to the year 300, is an account of conversations between Jesus and Judas in the last week of their lives -- conversations in which Jesus is said to have shared religious secrets not known by the other disciples.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Director Martin Scorsese will start filming his long-delayed film version of Nikos Kazantzakis' "The Last Temptation of Christ" next month in Morocco, Daily Variety reported Monday. The unconventional treatment of the life of Christ stars Willem Dafoe as Jesus, Barbara Hershey as Mary Magdalene, Sting as Pontius Pilate and Harvey Keitel as Judas Iscariot. Scorsese was within weeks of filming when Paramount pulled the plug in 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
Delfeayo Marsalis, the 27-year-old trombonist and composer, was in town during the weekend, leading a sextet Friday and Saturday at the Jazz Bakery. What Branford and Wynton have accomplished for the saxophone and trumpet, the younger brother seems to have achieved on the trombone. His sometimes fierce, burning flurries at up-tempos contrast with a ballad personality that adjusts itself lyrically to "Misty" and "But Beautiful."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000
Times religion writer Larry Stammer presents an interesting case for viewing Judas as a collaborator with Jesus in the events leading to the crucifixion, rather than as his betrayer ('New Look at Ancient Betrayer," April 21). Some might see this as a way of resurrecting the reputation of Judas, appropriately at Easter. If Judas was a friend of Jesus rather than his betrayer, it makes his final act one of nobility rather than treachery. However, in this case, Judas no longer stands as a symbol of hope for those who desperately need the grace of forgiveness, a point which I make in my book, "The Gospel According to Judas: Is There a Limit to God's Forgiveness?
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
He is the exemplar of treachery, the shadow defined by Light. To this day his name--Judas Iscariot--remains a synonym for betrayal. But what if the traditional understanding of Judas is actually a distortion? What if he is actually a victim of a sort of theological libel--a 1st century bad press--that helped create two millenniums of Christian anti-Semitism? As Christians observe Good Friday, New Testament scholars are reexamining Judas' role in the fateful events that led to Jesus' crucifixion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1988
Shame on Michael Granberry for writing, and The Times for printing ("Shop's Memories Are Wall to Wall and Cover to Cover," March 12), that Richard Nixon, Fidel Castro, Mary Martin, Lauren Bacall are "stars or world leaders . . . best forgotten." Surely he didn't mean to say this. For very good reasons, even persons such as Hitler and Judas Iscariot must not be forgotten. ROBERT W. KING San Marcos
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1987
Bush has assumed the role of prophet. He avers that future generations will lionize and make a hero out of North. Future history may be his to foretell, but it is obvious that he knows little about past history. Where in history does he find one all but being canonized by negating the oath to which you swore, withholding vital information to the President of your nation, by lying to the Senate and through them to the whole nation, by being party to selling war material which wasn't theirs to a nation which violated international law by storming an embassy and holding all its personnel hostage for months, by using proceeds from such sales to subsidize a civil war that the majority of his own nation disapprove, and by being party to the idea that it's all right to set up a system of law outside the established laws of the land?
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