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Judas Priest Music Group

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The judge's verdict is all that remains in the multimillion-dollar product-liability suit against the British rock group Judas Priest after final arguments were concluded Friday in a Reno courtroom. Washoe District Judge Jerry Carr Whitehead said he expects to issue his ruling by Friday. The unprecedented product-liability lawsuit, which charges the heavy-metal quintet with causing the suicide attempts of two Sparks, Nev., youths in 1985, has drawn international attention.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990
I would like to thank The Times for its article on our neonatal tortoise research at California State University, Dominguez Hills. Unfortunately, one statement, "The tortoises under study . . . eventually will be set free in the desert," does need correction. An early draft of our study plan (provided to The Times) did make reference to a now-abandoned reintroduction project. In fact, no captive tortoises will be released into natural habitats.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aunetta Roberson and Phyllis Vance lived in the same suburb for years. Their husbands frequented the same casinos. Their sons attended--and dropped out of--the same school. Outside of a few phone calls related to academic or legal problems their sons encountered, however, the women's lives rarely crossed. About the only thing they had in common was their mutual hatred for the loud heavy-metal music that their sons played for hours in the sons' rooms. Yet on Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Attorneys for the families of two youths who attempted suicide after listening to an album by the British rock band Judas Priest say they will challenge a judge's ruling that absolved the group of responsibility. Attorney Vivian Lynch said that she and co-counsel Ken McKenna would file post-trial motions by Tuesday to challenge the court's decision. "These usually aren't granted and, if not, I will appeal" to the Nevada Supreme Court, said Lynch, who represented one of the families.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday's Judas Priest verdict--which absolved the British heavy metal quintet and their record company, CBS Records, from responsibility for the suicide attempts of two Nevada youths--is being perceived by the music industry as a Pyrrhic victory at best. Industry observers expressed concerns that the costly legal battle preceding the ruling may have intensified the debate over artistic expression.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990
I would like to thank The Times for its article on our neonatal tortoise research at California State University, Dominguez Hills. Unfortunately, one statement, "The tortoises under study . . . eventually will be set free in the desert," does need correction. An early draft of our study plan (provided to The Times) did make reference to a now-abandoned reintroduction project. In fact, no captive tortoises will be released into natural habitats.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1990
I've just lost a tremendous amount of respect and confidence in veteran reporter Fred Francis and the television network he works for. Mr. Francis contends that "Die Hard 2" reporter Richard Thornberg is an "unbelievable" character. Unlike the rest of America, Mr. Francis apparently remains clueless to the fact that the movie--unlike the events of real life which Mr. Francis reports on--is entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
How do you prove something exists if it cannot be seen or heard? That's the challenge facing attorneys Timothy Post, Ken McKenna and Vivian Lynch. They represent the families of two Sparks youths, Raymond Belknap, 18, and James Vance, 20, who shot themselves on Dec. 23, 1985, after an afternoon of drinking beer, smoking pot and listening to the music of Judas Priest. Belknap died instantly. Vance survived the suicide attempt but died three years later, allegedly due to related complications.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1990 | From United Press International
A young man who entered into a suicide pact after listening to hours of the albums of the British rock group Judas Priest believed the music influenced his actions, a psychiatrist testified Friday. Dr. Bruce Tanenbaum said that James Vance "didn't care if he ever got a dime from the lawsuit" against Judas Priest and CBS Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two young men did not kill themselves because they heard alleged subliminal messages in the heavy metal music of Judas Priest, a judge in Reno, Nev., ruled on Friday. Judas Priest vocalist Rob Halford called the ruling a victory for rock 'n' roll. "It's a great day for Judas Priest. It's a great day for heavy metal and artistic expression," Halford said in a telephone interview from Mexico, where he is vacationing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two young men did not kill themselves because they heard alleged subliminal messages in the heavy metal music of Judas Priest, a judge in Reno, Nev., ruled on Friday. Judas Priest vocalist Rob Halford called the ruling a victory for rock 'n' roll. "It's a great day for Judas Priest. It's a great day for heavy metal and artistic expression," Halford said in a telephone interview from Mexico, where he is vacationing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday's Judas Priest verdict--which absolved the British heavy metal quintet and their record company, CBS Records, from responsibility for the suicide attempts of two Nevada youths--is being perceived by the music industry as a Pyrrhic victory at best. Industry observers expressed concerns that the costly legal battle preceding the ruling may have intensified the debate over artistic expression.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The judge's verdict is all that remains in the multimillion-dollar product-liability suit against the British rock group Judas Priest after final arguments were concluded Friday in a Reno courtroom. Washoe District Judge Jerry Carr Whitehead said he expects to issue his ruling by Friday. The unprecedented product-liability lawsuit, which charges the heavy-metal quintet with causing the suicide attempts of two Sparks, Nev., youths in 1985, has drawn international attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aunetta Roberson and Phyllis Vance lived in the same suburb for years. Their husbands frequented the same casinos. Their sons attended--and dropped out of--the same school. Outside of a few phone calls related to academic or legal problems their sons encountered, however, the women's lives rarely crossed. About the only thing they had in common was their mutual hatred for the loud heavy-metal music that their sons played for hours in the sons' rooms. Yet on Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
How do you prove something exists if it cannot be seen or heard? That's the challenge facing attorneys Timothy Post, Ken McKenna and Vivian Lynch. They represent the families of two Sparks youths, Raymond Belknap, 18, and James Vance, 20, who shot themselves on Dec. 23, 1985, after an afternoon of drinking beer, smoking pot and listening to the music of Judas Priest. Belknap died instantly. Vance survived the suicide attempt but died three years later, allegedly due to related complications.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Even if the attorneys for the parents of the two dead youths can prove that subliminal messages exist on Judas Priest's "Stained Class" album, Washoe District Judge Jerry Carr Whitehead must still decide whether those messages were a legal cause of the shootings. Whitehead, who is hearing the case without a jury, ruled in August that the music and the words on the album are protected from liability by the First Amendment.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Attorneys for the families of two youths who attempted suicide after listening to an album by the British rock band Judas Priest say they will challenge a judge's ruling that absolved the group of responsibility. Attorney Vivian Lynch said that she and co-counsel Ken McKenna would file post-trial motions by Tuesday to challenge the court's decision. "These usually aren't granted and, if not, I will appeal" to the Nevada Supreme Court, said Lynch, who represented one of the families.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As lead singer of veteran British heavy-metal band Judas Priest, Rob Halford is used to being photographed and signing autographs. But that's usually backstage at one of the group's head-banging concerts. For the past two weeks, Halford, 38, has been approached by fans in a place he never expected to be: the steps of the Washoe County Courthouse, where his band is being blamed in the deaths of two local youths.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1990 | From United Press International
A young man who entered into a suicide pact after listening to hours of the albums of the British rock group Judas Priest believed the music influenced his actions, a psychiatrist testified Friday. Dr. Bruce Tanenbaum said that James Vance "didn't care if he ever got a dime from the lawsuit" against Judas Priest and CBS Records.
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