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Judd Nelson

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October 2, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Judd Nelson thinks he got the wrong idea from working with John Hughes on the writer-director's seminal 1985 teen angst drama "The Breakfast Club. " "I thought all movies were going to be collaborative and have rehearsals and have a director who liked us," said Nelson. His smoldering performance as high school bad boy John Bender made Nelson an overnight sensation and a full-fledged member of the Brat Pack along with his "Breakfast Club" costars Emilio Estevez, Ally Sheedy, Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Judd Nelson thinks he got the wrong idea from working with John Hughes on the writer-director's seminal 1985 teen angst drama "The Breakfast Club. " "I thought all movies were going to be collaborative and have rehearsals and have a director who liked us," said Nelson. His smoldering performance as high school bad boy John Bender made Nelson an overnight sensation and a full-fledged member of the Brat Pack along with his "Breakfast Club" costars Emilio Estevez, Ally Sheedy, Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Actor Judd Nelson, asked to assess his career: "I don't feel I've had a career yet. It feels more like a hiccup. Now I've got to figure how to convert this hiccup into a burp."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1999 | GENE SEYMOUR, FOR THE TIMES
From the moment you see stressed-out, short-tempered NYPD patrolman Dante Jackson (Forest Whitaker) roughing up scruffy, gentle Ziggy Malone (Robert Ri'chard) for drawing pictures on a crowded high school stairwell, you suspect that a long day is in store for the borough of Queens. And before you can say "Blackboard Jungle," the following ensues in "Light It Up": A popular teacher (Judd Nelson) is suspended for taking his class off school grounds because there was no available space in the under-heated, overcrowded building for him to do his job. Several students, including the class president (Rosario Dawson)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Actor Judd Nelson, star of "The Breakfast Club" and "St. Elmo's Fire," faces a May 12 court date in Jupiter, Fla., on charges of disorderly intoxication, police say. Nelson, a member of Hollywood's "Brat Pack" of young actors, was rowdy and fought with police late Monday at the Banana Max nightclub, officers said. Nelson was in the Florida town performing at the Burt Reynolds Jupiter Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1986
Pat H. Broeske's attack on Judd Nelson and Ally Sheedy ("Brat Whapping," Outtakes, May 11) once and for all brings definition and clarity to the title "Brat Pack." The young actors to whom this term refers earn higher salaries and notoriety than most staffers on the news-circuit, and therefore are considered fair game for "writers" such as Broeske to scathe, thereby deriving needed therapy for the jealous empty lives they lead. I know Nelson and Sheedy to be very caring and serious about their work; whatever "Blue City" was, or was not, it is unforgivable that a "journalist" chooses to be so unrelentingly destructive.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1999 | GENE SEYMOUR, FOR THE TIMES
From the moment you see stressed-out, short-tempered NYPD patrolman Dante Jackson (Forest Whitaker) roughing up scruffy, gentle Ziggy Malone (Robert Ri'chard) for drawing pictures on a crowded high school stairwell, you suspect that a long day is in store for the borough of Queens. And before you can say "Blackboard Jungle," the following ensues in "Light It Up": A popular teacher (Judd Nelson) is suspended for taking his class off school grounds because there was no available space in the under-heated, overcrowded building for him to do his job. Several students, including the class president (Rosario Dawson)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1987 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Sometimes the movie ads say it all. Take "From the Hip" (citywide), whose ads show Judd Nelson with a bone in his mouth, below the line: "Getting to the top means working like a dog." Forget about how hard Nelson works playing hot-shot lawyer Robin (Stormy) Weathers. It's the movie that's a dog. In fact, it's such an embarrassingly lame comedy that you could easily imagine some mischievous attorney filing suit--for defamation of the entire profession.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1988
Golly, can you imagine how quick the World Series would have been over if the Oakland Athletics had played a good team, as they'd hoped? PATTI GARRITY Manhattan Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1996
Could you guys please write something to piss Sean Penn off? Sunday letters have really gotten boring lately. They were much more entertaining when an outraged Penn was a regular contributor. LOU DeCOSTA Sherman Oaks In 1986, actor-director Penn wrote to defend fellow "Brat Packers" Judd Nelson and Ally Sheedy, and again to propose (facetiously) that Calendar's writers should appear as actors in The Times' spots in movie theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1988
Golly, can you imagine how quick the World Series would have been over if the Oakland Athletics had played a good team, as they'd hoped? PATTI GARRITY Manhattan Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Actor Judd Nelson, star of "The Breakfast Club" and "St. Elmo's Fire," faces a May 12 court date in Jupiter, Fla., on charges of disorderly intoxication, police say. Nelson, a member of Hollywood's "Brat Pack" of young actors, was rowdy and fought with police late Monday at the Banana Max nightclub, officers said. Nelson was in the Florida town performing at the Burt Reynolds Jupiter Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Actor Judd Nelson, asked to assess his career: "I don't feel I've had a career yet. It feels more like a hiccup. Now I've got to figure how to convert this hiccup into a burp."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1987 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Sometimes the movie ads say it all. Take "From the Hip" (citywide), whose ads show Judd Nelson with a bone in his mouth, below the line: "Getting to the top means working like a dog." Forget about how hard Nelson works playing hot-shot lawyer Robin (Stormy) Weathers. It's the movie that's a dog. In fact, it's such an embarrassingly lame comedy that you could easily imagine some mischievous attorney filing suit--for defamation of the entire profession.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1986
Pat H. Broeske's attack on Judd Nelson and Ally Sheedy ("Brat Whapping," Outtakes, May 11) once and for all brings definition and clarity to the title "Brat Pack." The young actors to whom this term refers earn higher salaries and notoriety than most staffers on the news-circuit, and therefore are considered fair game for "writers" such as Broeske to scathe, thereby deriving needed therapy for the jealous empty lives they lead. I know Nelson and Sheedy to be very caring and serious about their work; whatever "Blue City" was, or was not, it is unforgivable that a "journalist" chooses to be so unrelentingly destructive.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Judd Nelson has agreed to star in an NBC-TV miniseries next season, "The Billionaire Boys Club," his agent said. Nelson will play Joe Hunt, the convicted killer who led the group of wealthy young Southern Californians who had dreams of making millions by pooling their investments. Hunt was sentenced last week to life without parole for killing Ronald Levin, who had tricked him into thinking that Levin had parlayed a $5-million investment into $13 million.
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