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Jude Eberhard

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1991 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is the arts editor at the San Diego Edition of The Times
Aida Mancillas was scared. She'd come to Dairy Mart Road, at the U.S. border, as part of a counter-protest against a campaign by conservative San Diegans angry at the rapid flow of illegal immigrants coming from Mexico. As she joined the line that night little more than a year ago, she held up a mirror and turned back the beams from hundreds of burning headlights toward the anonymous cars.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1991 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is the arts editor at the San Diego Edition of The Times
Aida Mancillas was scared. She'd come to Dairy Mart Road, at the U.S. border, as part of a counter-protest against a campaign by conservative San Diegans angry at the rapid flow of illegal immigrants coming from Mexico. As she joined the line that night little more than a year ago, she held up a mirror and turned back the beams from hundreds of burning headlights toward the anonymous cars.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1990
The Centro Cultural Tijuana is hosting its sixth Festival Internacional de la Raza May 5-7, focusing on women in the arts. The festival starts with a ceremonial inauguration Saturday at noon. Three art exhibitions are being mounted, including shows of monotypes and photographs, and a solo show by Reni Templeton. Saturday at 1:30 p.m. there will be a forum on "Las Mujeres de la Raza," and at 6 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1990 | KEVIN BRASS
Picking the Academy Award winners has more to do with examining the collective psyche of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences than choosing the best performances. Several local authorities, each with knowledge of the industry, were asked to play psychologist and attempt to predict how the academy will vote. Their picks rarely reflect their choices as the best in the category, nor whom they would like to see win the Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Love Always" is no more than a minor accomplishment, but it does build to an unexpected and rewarding conclusion and serves as an effective showcase for vibrant and attractive Marisa Ryan. Ryan manages to be engaging even as the film wavers under first-time director Jude Pauline Eberhard. There was probably a better picture to be made from "Finding Signs," a novel written by Sharlene Baker, who adapted it to the screen with Eberhard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1987 | MARCOS BRETON, Times Staff Writer
Most Golden Hill residents at 28th and B streets were excited when a 50-person film crew rolled into their neighborhood Wednesday morning, on location for a feature film slated for a summer release. Terence Frye, 12, was not among them. On most days Frye and his friends ride their bikes to Wicks store, on the corner where filming was taking place, to buy candy. But Wednesday the candy outlet had been transformed into a 1930s grocery store for the filming of "Break of Dawn."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Sometimes a story is so significant that it's worth trying to overlook the flaws in the way in which it is told. This is the case with "Break of Dawn" (selected theaters), which has the awkwardness typical of some low-budget productions of a first-time feature director.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1988 | JACK MATHEWS, San Diego County Arts Editor
Producer Jude Pauline Eberhard's and writer-director Isaac Artenstein's "Break of Dawn" is a movie for people whose intellect is equipped with cruise control. You have to be alert for five or 10 minutes to get a fix on its intentions, then you just sit back and watch the road. Nothing more is required of its audience, least of all a conscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1992 | KEVIN BRASS
Jude Eberhard gets on a roll when she starts talking about her dreams and aspirations for Cafe Cinema, the combination nouveau coffee shop and film room she opened recently with her husband, fellow filmmaker Isaac Artenstein. "There are many different arts communities within the community," she said, picking up speed, "but the film community doesn't have a support system within this community."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1992 | KEVIN BRASS
As his vision for an outdoor cafe began to take shape, moving from a 6-year-old dream into reality, Doug Yeagley had to decide how he could give the space an artistic form. "I didn't want a musical, guitar-strumming coffee house scene," Yeagley said. Instead, Yeagley decided to turn the space behind Tops, his Mission Hills hair salon, into Garden Cinema, a cafe-style haven for film buffs.
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