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Jude Law

ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2009 | Scott Timberg
He's probably the most adapted literary character in history -- and perhaps the only nonexistent person with an honorary degree from the Royal Society of Chemistry. Upward of 70 actors have portrayed him in more than 200 films, since the early days of silent movies. But there's not been a major cinematic adaptation of Sherlock Holmes in decades.
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HEALTH
September 19, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The hit movie "Contagion" depicts a nightmare scenario: a bat virus jumps to pigs and then to humans, infecting them with abandon since they have no immunity to the novel bug. The virus circles the globe in a matter of days, causing coughs, fevers and seizures as scientists from the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention scramble to identify the pathogen and develop a vaccine. Before they do, millions are infected and about a quarter of them die. Those who are not sickened hunker down at home or panic in the streets, scrounging for food and supplies until the outbreak can be contained.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Wes Anderson sweats the details. All of them, all the time, to an extent that can be maddening. But not in "The Grand Budapest Hotel," where the writer-director's familiar style blends with a group of unexpected factors to create a magnificently cockeyed entertainment. With credits including "Moonrise Kingdom," "The Darjeeling Limited" and the stop-motion animation "Fantastic Mr. Fox," Anderson works so assiduously to create obsessively detailed on-screen worlds that the effect has sometimes been hermetic, even stifling.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Times Staff Writers
The 2014 winter-spring movie preview is a broad overview of films opening through late April. Release dates and other details, as compiled by Oliver Gettell, are subject to change. FOR THE RECORD: Movie previews: A listing in the Jan. 12 Sunday Calendar Movie Sneaks section for the film "G.B.F. " had the names of the writer and director reversed. The writer of the teen comedy opening this weekend is George Northy, and the director is Darren Stein. - Jan. 17 Back in the Day An aspiring actor best known for his insurance commercials heads home to Indiana for his high school reunion and reconnects with his now-married friends and an old flame.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Founder and chief executive of Hudson Jeans, one of the nation's hottest premium denim brands. Hudson is best known for its Union Jack logo, hefty sticker price and advertising campaign that features Mick Jagger's daughter. With jeans sold at select boutiques and high-end stores in countries around the world, the company reportedly had annual sales last year of more than $50 million. The image: Kim's goal is to make Hudson Jeans a sought-after item, and he's won over a number of celebrities, including actress Angelina Jolie, soccer star David Beckham and actor Jude Law. He employs an in-house marketing team and uses a public relations company to create buzz on the Web. Hudson's Facebook page includes images of actress Renee Zellweger "rockin' a pair" of Hudson skinny jeans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
More than just about any other major American filmmaker working today, writer-director Wes Anderson doesn't so much make movies as create worlds. Each of his films takes place in its own strange sovereignty, whether the Texas prep school of "Rushmore," the train running through India in "The Darjeeling Limited" or the island hideaway for a pair of adolescent lovers in "Moonrise Kingdom. " His latest, "The Grand Budapest Hotel," is set in the fictional country of Zubrowka. Though the story skips through multiple time periods, the main action is set in the 1930s against the backdrop of impending war, as a meticulous yet rambunctious concierge known as Monsieur Gustav H. (Ralph Fiennes)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
Thirty-five years after starring in the film version of "Sleuth," Michael Caine is going to star in a remake. But this time around he'll play the role that Laurence Olivier portrayed in the 1972 adaptation of Anthony Shaffer's play about two men involved in a game of wits surrounding an affair the younger one is having with the older man's wife. Jude Law will take the part that Caine essayed initially.
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