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Jude T Wanniski

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NEWS
March 6, 1996 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who nudged Steve Forbes toward the presidency had just ordered himself a vodka martini--straight up, olive--then quickly changed his mind in favor of a Diet Coke. It was only lunchtime, and in less than six hours on this January day, he was scheduled to be on national television for an interview about--what else?--Steve Forbes. Jude T.
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NEWS
March 6, 1996 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who nudged Steve Forbes toward the presidency had just ordered himself a vodka martini--straight up, olive--then quickly changed his mind in favor of a Diet Coke. It was only lunchtime, and in less than six hours on this January day, he was scheduled to be on national television for an interview about--what else?--Steve Forbes. Jude T.
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OPINION
August 25, 1996 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a presidential fellow at the World Policy Institute. He is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition" (Houghton Mifflin)
Whatever happens in November, Bob Dole's 15% tax cut won't work, and economics has nothing to do with it. The Dole tax cut won't flop because of its inherent economic flaws; it will flop because of one man. That man is Alan Greenspan, and although in the excitement of the convention Dole seems to have forgotten, Greenspan's term as chairman of the Federal Reserve doesn't run out until the year 2000. That is plenty of time for Greenspan to kill the Dole plan--and it's a dead cinch he will. Why?
OPINION
June 29, 1986 | David M. O'Brien, David M. O'Brien is associate professor of government at the University of Virginia and author of "Storm Center: The Supreme Court in American Politics" (W.W. Norton, 1986)
Whether the Supreme Court carries the "Reagan Revolution' into the next century turns on the appointment of Antonin Scalia, far more than the elevation of Justice William H. Rehnquist to the chief justiceship. And, given the way the U.S. Supreme Court works, Scalia's personal style and skills will prove as important as his judicial philosophy. For the court to shift direction, in the short run at least, it will fall to Scalia to move Justices Lewis F. Powell Jr. and Byron R.
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