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Judge Alex Kozinski

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2009 | Scott Glover
Alex Kozinski, chief judge of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, has apologized for having maintained an e-mail "gag list" in which he distributed crude jokes and other humorous material, according to an opinion made public Tuesday. Kozinski was admonished earlier this year in a separate case for being "judicially imprudent" and "exhibiting poor judgment" by placing sexually explicit photos and videos on an Internet server that could be accessed by the public. The opinion released Tuesday by the Judicial Council of the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals said the investigation into the gag list was concluded after Kozinski said he had stopped e-mailing the jokes and "apologized for any embarrassment to the federal judiciary."
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NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
Common sense and fairness would seem to dictate that the federal government ought not deport an exonerating witness before the witness has been allowed to testify. But good sense is apparently in short supply, at least that's what the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeal said Friday in a sharply worded ruling. "May the government deport an illegal alien who can provide exculpatory evidence for a criminal defendant before counsel for that defendant has even been appointed? We believe the answer is self-evident, as the government recognized in an earlier case where it moved to vacate a conviction after it deported witnesses whose testimony would have exculpated defendant," Judge Alex Kozinski wrote for the three judge panel.
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OPINION
December 4, 2007
Re "A new No. 1 at the 9th Circuit," Opinion, Nov. 30 It is difficult to understand how Carl Tobias could leave out of his account of the change of chief judge in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals the fact that this is the most reversed court in the land, because so many of those reversals occurred during the tenure of Chief Judge Mary M. Schroeder. Ted Smythe Park City, Utah The writer is a professor of communications emeritus at Cal State Fullerton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2009 | Scott Glover
Alex Kozinski, chief judge of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, has apologized for having maintained an e-mail "gag list" in which he distributed crude jokes and other humorous material, according to an opinion made public Tuesday. Kozinski was admonished earlier this year in a separate case for being "judicially imprudent" and "exhibiting poor judgment" by placing sexually explicit photos and videos on an Internet server that could be accessed by the public. The opinion released Tuesday by the Judicial Council of the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals said the investigation into the gag list was concluded after Kozinski said he had stopped e-mailing the jokes and "apologized for any embarrassment to the federal judiciary."
OPINION
July 6, 2008
Re "Naughty saucy dirty funny," Opinion, June 29 Judge Alex Kozinski should have the freedom to laugh at what amuses him. The problem is something else: What it means for his ability to judge fairly. In several decades of work on civil rights issues, I have often received mail containing images of ape-like black men with their arms around white women. Those who sent them had the freedom to do so, and doubtless some thought they were funny. But if one of them were a chief judge for a federal appellate court, I would have no confidence that the rights of black plaintiffs would be understood or fairly acted on by him. I happen to be a Catholic with three daughters.
OPINION
February 21, 2003
Re "On Jurist's Case Over His Ties to a Killer" (Feb. 16), on the attempt by the California attorney general's office to disqualify federal appeals Judge Alex Kozinski from death penalty cases after his meeting with a death row inmate: Interesting, a controversy that casts one of the nation's most conservative judges as a squishy, "I feel your pain" moderate, right before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's expected departure from the U.S. Supreme Court....
OPINION
July 12, 2008
Re "Free speech, public trust," editorial, July 5 The Times' editorial board, having first carefully hidden its copies of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue under a stack of innocuous papers, climbs on its high horse of prudery to declare that any judge who dares enjoy a bit of risque material is unable to consider an obscenity case. By that logic, anybody who has any involvement whatsoever with a given issue, or even knowledge of it, should be barred from deciding anything remotely related to it. Applying the same standard, I can't wait until the next time a religious establishment case comes before the Supreme Court.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
Common sense and fairness would seem to dictate that the federal government ought not deport an exonerating witness before the witness has been allowed to testify. But good sense is apparently in short supply, at least that's what the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeal said Friday in a sharply worded ruling. "May the government deport an illegal alien who can provide exculpatory evidence for a criminal defendant before counsel for that defendant has even been appointed? We believe the answer is self-evident, as the government recognized in an earlier case where it moved to vacate a conviction after it deported witnesses whose testimony would have exculpated defendant," Judge Alex Kozinski wrote for the three judge panel.
NEWS
October 13, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A man who has spent nearly 20 years on death row in Arizona is entitled to have his sentence reconsidered because the judge who imposed it was addicted to marijuana at the time, a sharply divided federal appeals court ruled Friday. "The experts tell us that we can tolerate a certain number of insignificant parts of arsenic in our drinking water and a certain irreducible number of insect parts in our edible grain supplies," U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Stephen S.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | PAMELA A. MacLEAN, United Press International
Three years after appointment to the nation's largest federal appeals court as a brilliant young conservative, Judge Alex Kozinski is proving to be an enigma to both former critics and supporters. Tagged a Reagan conservative by some and a quixotic libertarian by others, Kozinski has shown an independent streak in defending free speech and criticizing government abuse of power. Friends and foes have described him as brilliant, ambitious and a gifted writer.
OPINION
July 12, 2008
Re "Free speech, public trust," editorial, July 5 The Times' editorial board, having first carefully hidden its copies of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue under a stack of innocuous papers, climbs on its high horse of prudery to declare that any judge who dares enjoy a bit of risque material is unable to consider an obscenity case. By that logic, anybody who has any involvement whatsoever with a given issue, or even knowledge of it, should be barred from deciding anything remotely related to it. Applying the same standard, I can't wait until the next time a religious establishment case comes before the Supreme Court.
OPINION
July 6, 2008
Re "Naughty saucy dirty funny," Opinion, June 29 Judge Alex Kozinski should have the freedom to laugh at what amuses him. The problem is something else: What it means for his ability to judge fairly. In several decades of work on civil rights issues, I have often received mail containing images of ape-like black men with their arms around white women. Those who sent them had the freedom to do so, and doubtless some thought they were funny. But if one of them were a chief judge for a federal appellate court, I would have no confidence that the rights of black plaintiffs would be understood or fairly acted on by him. I happen to be a Catholic with three daughters.
OPINION
December 4, 2007
Re "A new No. 1 at the 9th Circuit," Opinion, Nov. 30 It is difficult to understand how Carl Tobias could leave out of his account of the change of chief judge in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals the fact that this is the most reversed court in the land, because so many of those reversals occurred during the tenure of Chief Judge Mary M. Schroeder. Ted Smythe Park City, Utah The writer is a professor of communications emeritus at Cal State Fullerton.
OPINION
February 21, 2003
Re "On Jurist's Case Over His Ties to a Killer" (Feb. 16), on the attempt by the California attorney general's office to disqualify federal appeals Judge Alex Kozinski from death penalty cases after his meeting with a death row inmate: Interesting, a controversy that casts one of the nation's most conservative judges as a squishy, "I feel your pain" moderate, right before Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's expected departure from the U.S. Supreme Court....
NEWS
October 13, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A man who has spent nearly 20 years on death row in Arizona is entitled to have his sentence reconsidered because the judge who imposed it was addicted to marijuana at the time, a sharply divided federal appeals court ruled Friday. "The experts tell us that we can tolerate a certain number of insignificant parts of arsenic in our drinking water and a certain irreducible number of insect parts in our edible grain supplies," U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Stephen S.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | PAMELA A. MacLEAN, United Press International
Three years after appointment to the nation's largest federal appeals court as a brilliant young conservative, Judge Alex Kozinski is proving to be an enigma to both former critics and supporters. Tagged a Reagan conservative by some and a quixotic libertarian by others, Kozinski has shown an independent streak in defending free speech and criticizing government abuse of power. Friends and foes have described him as brilliant, ambitious and a gifted writer.
OPINION
June 13, 2008
Judge Alex Kozinski's statements about the stash of sexually explicit images he collected and that the public (until this week) could view on his website have been varied, although not necessarily inconsistent: He thought the site was for private storage and offered no public access (although he shared some of the material on the site with friends). People have been sending him this stuff for years (implying that it just accumulates, like junk mail).
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