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Judge Gray

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OPINION
April 19, 1992
The brilliant proposal of Judge Gray to legalize marijuana, cocaine and heroin in order to reduce crime, court loads and costs merits further study. Using his exact same reasons, we should also legalize murder, rape, drunken driving, robbery, burglary, assaults and all other actions which burden the courts and flood the jails. As with drugs, mankind has clearly failed to eliminate them. Think of the benefits! We would no longer need jails, police, many lawyers, and, of course, judges.
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NATIONAL
September 10, 2009 | Kim Murphy
With four gray wolves having been killed in Idaho since Sept. 1, a federal judge has cleared the way for legal hunting of the once-endangered predators to proceed. U.S. District Judge Donald W. Molloy in Montana found that there would be no irreparable harm if the limited hunt in that state and Idaho were allowed to go forward. But the judge also wrote that the Fish and Wildlife Service, in continuing to list Wyoming wolves under the Endangered Species Act while delisting them in the two neighboring states, "has distinguished a natural population of wolves based on a political line, not the best available science."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN
U.S. District Judge William P. Gray, who has presided over Orange County's jail overcrowding issue for more than a decade, was honored Thursday by the Orange County Federal Bar Assn. as he prepares to go into retirement. Gray, 79, who underwent surgery last December for a benign brain tumor, received a series of tributes from lawyers gathered at the Beverly Heritage Hotel. The luncheon also featured several judges--including Gray's own son, Orange County Superior Court Judge James P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2003 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
As crusades go, Judge James P. Gray's fight to legalize drugs has been a long and lonely one. His advocation of treatment instead of jail time for drug offenders has gained some converts, but Gray's views remain largely on the outskirts of acceptability. Some of his closest friends disagree with his opinions, and his most vicious opponents accuse him of being a biased, negative role model.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997 | JEFF KASS
Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray, who has suggested legalizing drugs to end a losing drug war, will take a leave of absence beginning today to consider a run for U.S. Congress. Gray, 52, who has indicated an interest in the 46th Congressional District seat, announced his leave in a letter Tuesday to court employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1992
Regarding Judge Gray's drug law comments: Isn't it interesting that not one of Judge Gray's critics denied his assertion that we are losing the war on drugs? And, wasn't it odd that Judge Gray, among all of those commenting on his remarks, was the only one to offer an alternative? And yes, wasn't it typical for our shoot-from-the-hip sheriff to be critical of a citizen exercising his right to free speech? THOMAS BARNUM Laguna Niguel
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1991
I read with some sadness the article ("Judge Gray to Retire, End O.C. Jail Oversight," April 4) regarding the planned retirement of U.S. District Judge William P. Gray, which focused on his role in protecting the constitutional rights of Orange County inmates since 1978. In addition to his judicial duties, Judge Gray performed another very important service for the community. He hosted groups of students from a number of schools throughout Southern California. For five years, my eighth-grade history/social science classes boarded buses for the long ride from Niguel Hills Junior High in Laguna Niguel to the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He describes himself as a conservative judge in a conservative county. But many of those who have watched the career of Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray said his approach to the job is anything but traditional. Part rebel, part reformer, part conciliator, he has put together a record that keeps him in the limelight. Gray's views make him a frequent target.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He describes himself as a conservative judge in a conservative county. But many of those who have watched the career of Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray said his approach to the job is anything but traditional. His record--part rebel, part reformer, part conciliator--has kept him in the limelight. A decade ago, Gray's call for the legalization of drugs prompted the county sheriff to quip, "What was this guy smoking?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2001 | DANA PARSONS
He's taken on Bob Dornan. He's taken on Brad Gates. When it comes to speaking his mind, Judge Jim Gray usually doesn't cramp up. So it shouldn't have been surprising to read what His Eminence had to say about the Orange County Board of Supervisors and the fumble-fingered way it has handled the El Toro airport issue in recent years. On the other hand, talk about your easy targets. I'm reading a transcript of Gray's words now, and there's not a single "whereas" anywhere in there.
SPORTS
October 7, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Raiders' countersuit against the City of Oakland and Alameda County has been dealt a blow by state Superior Court Judge Joe Gray in Sacramento. The city and county sued the Raiders in 1997, alleging the team tried to block a sponsorship deal to rename Oakland-Alameda County Stadium and also seeking to stop the Raiders' alleged threats to move back to Los Angeles. The Raiders counter-sued earlier this year, seeking to break their long-term lease because games weren't selling out as promised.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997 | JEFF KASS
Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray, who has suggested legalizing drugs to end a losing drug war, will take a leave of absence beginning today to consider a run for U.S. Congress. Gray, 52, who has indicated an interest in the 46th Congressional District seat, announced his leave in a letter Tuesday to court employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1994
Regarding your editorial comments on legalization of drugs ("Legalization, No; Policy Overhaul, Yes" Jan. 4): Your solid stand against drug legalization is remarkable considering the number of commentaries that have appeared in The Times since Judge (James P.) Gray initially proposed legalization several years ago. I had hoped you would have been more convinced by the logical arguments that have been presented in favor of legalization. It is incredible that our society has not learned the lessons of Prohibition and continues to repeat that failure of history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renewing his call for drug policy reform, Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray on Monday picked up the endorsements of local developer Kathryn Thompson and a number of other officials who support his call for a national commission to study drug laws. "Without change, the situation is not going to get better," Los Angeles County Sheriff's Lt. Greg Morgon said at a news conference here. "The important thing is that we take a look at our entire policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1993
Regarding Schuller's statement of reversal on Judge Gray's resolution asking for discussion of our nation's drug policies (the resolution says nothing about decriminalizing drugs): If Christ were alive today and was asked what to do with drug addicts, I think he would respond "help them," not "throw them in prison." After reading about Schuller's apparent reversal, it would seem that he is more interested in being "politically correct" than in being a good Christian. DOUG CAREY Los Angeles
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