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Judge Roy Bean

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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Navy Lt. Pete Pedrozo squealed his jeep to a dusty halt and strode into what serves for a jail these days in this small provincial town. With pistol strapped firmly to his side, the judge had come. The man behind bars had reportedly stabbed his wife in a drunken rage. But the acting local magistrate, a middle-age elementary-school teacher, had refused to rule on the case for fear that any decision might invite bloody retribution.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
Long before he became a 19th century folk hero as Texas' "Law West of the Pecos," Judge Roy Bean--gambler, con man, boozer and bigot--reshaped a bit of Los Angeles' history in his own irascible image. Books, magazine articles and movies starring Walter Brennan and Paul Newman have recounted the escapades of the crusty old judge and the whiskey-flavored justice he dispensed from the porch of his saloon, the Jersey Lily.
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NEWS
July 6, 1986 | MIKE COCHRAN, Associated Press
He was tough and crude, a gambler and a con man, a boozer and a bigot and an opportunist who played fast and loose with the law of the land. He was mean and uncouth and possessed the table manners of a barbarian. He probably would have been a womanizer except that he was fat and hairy, seldom bathed and suffered a schoolboy crush on a British actress he never met.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | JON NALICK
Paul Newman has played some odd characters in his long career, but perhaps none so wildly offbeat as the title character in "The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean." Bean, an outlaw who appoints himself judge in one of the Old West's most dangerous territories, is a comic and tragic hero who promises to bring peace to the area, no matter whom he has to kill to do it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1985
None of us has any doubts that driving while under the influence of alcohol is a shamefully irresponsible act; causing the death of an innocent human being multiplies that act tenfold. But reading the account (May 30) of Evan Haller's sentencing hearing in a Van Nuys court was deeply disturbing, particularly Judge Albracht's remarks delivered from the bench that "an offense like this cries out for the vengeance." Forgive me if I am wrong, but I was under the impression that sentencing under our judicial system was not for the sake of avenging a criminal act but instead to impose punishment to fit the crime and, hopefully, rehabilitation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
Long before he became a 19th century folk hero as Texas' "Law West of the Pecos," Judge Roy Bean--gambler, con man, boozer and bigot--reshaped a bit of Los Angeles' history in his own irascible image. Books, magazine articles and movies starring Walter Brennan and Paul Newman have recounted the escapades of the crusty old judge and the whiskey-flavored justice he dispensed from the porch of his saloon, the Jersey Lily.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | Kevin Thomas, The week's recommended films, with minireviews from Times Critics
KCOP, Friday at 8 p.m. John Huston and John Milius joined forces as director and writer, respectively, of this whimsical, highly sophisticated mock-heroic Western starring Paul Newman in the title role as the tough hoobre who brought law and order to the Texas Badlands and became part of the folklore of the Old West.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | JON NALICK
Paul Newman has played some odd characters in his long career, but perhaps none so wildly offbeat as the title character in "The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean." Bean, an outlaw who appoints himself judge in one of the Old West's most dangerous territories, is a comic and tragic hero who promises to bring peace to the area, no matter whom he has to kill to do it.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | Kevin Thomas, The week's recommended films, with minireviews from Times Critics
KCOP, Friday at 8 p.m. John Huston and John Milius joined forces as director and writer, respectively, of this whimsical, highly sophisticated mock-heroic Western starring Paul Newman in the title role as the tough hoobre who brought law and order to the Texas Badlands and became part of the folklore of the Old West.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Navy Lt. Pete Pedrozo squealed his jeep to a dusty halt and strode into what serves for a jail these days in this small provincial town. With pistol strapped firmly to his side, the judge had come. The man behind bars had reportedly stabbed his wife in a drunken rage. But the acting local magistrate, a middle-age elementary-school teacher, had refused to rule on the case for fear that any decision might invite bloody retribution.
NEWS
July 6, 1986 | MIKE COCHRAN, Associated Press
He was tough and crude, a gambler and a con man, a boozer and a bigot and an opportunist who played fast and loose with the law of the land. He was mean and uncouth and possessed the table manners of a barbarian. He probably would have been a womanizer except that he was fat and hairy, seldom bathed and suffered a schoolboy crush on a British actress he never met.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1985
None of us has any doubts that driving while under the influence of alcohol is a shamefully irresponsible act; causing the death of an innocent human being multiplies that act tenfold. But reading the account (May 30) of Evan Haller's sentencing hearing in a Van Nuys court was deeply disturbing, particularly Judge Albracht's remarks delivered from the bench that "an offense like this cries out for the vengeance." Forgive me if I am wrong, but I was under the impression that sentencing under our judicial system was not for the sake of avenging a criminal act but instead to impose punishment to fit the crime and, hopefully, rehabilitation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1996 | SCOTT STEEPLETON
A 23-year-old Simi Valley man was arrested on suspicion of felony drunk driving after he ran his car into the back of a bar Sunday morning in Simi Valley, authorities said. The 2 a.m. accident at 2780 Tapo Canyon Road caused major damage to the car and sent one person to the hospital with head and facial injuries, said Simi Valley Police Sgt. John McGinty. McGinty said a car driven by Luis Orozco hit the back of Judge Roy Bean's bar.
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