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NEWS
April 18, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a high-profile case of a retired Navy officer convicted of killing the neighborhood bully, a judge reduced the conviction Thursday from murder to manslaughter and gave the killer a lighter sentence than prosecutors and the victim's family had sought. Superior Court Judge William Mudd said the victim, John Harper Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- A federal judge Thursday called California's use of large amounts of pepper spray to subdue mentally ill prisoners a "horrific" violation of constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment. U.S. District Judge Lawrence Karlton's order requires California to continue revising policies that govern how mentally ill inmates in the state's prisons are disciplined, including the use of solitary confinement. He found that such isoaltion of mentally ill inmates "can and does cause serious psychological harm" and must be limited.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2000
Shawn Hubler's statement in her Feb. 17 column that only 7% of the judges appointed by Govs. George Deukmejian and Pete Wilson had experience as public defenders is quite misleading, as it gives the impression that the other 93% had prosecutorial backgrounds. The judges who make up the Los Angeles Superior Court come from a wide variety of legal disciplines, such as civil, family law, private defense practices and corporate staff attorneys, as well as from U.S. district and city attorneys' offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- A retired appellate judge in Los Angeles has been tapped by federal courts to make the final decision on which and how many inmates to release from prison if California fails to meet a court-ordered limit on the state prison population. In naming Elwood Lui the compliance officer in the prison crowding case, federal judges also put much of his work out of public view, declaring that his communications with the courts are "confidential and privileged. " Lui did not immediately return calls to his office for comment.
SPORTS
June 13, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
The World Boxing Organization on Wednesday announced it has assigned five judges to re-score Manny Pacquiao's controversial loss by decision to Palm Springs' Timothy Bradley in an effort to convince state commissions to widen the pool of judges for major fights. Although many at ringside for Saturday's fight gave Pacquiao between nine and 11 rounds, judges Duane Ford and C.J. Ross scored the bout 115-113 (seven rounds to five) in Bradley's favor, and a third Nevada judge, Jerry Roth, had it 115-113 for Pacquiao in the WBO welterweight title contest.
OPINION
June 2, 2010 | Tim Rutten
These days our civic conversation is dominated by declarations rather than argument, by assertion as opposed to evidence. It is, for example, routinely asserted in some quarters that religion and its values are everywhere under siege and that believers are continually discriminated against in public life. In fact, we are, as a people, more God-besotted than at any time in our recent history. America is the only country in the developed world in which a large majority continues to profess belief in a supreme being; slightly more than half our people are formally affiliated with a church, which also is anomalous among advanced nations.
OPINION
April 8, 2009 | David B. Rivkin Jr., David B. Rivkin Jr. is a partner at Baker & Hostetler and served in the Justice Department and the White House counsel's office in the administrations of Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush.
When Brent Benjamin ran for chief justice of the West Virginia Supreme Court in 2004, the nation's fourth-largest coal company donated $3 million to his successful campaign -- more than all his other contributors combined. Two years later, the company, Massey Energy, came before Benjamin's court to appeal a $50-million judgment it had been ordered to pay. Benjamin cast the deciding vote in a 3-2 decision to overturn the award. Now the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- A retired appellate judge in Los Angeles has been tapped by federal courts to make the final decision on which and how many inmates to release from prison if California fails to meet a court-ordered limit on the state prison population. In naming Elwood Lui the compliance officer in the prison crowding case, federal judges also put much of his work out of public view, declaring that his communications with the courts are "confidential and privileged. " Lui did not immediately return calls to his office for comment.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Supporters of photo ID requirements for voters are fond of noting that the Supreme Court upheld Indiana's ID law in a 2007 decision written by the then-dean of the court's liberal wing, Justice John Paul Stevens. Now critics of voter ID laws, who portray them as an attempt to suppress the votes of racial minorities and other Democratic-leaning groups, have a comeback. In a new book, the famously prolific Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago writes that “I plead guilty to having written the majority opinion (affirmed by the Supreme Court)
OPINION
December 21, 2011
Judging the judges Re "Gingrich might scrap certain judges, courts," Dec. 18 Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich will surely put our country on a slippery slope, should he get elected president and carry out his threat to scrap certain federal judges and courts. The Supreme Court is supreme because we the people allow it to be; we recognize the need for a final arbiter. Should we allow someone, anyone, to circumvent the law, we will cease being a democracy. Very few Supreme Court decisions are unanimous, thereby telling us that even among carefully vetted jurists there is disagreement.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Charis E. Kubrin and Erik Nielson
For 16 months, Bay Area rapper Deandre Mitchell - better known as Laz Tha Boy - has been sitting in a jail cell faced with a decision no artist should have to make: whether to defend his innocence at trial, knowing his music likely will be used as evidence against him, or take a plea bargain and admit to crimes he maintains he did not commit. Mitchell's case dates to October 2012, when he was indicted for his alleged role in two gang-related shootings that occurred that year. Prosecutors didn't present a single arrest or conviction to establish Mitchell's association with a criminal gang, and with conflicting eyewitness testimony - and no physical evidence connecting him to the shootings, according to defense attorney John Hamasaki - prosecutors elected to introduce something else: Mitchell's violent gangsta rap videos and lyrics, which were presented to the grand jury as evidence of his criminal behavior.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: Our manager refuses owner requests for documents, causing our association to be sued several times a year. Each time she comes to court as a defendant, she brings her so-called evidence and answers, "Your honor, see Exhibit X. " She overloads on exhibits, most of which are contrived for the purpose of that hearing. Her main strategy includes putting on big exhibit head notes supposedly explaining what each exhibit consists of, but when the exhibits are scrutinized and read, they have little or nothing to do with what is head-noted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | Laura J. Nelson
Knocking down one of the last hurdles for Los Angeles' long-awaited Westside subway extension, a judge ruled late Wednesday that transit officials followed environmental laws when they chose a route that would require tunneling under Beverly Hills High School. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority's five-year, $13.8-million environmental review process was thorough and fair, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge John A. Torribio wrote in a 15-page decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
The union that represents Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies has gone from two presidents to none. A judge has stepped into the battle for control of the Assn. for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, ruling that it will have no leader until a court hearing April 17. Instead, decisions will be made by a three-person committee, including one member from each of the union's competing factions and a longtime staffer considered relatively neutral. Last month, newly elected president Armando Macias was ousted and a different president installed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
Andre Birotte Jr., the chief federal prosecutor in Los Angeles, has been nominated by President Obama to serve as a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, the White House announced Thursday. Birotte, who has served as the U.S. attorney overseeing the nation's second-largest office since 2010, is a former Los Angeles County deputy public defender who also acted as the Los Angeles Police Department's inspector general for six years. As L.A.'s top federal prosecutor, he reinstated a public corruption and civil rights unit disbanded by his predecessor and oversaw high-profile investigations into the L.A. County jails and into state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon.
SPORTS
April 1, 2014
Bill Plaschke, a staple of The Times Sports section since joining the paper in 1987, has taken first place in the Associated Press Sports Editors annual contest for column writing among papers with circulations of more than 175,000. Plaschke, a columnist since 1996, has now won the prestigious national columnist award five times and has been a frequent top-10 finisher in multiple writing categories. The contest honors the best work in sports journalism both in print and on the web. The final column-writing results were announced Tuesday.
OPINION
April 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Should California judges be able to ask lawyers for help in lobbying Sacramento against cuts to the courts' budgets? Many judges and lawyers just assumed the answer was yes. Why wouldn't they be able to? Nobody is better acquainted with the trouble caused by court budget cuts than judges, who see firsthand the result of closing courthouses and restricting hours of access. But lawyers, especially litigators who do so much of their work in the courtroom, run a close second. Why shouldn't judges be able to ask influential attorneys at big firms (the same people who dole out a lot of political donations to political candidates)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge Friday ruled that a front-runner in the race for county assessor can't call himself a "deputy assessor" on the ballot. Candidate Omar Haroon, an appraiser in the assessor's office, had filed a court case contending that the occupation listed by rival candidate Jeffrey Prang, a West Hollywood councilman who also works as a public affairs manager for the county agency, was misleading. The assessor's office does not use "deputy assessor" as an official job title.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Jack Dolan
A Los Angeles judge signaled Tuesday that he intends to order Department of Water and Power union chief Brian D'Arcy to turn over financial information showing how two nonprofit trusts he co-directs used $40 million in ratepayer money. D'Arcy, who oversees the nonprofits with the utility's general manager, has been fighting city officials' efforts to account for the money since September, after The Times reported that DWP managers had only scant information about how the money has been spent.
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