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NEWS
April 18, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a high-profile case of a retired Navy officer convicted of killing the neighborhood bully, a judge reduced the conviction Thursday from murder to manslaughter and gave the killer a lighter sentence than prosecutors and the victim's family had sought. Superior Court Judge William Mudd said the victim, John Harper Jr.
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NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
In the ongoing battle over offshore drilling, a federal judge in Alaska told regulators Thursday to redo an environmental impact study that underestimated the amount of recoverable oil and, potentially, the risks to delicate Arctic habitat. The decision by U.S. District Judge Ralph Beistline stopped short of scrapping the $2.6 billion in leases, however. His ruling followed an appeals court decision in January that federal officials had arbitrarily decided drilling companies could extract 1 billion barrels of oil from the shallow waters off the northwest coast of Alaska.
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NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Rene Lynch
"MasterChef" crowned Luca Manfe its Season 4 winner, proof that nice guys don't always finish last. Or maybe it was proof that the world will conspire to make sure mean girls don't finish first. It was East Coast versus West Coast as Luca, the restaurant manager from New York City, took on Natasha Crnjac, the homemaker from San Diego. But this being reality TV and all, the face-off was about so much more. It was TV nice guy versus TV villainess. The cameras played up Luca and his happy-go-lucky style, along with his endearing fresh-off-the-boat-from-Italy accent, while also homing in on Natasha's penchant for talking smack about her competitors while rarely missing an opportunity to talk about her own talents (or her own pretty looks)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
The Los Angeles Unified School District does not need to release the names of teachers in connection with their performance ratings, according to a tentative court ruling issued Thursday. A three-judge state appellate court panel tentatively found a stronger public interest in keeping the names confidential than publicly releasing them. Disclosure would not serve the public interest in monitoring the district's performance as much as it would affect the recruitment and retention of good instructors and other issues, the ruling said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2000
Shawn Hubler's statement in her Feb. 17 column that only 7% of the judges appointed by Govs. George Deukmejian and Pete Wilson had experience as public defenders is quite misleading, as it gives the impression that the other 93% had prosecutorial backgrounds. The judges who make up the Los Angeles Superior Court come from a wide variety of legal disciplines, such as civil, family law, private defense practices and corporate staff attorneys, as well as from U.S. district and city attorneys' offices.
OPINION
June 2, 2010 | Tim Rutten
These days our civic conversation is dominated by declarations rather than argument, by assertion as opposed to evidence. It is, for example, routinely asserted in some quarters that religion and its values are everywhere under siege and that believers are continually discriminated against in public life. In fact, we are, as a people, more God-besotted than at any time in our recent history. America is the only country in the developed world in which a large majority continues to profess belief in a supreme being; slightly more than half our people are formally affiliated with a church, which also is anomalous among advanced nations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- A retired appellate judge in Los Angeles has been tapped by federal courts to make the final decision on which and how many inmates to release from prison if California fails to meet a court-ordered limit on the state prison population. In naming Elwood Lui the compliance officer in the prison crowding case, federal judges also put much of his work out of public view, declaring that his communications with the courts are "confidential and privileged. " Lui did not immediately return calls to his office for comment.
OPINION
April 8, 2009 | David B. Rivkin Jr., David B. Rivkin Jr. is a partner at Baker & Hostetler and served in the Justice Department and the White House counsel's office in the administrations of Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush.
When Brent Benjamin ran for chief justice of the West Virginia Supreme Court in 2004, the nation's fourth-largest coal company donated $3 million to his successful campaign -- more than all his other contributors combined. Two years later, the company, Massey Energy, came before Benjamin's court to appeal a $50-million judgment it had been ordered to pay. Benjamin cast the deciding vote in a 3-2 decision to overturn the award. Now the U.S.
OPINION
December 21, 2011
Judging the judges Re "Gingrich might scrap certain judges, courts," Dec. 18 Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich will surely put our country on a slippery slope, should he get elected president and carry out his threat to scrap certain federal judges and courts. The Supreme Court is supreme because we the people allow it to be; we recognize the need for a final arbiter. Should we allow someone, anyone, to circumvent the law, we will cease being a democracy. Very few Supreme Court decisions are unanimous, thereby telling us that even among carefully vetted jurists there is disagreement.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Supporters of photo ID requirements for voters are fond of noting that the Supreme Court upheld Indiana's ID law in a 2007 decision written by the then-dean of the court's liberal wing, Justice John Paul Stevens. Now critics of voter ID laws, who portray them as an attempt to suppress the votes of racial minorities and other Democratic-leaning groups, have a comeback. In a new book, the famously prolific Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago writes that “I plead guilty to having written the majority opinion (affirmed by the Supreme Court)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday appointed as head of California's political ethics agency a judge who has overseen the discipline of attorneys. Jodi Remke, presiding judge of the State Bar Court of California, is Brown's choice for chairwoman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission. Her appointment fills a void created six months ago when Chairwoman Ann Ravel moved to the Federal Elections Commission. Good-government activists including Robert Stern, a former general counsel for the California agency and a coauthor of the state Political Reform Act, said they knew nothing about Remke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- With ethics scandals rocking the Capitol, Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday appointed as the new head of California's ethics watchdog agency a judge who has overseen the discipline of attorneys. Joann M. “Jodi” Remke, who is presiding judge of the State Bar Court, is Brown's choice to serve as chairwoman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission. The appointment fills a void created six months ago when Chairwoman Ann Ravel was appointed to the Federal Election Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant
A lawsuit alleging that a former employee in L.A. City Councilman Mitchell Englander's office was sexually harassed by the lawmaker's top deputy can move forward, although the plaintiff may be required to identify herself, a Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday. During a hearing, city attorneys asked Superior Court Judge Maureen Duffy-Lewis to dismiss the lawsuit filed last fall, arguing that the allegations did not qualify as harassment under the state's fair employment laws.
OPINION
April 22, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Comprehensive immigration reform is probably dead for yet another year, the victim - once again - of a dysfunctional Congress that can't even reach agreement on the things it agrees on. There is nothing President Obama can do about that, although if therapy were available for political relationships, there'd be a referral waiting to be made. In the meantime, the president still has to administer immigration laws as they exist, and he reportedly is considering dropping his opposition to bond hearings for detained undocumented immigrants.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
North Dakota's law banning abortions after 6 weeks of pregnancy is unconstitutional, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, striking down what critics had called the nation's most extreme limit on the procedure. The law, which was approved last year but never took effect, made it a crime for a woman to abort a fetus with a detectable heartbeat. Offending doctors faced up to five years in prison. An exception was allowed for medical emergencies. U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland said the law was “in direct contradiction” of the Supreme Court's 40-year-old decision in Roe vs. Wade, which established “viability” as the critical point at which states could begin restricting abortions.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A federal judge in Boston ruled Wednesday that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev may view autopsy photographs of three people who died in the Boston Marathon bombings and indicated that he might ease some of the restrictions on the defendant to allow him unmonitored visits with his family. Tsarnaev, 20, has been held in federal custody since his arrest last year in the April 15 explosions at the finish line area of the marathon. He faces the death penalty if convicted of 30 counts, including detonating a weapon of mass destruction resulting in deaths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013 | By Paige St. John
A panel of federal judges on Thursday ordered Gov. Jerry Brown to immediately begin releasing inmates from the state's crowded prisons. In a 52-page order signed by U.S. District Judges Stephen Reinhardt, Lawrence Karlton and Thelton Henderson, the court ordered Brown to expand good-time credits that allow inmates to finish their prison terms early. The judges demanded that the state take such steps "commencing forthwith" and regardless of any laws that might prevent those releases.
OPINION
April 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The first open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act ended this week with roughly 7.5 million people obtaining policies through the new state insurance exchanges, including more than 1.3 million at Covered California. That's an amazing and welcome result, considering how badly many of the exchanges stumbled when sign-ups began in October. Nevertheless, it's far too early to judge the success or failure of the healthcare law, given that key tests of the program's sustainability have yet to be passed.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By Brian Bennett and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Obama administration officials are considering allowing bond hearings for immigrants in prolonged detention, officials said, a shift that could slow the pace of deportations because immigration courts expedite cases of incarcerated immigrants. Several thousand immigrants could be released from jails across the country if judges are allowed to hear their cases and grant bond, advocates say. The proposal is one of several being floated as the White House scrambles to ease the concerns of Latino groups and other traditional allies that have turned on President Obama in recent weeks.
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