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January 11, 1996 | EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Moore is a West Point graduate, a Vietnam War veteran, the only Republican circuit court judge in Etowah County--and a Christian. For almost a year, he has been embroiled in a lawsuit pitting him and his supporters--those who view America as a Christian nation--against the ACLU and the plaintiffs they represent, who want Moore to leave his Christian beliefs outside the courthouse door. It all started when Moore, 47, brought his handcrafted plaque of the Ten Commandments into the courtroom.
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NEWS
March 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Thursday struck down a school prayer law in Alabama, a Bible Belt state where politicians encourage religious expression in classrooms and courtrooms. Michael Chandler, an assistant principal at Valley Head Middle School, fought the 1993 measure requiring all school-related events to permit "non-sectarian, non-proselytizing student-initiated, voluntary prayer."
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NEWS
January 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
A man accused of mail bombings that killed a federal judge and a city councilman in two states pleaded innocent Friday. Walter Leroy Moody Jr., 56, was arraigned a second time before a federal magistrate in Atlanta on charges of sending the 1989 mail bombs that killed U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Robert Vance in Alabama and Savannah civil rights lawyer and alderman Robert Robinson. Moody was first arraigned on the charges Nov. 8, the day after his arrest.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roy Moore is a West Point graduate, a Vietnam War veteran, the only Republican circuit court judge in Etowah County--and a Christian. For almost a year, he has been embroiled in a lawsuit pitting him and his supporters--those who view America as a Christian nation--against the ACLU and the plaintiffs they represent, who want Moore to leave his Christian beliefs outside the courthouse door. It all started when Moore, 47, brought his handcrafted plaque of the Ten Commandments into the courtroom.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
A man charged in mail bombings that killed a federal judge and a lawyer refused Thursday to enter a plea, pending his attempt to bar any federal judge from hearing the case. In a hearing before a federal magistrate, lawyers for Walter Leroy Moody Jr. said the fact that a federal judge was one of the victims damages the impartiality of all federal judges. Moody's attorneys requested in a court motion that the Senate Judiciary Committee appoint an independent officer to hear the case. U.S.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Georgia man "obsessed" with a legal dispute was indicted Wednesday for the 1989 mail-bomb murders of federal appellate Judge Robert S. Vance and Robert E. Robinson, a Savannah, Ga., NAACP attorney. A federal grand jury in Atlanta also charged Walter Leroy Moody Jr. in a 70-count indictment with sending other mail bombs to the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals and the NAACP office at Jacksonville, Fla.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Thursday struck down a school prayer law in Alabama, a Bible Belt state where politicians encourage religious expression in classrooms and courtrooms. Michael Chandler, an assistant principal at Valley Head Middle School, fought the 1993 measure requiring all school-related events to permit "non-sectarian, non-proselytizing student-initiated, voluntary prayer."
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Two Supreme Court justices - Sonia Sotomayor and Stephen G. Breyer - are upset that the court won't hear the appeal of an Alabama killer who was sentenced to death by a judge after a jury declined to impose the death penalty. They have lots of company. But I'm sympathetic to the justices who declined to take the case. A jury voted 8 to 4 against the death sentence for Mario Dion Woodward, who was convicted of killing a police officer. But under Alabama law, a jury's determination on the question of death is only advisory; a judge can disregard it, and the judge decided that Woodward should be executed.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
Walter L. Nixon whiles away the days in a minimum security jail in New Orleans, the only federal judge in prison and only the second in history to be convicted of a felony while serving on the bench. The Mississippi jurist still draws his $89,500-a-year government salary--totaling more than $300,000 since his 1984 conviction for perjury.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
The Deep South, already the nation's hottest illegal immigration battleground, will see more action in the coming days, with Mississippi considering an Alabama-style immigration crackdown bill and a federal appeals court set to consider Thursday whether the Alabama law, and a similar one in Georgia, are constitutional. The legislation and the courtroom battle will serve as a prelude to April 25, when the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments over Arizona's SB 1070, the controversial 2010 law that triggered a wave of state-level efforts nationwide to get tough on illegal immigrants.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
A man accused of mail bombings that killed a federal judge and a city councilman in two states pleaded innocent Friday. Walter Leroy Moody Jr., 56, was arraigned a second time before a federal magistrate in Atlanta on charges of sending the 1989 mail bombs that killed U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Robert Vance in Alabama and Savannah civil rights lawyer and alderman Robert Robinson. Moody was first arraigned on the charges Nov. 8, the day after his arrest.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
A man charged in mail bombings that killed a federal judge and a lawyer refused Thursday to enter a plea, pending his attempt to bar any federal judge from hearing the case. In a hearing before a federal magistrate, lawyers for Walter Leroy Moody Jr. said the fact that a federal judge was one of the victims damages the impartiality of all federal judges. Moody's attorneys requested in a court motion that the Senate Judiciary Committee appoint an independent officer to hear the case. U.S.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Georgia man "obsessed" with a legal dispute was indicted Wednesday for the 1989 mail-bomb murders of federal appellate Judge Robert S. Vance and Robert E. Robinson, a Savannah, Ga., NAACP attorney. A federal grand jury in Atlanta also charged Walter Leroy Moody Jr. in a 70-count indictment with sending other mail bombs to the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals and the NAACP office at Jacksonville, Fla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ NONA YATES, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Prompted by recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings, judges are more actively weighing science on the scales of justice to decide for themselves whether new research is sound enough to be presented to a jury. From homicide and rape cases to product liability claims and complex antitrust litigation, courtroom proceedings today increasingly hinge on nuances of new technology, science or medicine, according to a recent federal courts study commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2002 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
It's dawn on a fall Saturday and Tim Estes, tired and grumpy, has been at work for two hours. He is putting one of America's longest and least-known winning streaks at risk. The Rain Bird float, Estes' best hope for extending his victory run, will soon travel down a quiet street in Duarte, the critical final inspection before it glides down Colorado Boulevard in the 2003 Rose Parade.
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