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NEWS
September 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Phoenix Superior Court judge who resigned after pleading guilty to conspiracy to possess marijuana was placed on three years' probation, fined $20,000 and ordered to spend 240 hours in community service telling his story to the public. Philip Marquardt, 57, a veteran of 20 years on the Maricopa County court, also was ordered to submit to periodic drug tests. The felony charge was filed against Marquardt after police intercepted a parcel addressed to him that contained 13 grams of marijuana.
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NATIONAL
March 12, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - An Arizona law that put an end to ethnic studies courses in Tucson schools has been largely upheld as constitutional by a federal judge, but supporters of the program say their legal fight to restore the program will continue. U.S. Circuit Court Judge Wallace Tashima on Friday found most of the law that bans public schools from teaching certain race-related courses, such as Mexican American studies, constitutional with one small exception. Tashima ruled that the portion of the law that prohibits courses designed for certain ethnic groups was unconstitutionally vague.
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NEWS
April 9, 1994 | Associated Press
A judge has thrown out five of the six charges against a man accused of conspiring to ship explosives detonators to the Irish Republican Army. U.S. District Judge John Roll dismissed all but one charge against Patrick Moley, 30, at the close of the prosecution's case against him and five other co-defendants Thursday. Roll rejected a defense motion to dismiss charges against the other five defendants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A state judge Wednesday ordered an Arizona nonprofit to hand over a wide range of records involving its $11-million donation to California political campaigns, a victory for the state's campaign finance watchdog. California's Fair Political Practices Commission is trying to unmask the donors behind the Arizona group. The case is being watched as a test of state regulations intended to prevent campaign contributors from anonymously routing money through nonprofits. "This is a moment of truth for our campaign disclosure laws," said Derek Cressman of Common Cause, an activist group that filed a complaint against the Arizona organization.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | LAURA LAUGHLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Superior Court Judge Philip Marquardt, a 20-year veteran of the bench, resigned Thursday after pleading guilty to conspiracy to possess marijuana, a felony, and admitting he was addicted to the drug. The Maricopa County judge, 56, who was retained by voters in 1988 despite a misdemeanor marijuana conviction that year, faces up to 22 months in prison. "I have a serious problem, an addiction to marijuana," Marquardt told a press conference.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - An Arizona law that put an end to ethnic studies courses in Tucson schools has been largely upheld as constitutional by a federal judge, but supporters of the program say their legal fight to restore the program will continue. U.S. Circuit Court Judge Wallace Tashima on Friday found most of the law that bans public schools from teaching certain race-related courses, such as Mexican American studies, constitutional with one small exception. Tashima ruled that the portion of the law that prohibits courses designed for certain ethnic groups was unconstitutionally vague.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A state judge Wednesday ordered an Arizona nonprofit to hand over a wide range of records involving its $11-million donation to California political campaigns, a victory for the state's campaign finance watchdog. California's Fair Political Practices Commission is trying to unmask the donors behind the Arizona group. The case is being watched as a test of state regulations intended to prevent campaign contributors from anonymously routing money through nonprofits. "This is a moment of truth for our campaign disclosure laws," said Derek Cressman of Common Cause, an activist group that filed a complaint against the Arizona organization.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
The federal judge who halted most of a controversial Arizona immigration law dismissed a separate lawsuit Tuesday that had been filed by a Tucson police officer. The complaint by Martin Escobar was one of seven lawsuits filed in an attempt to nullify SB1070, which requires police officers to determine the status of people they have legally detained whom they suspect of being in the country illegally. U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton, ruling in a lawsuit brought by the Obama administration in late July, found that the key provisions of the law appear to violate the U.S. Constitution.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening a potentially controversial era in American politics, a federal judge Tuesday gave the Arizona Democratic Party the green light to hold the nation's first binding election that will accept ballots from the Internet. After nearly 10 hours of testimony, U.S. District Judge Paul G. Rosenblatt ruled that the Voting Integrity Project of Arlington, Va.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2004 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge on Wednesday cleared the way for a controversial Arizona law that denies some public services to illegal immigrants. U.S. District Judge David C. Bury lifted an order that had blocked Proposition 200, which voters overwhelmingly passed last month. Shortly afterward, Gov. Janet Napolitano issued an executive order directing all state agencies to immediately implement the terms of the proposition.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
The federal judge who halted most of a controversial Arizona immigration law dismissed a separate lawsuit Tuesday that had been filed by a Tucson police officer. The complaint by Martin Escobar was one of seven lawsuits filed in an attempt to nullify SB1070, which requires police officers to determine the status of people they have legally detained whom they suspect of being in the country illegally. U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton, ruling in a lawsuit brought by the Obama administration in late July, found that the key provisions of the law appear to violate the U.S. Constitution.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2008 | Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Thursday upheld a controversial new Arizona law that mandates the closure of businesses that knowingly hire illegal immigrants. U.S. District Judge Neil Wake rejected the arguments of business and immigrant-rights groups, which sued saying the law was an unconstitutional usurping of the federal government's right to regulate immigration. "The act does not make employers conform to a stricter form of conduct than federal law," Wake wrote in his 37-page decision.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2004 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge on Wednesday cleared the way for a controversial Arizona law that denies some public services to illegal immigrants. U.S. District Judge David C. Bury lifted an order that had blocked Proposition 200, which voters overwhelmingly passed last month. Shortly afterward, Gov. Janet Napolitano issued an executive order directing all state agencies to immediately implement the terms of the proposition.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening a potentially controversial era in American politics, a federal judge Tuesday gave the Arizona Democratic Party the green light to hold the nation's first binding election that will accept ballots from the Internet. After nearly 10 hours of testimony, U.S. District Judge Paul G. Rosenblatt ruled that the Voting Integrity Project of Arlington, Va.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Declaring that "the diverse and multicultural character of our society is widely recognized as . . . among our greatest strengths," a federal appeals court in San Francisco struck down an Arizona law that ordered state employees performing government business to speak and write only in English. USC law professor Erwin Chemerinsky said the ruling is quite significant because "it is the first decision overturning a state English-only initiative."
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | Associated Press
A judge has thrown out five of the six charges against a man accused of conspiring to ship explosives detonators to the Irish Republican Army. U.S. District Judge John Roll dismissed all but one charge against Patrick Moley, 30, at the close of the prosecution's case against him and five other co-defendants Thursday. Roll rejected a defense motion to dismiss charges against the other five defendants.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2008 | Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Thursday upheld a controversial new Arizona law that mandates the closure of businesses that knowingly hire illegal immigrants. U.S. District Judge Neil Wake rejected the arguments of business and immigrant-rights groups, which sued saying the law was an unconstitutional usurping of the federal government's right to regulate immigration. "The act does not make employers conform to a stricter form of conduct than federal law," Wake wrote in his 37-page decision.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Declaring that "the diverse and multicultural character of our society is widely recognized as . . . among our greatest strengths," a federal appeals court in San Francisco struck down an Arizona law that ordered state employees performing government business to speak and write only in English. USC law professor Erwin Chemerinsky said the ruling is quite significant because "it is the first decision overturning a state English-only initiative."
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Phoenix Superior Court judge who resigned after pleading guilty to conspiracy to possess marijuana was placed on three years' probation, fined $20,000 and ordered to spend 240 hours in community service telling his story to the public. Philip Marquardt, 57, a veteran of 20 years on the Maricopa County court, also was ordered to submit to periodic drug tests. The felony charge was filed against Marquardt after police intercepted a parcel addressed to him that contained 13 grams of marijuana.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | LAURA LAUGHLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Superior Court Judge Philip Marquardt, a 20-year veteran of the bench, resigned Thursday after pleading guilty to conspiracy to possess marijuana, a felony, and admitting he was addicted to the drug. The Maricopa County judge, 56, who was retained by voters in 1988 despite a misdemeanor marijuana conviction that year, faces up to 22 months in prison. "I have a serious problem, an addiction to marijuana," Marquardt told a press conference.
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