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NEWS
June 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Supreme Court in Little Rock, Ark., threw a circuit judge off the bench, affirming an earlier ruling that he wrote hot checks, failed to pay his federal income tax and engaged in other misconduct. Morris Thompson became the first Arkansas judge stripped of his robe by the state's highest court. Others facing severe disciplinary action have bowed out rather than fight to stay on the bench.
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NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A federal judge has struck down a portion of a law in Arkansas that bans most abortions after 12 weeks of pregnancy, reasoning that the fetus' viability, not heartbeat, determines the legality of such procedures. At issue was an Arkansas law passed last March that said a woman could not receive an abortion beyond 12 weeks if the fetus had a heartbeat, except in cases of rape, incest, if the woman's life was in danger or if the fetus had a highly lethal disorder. U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright ruled that viability - or the fetus' ability to survive outside the womb - was the determining factor in abortion law and that Arkansas' law was therefore unconstitutional.
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NEWS
February 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two members of an Arkansas Supreme Court committee who could hear ethics complaints against President Clinton have stepped aside from the cases. Carlton Bailey and Richard Reid have notified the Supreme Court Committee on Professional Conduct that they won't participate in matters relating to Clinton. The committee's executive director, James Neal, released a letter Friday making public the recusals, which usually are kept secret.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
An appointed judge with barely a month's experience decided Tuesday to preside over a lawsuit that could cost President Clinton his Arkansas law license. Pulaski County Circuit Judge Leon Johnson was the fifth choice for the job after four others stepped aside citing the appearance of conflicts of interest because of ties to Clinton, once governor of Arkansas.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A fourth Arkansas judge said Wednesday he could not accept the disbarment case against President Clinton, whose law license state authorities are attempting to revoke because of his admitted misstatements under oath about a sexual affair. A fifth judge, Leon Johnson, who was appointed by Gov. Mike Huckabee, a Republican, was assigned the case but said he would study it before deciding whether to hear it. In an order made public Wednesday, Judge Chris Piazza of Little Rock said: "Then-Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Religious cult leader Tony Alamo, appearing in a courtroom packed with longtime followers, was ordered Friday to be moved to Arkansas to face charges that he threatened to kidnap and hang a federal judge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1991 | From Religious News Service
Fugitive sect leader-entrepreneur Tony Alamo apparently made one too many phone calls. A grand jury indicted him recently after hearing testimony about phone calls Alamo allegedly made earlier this year to the editor of the Ft. Smith (Ark.) Southwest Times. The former Los Angeles area preacher fled criminal charges of child abuse in California in 1989, but he has periodically called newspapers from undisclosed locations to proclaim his innocence and accuse the Catholic Church and U.S.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
An appointed judge with barely a month's experience decided Tuesday to preside over a lawsuit that could cost President Clinton his Arkansas law license. Pulaski County Circuit Judge Leon Johnson was the fifth choice for the job after four others stepped aside citing the appearance of conflicts of interest because of ties to Clinton, once governor of Arkansas.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A federal judge has struck down a portion of a law in Arkansas that bans most abortions after 12 weeks of pregnancy, reasoning that the fetus' viability, not heartbeat, determines the legality of such procedures. At issue was an Arkansas law passed last March that said a woman could not receive an abortion beyond 12 weeks if the fetus had a heartbeat, except in cases of rape, incest, if the woman's life was in danger or if the fetus had a highly lethal disorder. U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright ruled that viability - or the fetus' ability to survive outside the womb - was the determining factor in abortion law and that Arkansas' law was therefore unconstitutional.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | PEGGY HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Isaac C. Parker was the law in these parts in the late 1800s, a "hanging judge" who sent 79 people to their deaths. As many as six people at one time swung from the gallows when he was on the bench. Locals nowadays regard Parker as a civilizing influence in the Old West, and they don't take kindly to outsiders who say his name doesn't belong on Fort Smith's federal courthouse.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A fourth Arkansas judge said Wednesday he could not accept the disbarment case against President Clinton, whose law license state authorities are attempting to revoke because of his admitted misstatements under oath about a sexual affair. A fifth judge, Leon Johnson, who was appointed by Gov. Mike Huckabee, a Republican, was assigned the case but said he would study it before deciding whether to hear it. In an order made public Wednesday, Judge Chris Piazza of Little Rock said: "Then-Gov.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Supreme Court in Little Rock, Ark., threw a circuit judge off the bench, affirming an earlier ruling that he wrote hot checks, failed to pay his federal income tax and engaged in other misconduct. Morris Thompson became the first Arkansas judge stripped of his robe by the state's highest court. Others facing severe disciplinary action have bowed out rather than fight to stay on the bench.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two members of an Arkansas Supreme Court committee who could hear ethics complaints against President Clinton have stepped aside from the cases. Carlton Bailey and Richard Reid have notified the Supreme Court Committee on Professional Conduct that they won't participate in matters relating to Clinton. The committee's executive director, James Neal, released a letter Friday making public the recusals, which usually are kept secret.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
In a virtually unprecedented slap at a higher court, a federal district judge in Little Rock, Ark., has accused the U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals of basing a decision in a pending Whitewater criminal case on "hearsay, hearsay on hearsay and triple hearsay contained in media reports." Judge Bill Wilson said that the appellate court had acted unfairly in removing another district judge, Henry Woods, from a still-pending case against former Gov.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | PEGGY HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Isaac C. Parker was the law in these parts in the late 1800s, a "hanging judge" who sent 79 people to their deaths. As many as six people at one time swung from the gallows when he was on the bench. Locals nowadays regard Parker as a civilizing influence in the Old West, and they don't take kindly to outsiders who say his name doesn't belong on Fort Smith's federal courthouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Religious cult leader Tony Alamo, appearing in a courtroom packed with longtime followers, was ordered Friday to be moved to Arkansas to face charges that he threatened to kidnap and hang a federal judge.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
In a virtually unprecedented slap at a higher court, a federal district judge in Little Rock, Ark., has accused the U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals of basing a decision in a pending Whitewater criminal case on "hearsay, hearsay on hearsay and triple hearsay contained in media reports." Judge Bill Wilson said that the appellate court had acted unfairly in removing another district judge, Henry Woods, from a still-pending case against former Gov.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
North Dakota's law banning abortions after 6 weeks of pregnancy is unconstitutional, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, striking down what critics had called the nation's most extreme limit on the procedure. The law, which was approved last year but never took effect, made it a crime for a woman to abort a fetus with a detectable heartbeat. Offending doctors faced up to five years in prison. An exception was allowed for medical emergencies. U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland said the law was “in direct contradiction” of the Supreme Court's 40-year-old decision in Roe vs. Wade, which established “viability” as the critical point at which states could begin restricting abortions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1991 | From Religious News Service
Fugitive sect leader-entrepreneur Tony Alamo apparently made one too many phone calls. A grand jury indicted him recently after hearing testimony about phone calls Alamo allegedly made earlier this year to the editor of the Ft. Smith (Ark.) Southwest Times. The former Los Angeles area preacher fled criminal charges of child abuse in California in 1989, but he has periodically called newspapers from undisclosed locations to proclaim his innocence and accuse the Catholic Church and U.S.
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