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June 7, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Justice Allen E. Broussard has urged that Gov. Pete Wilson name another black jurist as his replacement when he retires in August from the state Supreme Court. Broussard, only the second black to serve on the high court and one of its leading liberal members for a decade, on Thursday confirmed remarks attributed to him during a recent dinner held in his honor in Sacramento.
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NEWS
March 2, 2000
Harold M. Mulvey, 86, a Connecticut judge who presided over the murder trials of Black Panthers in the 1970s. After a jury deadlocked on a verdict, Mulvey dismissed murder and kidnapping charges against national Black Panther leader Bobby Seale and Ericka Huggins, a leader of the group's Connecticut chapter. They had been charged in connection with the torture and killing of Alex Rackley, a member of the New York chapter of the Black Panthers, who was suspected of being a police informant.
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NEWS
March 2, 2000
Harold M. Mulvey, 86, a Connecticut judge who presided over the murder trials of Black Panthers in the 1970s. After a jury deadlocked on a verdict, Mulvey dismissed murder and kidnapping charges against national Black Panther leader Bobby Seale and Ericka Huggins, a leader of the group's Connecticut chapter. They had been charged in connection with the torture and killing of Alex Rackley, a member of the New York chapter of the Black Panthers, who was suspected of being a police informant.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | BILL MILLER, THE WASHINGTON POST
A federal judge ruled Friday that black farmers can pursue their highly publicized discrimination case against the Agriculture Department as a class action. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman means that the farmers can sue the government as a large group rather than pursuing cases individually.
NEWS
September 13, 1994 | From Associated Press
A divided federal appeals panel threw out state-drawn boundaries of a black-majority Georgia congressional district and placed elections there on hold so the judges can redraw the district themselves. The panel agreed with white voters who challenged the district's lines that it was gerrymandered to provide more black voters, in violation of the Constitution.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | Associated Press
The "Black Widow" killer won a temporary stay of execution from a federal judge Thursday, just four hours before she was to go to the electric chair for poisoning her husband. U.S. District Judge Patricia Fawsett blocked the scheduled 12:01 p.m. execution of Judi Buenoano at Florida State Prison in order to hear arguments on whether the state's electric chair can malfunction and cruelly torture a prisoner. The defense contends it can, citing the state's botched execution May 4 of Jesse Tafero.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | BILL MILLER, THE WASHINGTON POST
A federal judge ruled Friday that black farmers can pursue their highly publicized discrimination case against the Agriculture Department as a class action. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman means that the farmers can sue the government as a large group rather than pursuing cases individually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1991 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defense attorney looked squarely at the 12 potential jurors in the Vista municipal courtroom--11 whites and a Hawaiian--and asked them to assess how racially prejudiced they were. "Does anyone want to admit to racial bias?" defense attorney David Pflaum asked, flat out. No one raised a hand. At issue were allegations of a racial hate crime, the first of its kind in North County since a new state civil rights law was enacted four years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1996 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decrying what it called an example of common police practice, a federal appeals court on Monday upheld a judgment against a Santa Monica police officer who arrested two black men at gunpoint because they bore a resemblance to armed robbery suspects. The lack of probable cause illustrated how police throughout the Los Angeles area routinely violate the constitutional rights of blacks, the three-judge panel said in a unanimous ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1996 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decrying what it called an example of common police practice, a federal appeals court on Monday upheld a judgment against a Santa Monica police officer who arrested two black men at gunpoint because they bore a resemblance to armed robbery suspects. The lack of probable cause illustrated how police throughout the Los Angeles area routinely violate the constitutional rights of blacks, the three-judge panel said in a unanimous ruling.
NEWS
September 13, 1994 | From Associated Press
A divided federal appeals panel threw out state-drawn boundaries of a black-majority Georgia congressional district and placed elections there on hold so the judges can redraw the district themselves. The panel agreed with white voters who challenged the district's lines that it was gerrymandered to provide more black voters, in violation of the Constitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1991 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defense attorney looked squarely at the 12 potential jurors in the Vista municipal courtroom--11 whites and a Hawaiian--and asked them to assess how racially prejudiced they were. "Does anyone want to admit to racial bias?" defense attorney David Pflaum asked, flat out. No one raised a hand. At issue were allegations of a racial hate crime, the first of its kind in North County since a new state civil rights law was enacted four years ago.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Justice Allen E. Broussard has urged that Gov. Pete Wilson name another black jurist as his replacement when he retires in August from the state Supreme Court. Broussard, only the second black to serve on the high court and one of its leading liberal members for a decade, on Thursday confirmed remarks attributed to him during a recent dinner held in his honor in Sacramento.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | Associated Press
The "Black Widow" killer won a temporary stay of execution from a federal judge Thursday, just four hours before she was to go to the electric chair for poisoning her husband. U.S. District Judge Patricia Fawsett blocked the scheduled 12:01 p.m. execution of Judi Buenoano at Florida State Prison in order to hear arguments on whether the state's electric chair can malfunction and cruelly torture a prisoner. The defense contends it can, citing the state's botched execution May 4 of Jesse Tafero.
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