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NEWS
May 17, 1992 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of every four judges appointed by Gov. Pete Wilson contributed to his gubernatorial campaign in amounts as high as $4,000 before being named, a Times review of Wilson's campaign records shows. Altogether, 17 of the 65 men and women whom Wilson placed on the bench or elevated to a higher court through April gave him campaign money, according to the records.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013 | By Paige St. John, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A trio of federal judges ordered Gov. Jerry Brown to immediately begin freeing state inmates and waived state laws to allow early releases, threatening the governor with contempt if he does not comply. Citing California's "defiance," "intransigence" and "deliberate failure" to provide inmates with adequate care in its overcrowded lockups, the judges on Thursday said Brown must shed 9,600 inmates - about 8% of the prison population - by the end of the year. Unless he finds another way to ease crowding, the governor must expand the credits that inmates can earn for good behavior or participation in rehabilitation programs, the judges said.
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NEWS
November 23, 1988 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
When Robert H. Furey Jr. ran for Los Angeles municipal judge two years ago, the voters lacked an important piece of information about him. Furey, a Catalina Justice Court judge, had been under investigation by the state Commission on Judicial Performance for 22 months for misconduct, including the repeated jailing of a woman who had filed a complaint about him. Furey lost the election, and eight days later the commission recommended to the state Supreme Court that he be removed from the bench.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California's legal efforts to end federal oversight of prison mental health care have run into trouble with the U.S. district judge hearing that case a second time. In an order filed Monday, Judge Lawrence Karlton asked California to explain why he should not throw out statements of four of the state's expert witnesses, who contend they found adequate mental health care in the 10 prisons they toured. Lawyers for prisoners contend the experts' testimony was based on secret tours of the state's prisons that were organized in 2011, without notifying plaintiffs or the court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2001 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a recess in a murder trial last month, Deputy Public Defender Jeffrey Gilliam answered an emergency page from his wife, who was eight months pregnant. Using the court clerk's phone, he heard her, frightened and crying, tell him that the baby was in serious trouble and that she was being rushed from her Tarzana doctor's office across the street to the hospital for an emergency caesarean section. Gilliam promised he would be out of court and on his way immediately.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The discovery of electronic devices that could have enabled security officers to hear conversations in private judicial chambers set off a flurry of concern and controversy Friday at the state Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal. The devices were installed as part of an elaborate security system in the new offices of the high court and the appellate court that serves the San Francisco region.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a potential violation of a written ethics policy, the top judge of California's workers' compensation system acknowledges that he and other jurists have collected thousands of dollars in fees by conducting seminars for lawyers who appear in their courts.
NEWS
November 13, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis' first judicial appointees are more diverse and moderate than those named by his predecessors, but their qualifications have failed to diminish continuing criticism that the administration is making support for the death penalty a crucial test for the bench. After 10 months in office, Davis recently appointed 12 judges, all of them Democrats described as "centrist" or "moderate to liberal" by lawyers and judges, who generally praise them for their acumen and balance.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a nationally watched gun control case, a federal court judge has thrown out a challenge by the National Rifle Assn. to California's landmark ban on military-style assault weapons. In a decision made public on Monday, U.S. District Judge Edward Dean Price in Fresno dismissed the lawsuit which sought, among other things, to strike down the 1989 law on grounds it violated the Constitution's 2nd Amendment right to bear arms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1997 | TINA NGUYEN
The first Vietnamese American appointed to the California judiciary will be honored today at a Westminster reception hosted by the Vietnamese American Bar Assn. Judge Thang Nguyen Barrett of San Jose was appointed to the Santa Clara County Municipal Court last February by Gov. Pete Wilson. "Barrett will bring sensitivity to ethnic issues and cultural understanding in the court system," said Lan Nguyen, a board member of the 150-member bar association based in Westminster.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
You can almost hear the sighs of relief coming from art galleries and auction houses up and down California: Federal Judge Jacqueline Nguyen has declared the California Resale Royalty Act unconstitutional. The highly controversial, widely misunderstood and little enforced state law that took effect in 1977 was designed to provide artists with 5% of their resale prices under certain conditions. As written, the law would apply to a resale of an original work of art provided this sale takes place in California or the seller resides in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — State Controller John Chiang did not have the authority to dock legislators' pay last summer after concluding that the budget they passed was not balanced, according to a tentative court ruling Tuesday. The Legislature meets its obligation to pass a budget when it sends the governor a bill that, "on its face," proposes spending that does not exceed revenue, wrote Sacramento County Superior Court Judge David I. Brown. He will consider finalizing the ruling at a hearing Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2011 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
A federal judge on Thursday temporarily halted California's ability to enforce rules to reduce the carbon footprint of transportation fuels, effectively taking the regulatory teeth out of the state's year-old program. U.S. District Judge Lawrence O'Neill issued a preliminary injunction that ruled the California Air Resources Board's low-carbon fuel regulations violated the U.S. Constitution's commerce clause by discriminating against crude oil and biofuels producers located outside California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2011 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
A sweeping lawsuit against former city leaders in Bell has been tossed out by a Los Angeles County judge who for months has warned that the attorney general's case seemed flawed and politically inspired. Superior Court Judge Ralph W. Dau made it clear in earlier hearings that he believed then-Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown was overstepping his authority when he sought to recover money from officials who earned some of the highest municipal salaries in the nation. Brown was campaigning for governor at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Charles E. Horan rejoiced over last month's state audit that savaged the California court system's mismanagement of a costly new computer system. "This is the sort of thing we have been complaining about," exulted the Pomona judge. "Do you think perhaps now people ought to pay attention to what we're saying?" In 2009, Horan helped found a group of judges to challenge the power and authority of the state's judicial leadership. After two years of being marginalized as a fringe clique of black-robed dissidents, the group of largely anonymous judges is now making friends in Sacramento and gathering strength.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
New legal challenges threaten to further delay California's effort to resume executions despite five years of costly reforms and reconstruction to meet a federal judge's concerns that previous procedures might have inflicted cruel and unusual punishment. U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel on Tuesday toured San Quentin State Prison's new $900,000 execution facility, questioning state corrections authorities about the death penalty machinery and methods revised to address the concerns that led him to halt executions in 2006.
NEWS
February 12, 1998 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate voted 67-28 Wednesday to confirm Los Angeles lawyer Margaret M. Morrow as a federal district judge, even as it sent another Clinton nominee for the federal bench back to the Judiciary Committee for further scrutiny. Morrow's appointment fills one of three vacancies among about 65 judgeships in the Central District of California. Nationwide, about one-tenth of the estimated 800 slots on the federal bench are vacant.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. George Deukmejian's nomination of his former aide, Appellate Justice Marvin R. Baxter, to the California Supreme Court will draw little opposition when a state commission meets to consider the appointment Tuesday in Los Angeles. The state Judicial Appointments Commission said Friday that six judges and lawyers are set to testify in support of Baxter, but that only one attorney has asked to speak against him. The absence of significant opposition appears to assure his confirmation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2010 | By Anthony York, Special to the Los Angeles Times
State officials dodged a $2-billion bullet Tuesday when a judge ruled that last year's shift of funds away from redevelopment agencies to pay for schools was legal. In a 26-page ruling, Sacramento County Superior Court Judge Lloyd Connelly said the state was within its rights to move the money. The maneuver saves more than $1.7 billion in the current budget year and $350 million for the 2010-2011 budget year. Legislators have been trying to borrow from and shift various pots of money as part of their continuing effort to balance the state's books, which are more than $18 billion out of whack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2010 | By Gerrick Kennedy
With the debate on medical marijuana still at a full boil in Los Angeles, a judge Friday ordered the return of 60 pounds of pot to a man after his attorneys successfully argued that a state law gave him the right to transport it. Saguro Doven, 33, was initially charged with possession of marijuana for sale and transportation of the drug, a violation of the state's health and safety code. The marijuana was bundled in individual bags that were tucked inside a larger duffel bag when Doven was pulled over on the 101 Freeway by a California Highway Patrol officer, according to court records.
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