Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudges Colombia
IN THE NEWS

Judges Colombia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 2, 1989
Colombia, where more than 50 judges have been killed in the last decade, said it will increase its protection of the judiciary. Police Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez told reporters in Bogota, the capital, that judges handling sensitive cases will be given offices inside bases of the national police and the elite state security department. His pledge came after about 18,000 judges and judicial officials went on strike to press for more protection after the recent gangland-style slaying of a colleague.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A judge sentenced the two top bosses of the Cali cocaine cartel to 10 1/2- and nine-year prison terms for leading the world's largest drug syndicate. The comparatively light sentences angered Colombian and U.S. officials. It was the first criminal ruling against Gilberto and Miguel Rodriguez, the brothers who ran the world's largest cocaine ring. Each man still has at least four other cases pending against him.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Judges and court workers began a series of nationwide strikes Thursday after a judge and a congressman were murdered, apparently by drug traffickers. In Medellin, where the judge was killed, federal justices walked off the job indefinitely until they receive more protection. It is the third time that judges have gone on strike in the last three months to protest assassinations.
NEWS
December 22, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any Colombian with a gripe can take it to the judge. And not just in small claims court. Colombians who believe their rights have been violated can demand justice from any judge within 10 days--and then take their complaints all the way to the Supreme Court. Supreme Court justices contend they are flooded with thousands of frivolous claims that delay their decisions on important cases.
NEWS
September 25, 1989
Proposals to dispose of trash by rail transportation to landfill sites in the Southern California desert make more sense than others previously mentioned, including local incineration, waste separation and recycling. There is virtually an unlimited capacity in the desert for such disposal, and the fact of an ever increasing amount of trash, and the running out of local landfill sites make the adoption of this plan both imperative and inevitable.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Colombian judges ended a three-day strike for protection from drug traffickers, but they said their demands were not met. The judges threatened to strike again if the Colombian government does not improve security measures. The government has reportedly said the measures are due next week.
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A judge sentenced the two top bosses of the Cali cocaine cartel to 10 1/2- and nine-year prison terms for leading the world's largest drug syndicate. The comparatively light sentences angered Colombian and U.S. officials. It was the first criminal ruling against Gilberto and Miguel Rodriguez, the brothers who ran the world's largest cocaine ring. Each man still has at least four other cases pending against him.
NEWS
August 18, 1989
Gunmen on motorcycles shot and killed a Colombian judge hours after he upheld an arrest warrant for a reputed Medellin drug cartel leader. Police said Judge Carlos Ernesto Valencia was ambushed shortly after he left his office for home. The judge's bodyguard and two passers-by were also wounded. Earlier in the day, Valencia upheld an arrest warrant for reputed cartel leader Pablo Escobar on charges of masterminding the December, 1986, killing of newspaper publisher Guillermo Cano.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The brutal slaying of two judges and 10 judicial employees by a rural death squad in January jolted Colombians with the frightening realization that their country has become a land where the law of the gun prevails. Colombian courts are a shambles. Murder, threats, bribery, inefficiency and under-funding have broken down the justice system, virtually giving legal immunity to growing hordes of killers, drug traffickers and other criminals.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | Associated Press
A judge who illegally released a reputed leader of the Medellin drug cartel has been sentenced to six years in prison for obstruction of justice, a federal court said Tuesday. Fabio Pastrana Hoyos was fired from his post as a customs judge in the Caribbean coastal city of Cartagena after his 1986 order freeing Jorge Luis Ochoa Vasquez, considered the second in command of the drug-trafficking cartel.
NEWS
March 30, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Tuesday allowed accused CIA spy Aldrich H. Ames and his wife, Rosario, to draw $500 a month from a Colombian bank account to pay for the care of their 5-year-old son while they await trial behind bars. The source of the money in the account is a matter of dispute, with U.S. District Judge Claude Hilton finding that $111,000 had been transferred to the Colombian account from funds the Russians allegedly put in Ames' Swiss bank account. But William B. Cummings, Mrs.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
A senior official says a recent Supreme Court decision means Colombia will have to return most if not all of the property seized from drug traffickers, dealing a grave blow to the anti-drug campaign. Judges have already returned 33 of the 430 farms, houses and other properties--worth at least $23 million--that were confiscated by presidential decree, the official said Thursday. He spoke on condition of anonymity. The Supreme Court ruling late last year overturned the presidential decree.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | Associated Press
A judge who illegally released a reputed leader of the Medellin drug cartel has been sentenced to six years in prison for obstruction of justice, a federal court said Tuesday. Fabio Pastrana Hoyos was fired from his post as a customs judge in the Caribbean coastal city of Cartagena after his 1986 order freeing Jorge Luis Ochoa Vasquez, considered the second in command of the drug-trafficking cartel.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Judges and court workers began a series of nationwide strikes Thursday after a judge and a congressman were murdered, apparently by drug traffickers. In Medellin, where the judge was killed, federal justices walked off the job indefinitely until they receive more protection. It is the third time that judges have gone on strike in the last three months to protest assassinations.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Colombian judges ended a three-day strike for protection from drug traffickers, but they said their demands were not met. The judges threatened to strike again if the Colombian government does not improve security measures. The government has reportedly said the measures are due next week.
NEWS
September 25, 1989
Proposals to dispose of trash by rail transportation to landfill sites in the Southern California desert make more sense than others previously mentioned, including local incineration, waste separation and recycling. There is virtually an unlimited capacity in the desert for such disposal, and the fact of an ever increasing amount of trash, and the running out of local landfill sites make the adoption of this plan both imperative and inevitable.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
A senior official says a recent Supreme Court decision means Colombia will have to return most if not all of the property seized from drug traffickers, dealing a grave blow to the anti-drug campaign. Judges have already returned 33 of the 430 farms, houses and other properties--worth at least $23 million--that were confiscated by presidential decree, the official said Thursday. He spoke on condition of anonymity. The Supreme Court ruling late last year overturned the presidential decree.
NEWS
December 22, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any Colombian with a gripe can take it to the judge. And not just in small claims court. Colombians who believe their rights have been violated can demand justice from any judge within 10 days--and then take their complaints all the way to the Supreme Court. Supreme Court justices contend they are flooded with thousands of frivolous claims that delay their decisions on important cases.
NEWS
August 18, 1989
Gunmen on motorcycles shot and killed a Colombian judge hours after he upheld an arrest warrant for a reputed Medellin drug cartel leader. Police said Judge Carlos Ernesto Valencia was ambushed shortly after he left his office for home. The judge's bodyguard and two passers-by were also wounded. Earlier in the day, Valencia upheld an arrest warrant for reputed cartel leader Pablo Escobar on charges of masterminding the December, 1986, killing of newspaper publisher Guillermo Cano.
NEWS
August 2, 1989
Colombia, where more than 50 judges have been killed in the last decade, said it will increase its protection of the judiciary. Police Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez told reporters in Bogota, the capital, that judges handling sensitive cases will be given offices inside bases of the national police and the elite state security department. His pledge came after about 18,000 judges and judicial officials went on strike to press for more protection after the recent gangland-style slaying of a colleague.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|