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April 29, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a siege of the Supreme Court here entered its third day Wednesday, the pace of negotiations quickened abruptly when gunmen released two justices to shuttle proposals between the kidnapers and government representatives. "We are negotiating," said Foreign Minister Bernd Niehaus Quesada in his most positive public declarations since four gunmen stormed the Supreme Court on Monday and seized 19 of the nation's top magistrates and five employees. "I am optimistic . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
Former state Sen. Paul Carpenter's on-again, off-again extradition from Costa Rica was on again Thursday. Carpenter, who fled the United States before he could be jailed on federal political corruption convictions, was ordered extradited by a Costa Rican judge, U.S. Atty. Charles Stevens said. The judge originally ordered Carpenter extradited in May. But in July, a Costa Rican appellate court overturned that order on procedural grounds and ordered additional review of the case.
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NEWS
April 27, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Gunmen from an obscure guerrilla group calling itself the "Commando of Death" took 19 of Costa Rica's 22 Supreme Court magistrates hostage on Monday. Officials said at least five heavily armed assailants apparently broke into the Central American country's Supreme Court building from the basement and seized the magistrates, who were holding a meeting. gunmen held 20 hostages in all, including Supreme Court President Edgar Cervantes and the court secretary.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a siege of the Supreme Court here entered its third day Wednesday, the pace of negotiations quickened abruptly when gunmen released two justices to shuttle proposals between the kidnapers and government representatives. "We are negotiating," said Foreign Minister Bernd Niehaus Quesada in his most positive public declarations since four gunmen stormed the Supreme Court on Monday and seized 19 of the nation's top magistrates and five employees. "I am optimistic . . .
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gunmen who kidnaped 19 Costa Rican Supreme Court justices threatened Tuesday to blow up their hostages if demands, including an $8-million ransom, are not met. Calling themselves the "Commando of Death," the kidnapers set a 3 p.m. Tuesday deadline for a response from the government. But as reporters and police kept a vigil outside the Supreme Court building in downtown San Jose, the deadline passed without apparent incident. The kidnapers set a new deadline for 1 p.m. today (noon PDT).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
Former state Sen. Paul Carpenter's on-again, off-again extradition from Costa Rica was on again Thursday. Carpenter, who fled the United States before he could be jailed on federal political corruption convictions, was ordered extradited by a Costa Rican judge, U.S. Atty. Charles Stevens said. The judge originally ordered Carpenter extradited in May. But in July, a Costa Rican appellate court overturned that order on procedural grounds and ordered additional review of the case.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gunmen who kidnaped 19 Costa Rican Supreme Court justices threatened Tuesday to blow up their hostages if demands, including an $8-million ransom, are not met. Calling themselves the "Commando of Death," the kidnapers set a 3 p.m. Tuesday deadline for a response from the government. But as reporters and police kept a vigil outside the Supreme Court building in downtown San Jose, the deadline passed without apparent incident. The kidnapers set a new deadline for 1 p.m. today (noon PDT).
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Gunmen from an obscure guerrilla group calling itself the "Commando of Death" took 19 of Costa Rica's 22 Supreme Court magistrates hostage on Monday. Officials said at least five heavily armed assailants apparently broke into the Central American country's Supreme Court building from the basement and seized the magistrates, who were holding a meeting. gunmen held 20 hostages in all, including Supreme Court President Edgar Cervantes and the court secretary.
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