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NEWS
December 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
In an unprecedented move, Britain's highest court Thursday set aside its own ruling against Gen. Augusto Pinochet because a judge failed to disclose his ties to Amnesty International. The decision rattled the judiciary and stalled Spain's efforts to extradite the former Chilean dictator. Responding to the legal debacle in the House of Lords, the head of Britain's judiciary said top judges must be required to declare possible conflicts and withdraw from cases where bias might be inferred.
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NATIONAL
September 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
TEXAS A military judge at Ft. Hood reversed himself and decided to let prosecutors use a statement that Army Pfc. Lynndie England gave to investigators implicating herself in the abuse of prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Jury selection and opening statements are expected today in England's court-martial on seven counts of conspiracy and prisoner abuse. The judge presiding over the case, Col.
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NEWS
December 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Lawyers argued that South African-born Lord Justice Leonard Hoffmann, who denied retired Chilean Gen. Augusto Pinochet immunity from arrest, was biased because of his ties to Amnesty International. The judge heads Amnesty's fund-raising arm. The House of Lords, Britain's highest court, is being asked to overturn the Lords' own Nov. 25 judgment against Pinochet that opens the way for his extradition to Spain.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
In an unprecedented move, Britain's highest court Thursday set aside its own ruling against Gen. Augusto Pinochet because a judge failed to disclose his ties to Amnesty International. The decision rattled the judiciary and stalled Spain's efforts to extradite the former Chilean dictator. Responding to the legal debacle in the House of Lords, the head of Britain's judiciary said top judges must be required to declare possible conflicts and withdraw from cases where bias might be inferred.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2008 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
When the Supreme Court goes on recess at the end of this month, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy will be off to his summer teaching job in Salzburg, Austria. For the 19th year, he will teach a class called "Fundamental Rights in Europe and the United States" for the McGeorge Law School. He tells his American and European students that the belief in individual freedom and the respect for human dignity transcends national borders.
NATIONAL
September 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
TEXAS A military judge at Ft. Hood reversed himself and decided to let prosecutors use a statement that Army Pfc. Lynndie England gave to investigators implicating herself in the abuse of prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Jury selection and opening statements are expected today in England's court-martial on seven counts of conspiracy and prisoner abuse. The judge presiding over the case, Col.
NEWS
June 6, 1985 | NANCY GRAHAM, Times Staff Writer
About 300 mourners gathered Sunday for memorial services for Municipal Court Judge Timothy England, 43, who was killed last week when the van in which he was a passenger collided with another car in Los Banos in Merced County. Court employees, judges, prosecuting and defense attorneys, police officers and victim-assistance workers were among those who crowded into the small chapel.
WORLD
July 13, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Civil and family court judges in England and Wales will dispense with their wigs next year, although the tradition will continue in the criminal courts, the lord chief justice said Thursday. Judges will also use the same gowns throughout the year, Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers said. Judges and lawyers here have worn horsehair wigs since the 17th century. In the family civil courts, judges and lawyers will not only go without wigs, but will dispense with wing collars, effective Jan.
NEWS
May 2, 1995 | MAGGIE FARLEY
The key issues for the reversion of Hong Kong to Chinese rule in 1997 include the system of governance, the courts and the press. How they shape up: LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL Hong Kong and Beijing are at odds over democracy. China does not explicitly reject it and has promised that all 60 members of the Legislative Council will be directly elected by 2007, up from 20 now. But as one China supporter has said, "Beijing . . . wants to know the results of the election before it happens."
SPORTS
June 5, 1996 | ALLAN MALAMUD
There were numerous lawyers, judges, professors and business executives at the 40th reunion of the Harvard Law School class of '56. . . . But Bob Arum was the only boxing promoter. . . . "The snooty guys from the prep schools and the eating clubs didn't have much to say to me," Arum said. "In other words, not much has changed since I was a student." . . .
NEWS
December 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Lawyers argued that South African-born Lord Justice Leonard Hoffmann, who denied retired Chilean Gen. Augusto Pinochet immunity from arrest, was biased because of his ties to Amnesty International. The judge heads Amnesty's fund-raising arm. The House of Lords, Britain's highest court, is being asked to overturn the Lords' own Nov. 25 judgment against Pinochet that opens the way for his extradition to Spain.
NEWS
June 6, 1985 | NANCY GRAHAM, Times Staff Writer
About 300 mourners gathered Sunday for memorial services for Municipal Court Judge Timothy England, 43, who was killed last week when the van in which he was a passenger collided with another car in Los Banos in Merced County. Court employees, judges, prosecuting and defense attorneys, police officers and victim-assistance workers were among those who crowded into the small chapel.
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