Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudges Illinois
IN THE NEWS

Judges Illinois

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judge in TV Rerun Case Asked to Step Aside: The Federal Communications Commission has asked a federal appeals judge to disqualify himself from the legal fight over whether the major broadcast networks should be allowed to sell lucrative TV reruns. Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in Chicago was part of a three-judge panel that last month threw out the FCC's 1991 decision that continued to block the networks from full participation in the syndication business.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Illinois Supreme Court justice who wrote the fiercely disputed Baby Richard ruling survived an impeachment effort over his attempts to duck traffic tickets and other alleged abuses of power. A state House panel voted, 8-2, against impeaching 63-year-old James Heiple. The justice has charged that he is a victim of lingering resentment over the Baby Richard ruling, the 1994 decision that took a 4-year-old boy away from his adoptive parents.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush plans to nominate Joe B. McDade, an Illinois state judge from Peoria, to be a federal district judge. McDade, 53, will be nominated for a new federal judgeship for the central district of Illinois.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judge in TV Rerun Case Asked to Step Aside: The Federal Communications Commission has asked a federal appeals judge to disqualify himself from the legal fight over whether the major broadcast networks should be allowed to sell lucrative TV reruns. Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in Chicago was part of a three-judge panel that last month threw out the FCC's 1991 decision that continued to block the networks from full participation in the syndication business.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Cook County judge has been indicted in Chicago, charged with stealing more than $15,000 by fining people convicted of crimes and then having them pay the fines directly to him. Associate Judge Paul T. Foxgrover, 51, was indicted on 86 felony counts and 22 misdemeanor counts after a three-month investigation. The charges included counts of theft, forgery, official misconduct and obstruction of justice.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | United Press International
Former Cook County Circuit Judge Martin Hogan was found guilty Monday of taking bribes, becoming the 13th jurist convicted in the federal Operation Greylord investigation of the nation's largest court system. Hogan, 48, was convicted of one count each of racketeering and racketeering conspiracy and three counts of filing false income tax returns.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Illinois Supreme Court justice who wrote the fiercely disputed Baby Richard ruling survived an impeachment effort over his attempts to duck traffic tickets and other alleged abuses of power. A state House panel voted, 8-2, against impeaching 63-year-old James Heiple. The justice has charged that he is a victim of lingering resentment over the Baby Richard ruling, the 1994 decision that took a 4-year-old boy away from his adoptive parents.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2006 | Christi Parsons, Chicago Tribune
A day after their chamber passed a measure to strengthen security for federal judges, Illinois' U.S. senators on Thursday urged the House to quickly approve the bill, which was inspired by the slayings of a judge's relatives last year in Chicago. The lame-duck House session is scheduled to end this week. The proposed Court Security Improvement Act would increase penalties for people who threaten or harass judges and would allow the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2001
When compared with Texas, which operates a virtual assembly line to the death chamber, California is slow and deliberative in imposing the ultimate punishment. More than 500 inmates sit on California's death row, but only nine people have been executed in the last 35 years. The state's mandatory appellate review in capital cases and local standards regarding the assignment of trial judges and counsel help to prevent or reverse wrongful convictions.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The 2nd Amendment's "right to keep and bear arms" is proving to be a right to keep a gun at home, but so far not a right to bear a loaded firearm in public. The Supreme Court breathed new life into the amendment when it struck down strict handgun bans in Washington and Chicago and spoke of the "inherent right of self-defense. " But to the dismay of gun rights advocates, judges in recent months have read those decisions narrowly and rejected claims from those who said they had a constitutional right to carry a loaded gun on their person or in their car. Instead, these judges from California to Maryland have said the "core right" to a gun is limited to the home.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush plans to nominate Joe B. McDade, an Illinois state judge from Peoria, to be a federal district judge. McDade, 53, will be nominated for a new federal judgeship for the central district of Illinois.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Cook County judge has been indicted in Chicago, charged with stealing more than $15,000 by fining people convicted of crimes and then having them pay the fines directly to him. Associate Judge Paul T. Foxgrover, 51, was indicted on 86 felony counts and 22 misdemeanor counts after a three-month investigation. The charges included counts of theft, forgery, official misconduct and obstruction of justice.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | United Press International
Former Cook County Circuit Judge Martin Hogan was found guilty Monday of taking bribes, becoming the 13th jurist convicted in the federal Operation Greylord investigation of the nation's largest court system. Hogan, 48, was convicted of one count each of racketeering and racketeering conspiracy and three counts of filing false income tax returns.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2002 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- In a surprising, unanimous defeat for the boating industry, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that swimmers or boaters who are injured in propeller accidents can sue the engine makers for failing to install propeller guards. The ruling clears the way for the husband of an Illinois woman who died in a boating accident to sue Mercury Marine, which makes motors for recreational boats. The company is a division of Brunswick Corp. of Lake Forest, Ill.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air travelers who are irked by changes in their frequent-flier programs won the right Wednesday to sue the carriers for reneging on a promised benefit. In a 6-2 ruling, the Supreme Court said that the federal Airline Deregulation Act does not free the carriers from state lawsuits charging that they have breached a contract.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|