Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudges Italy
IN THE NEWS

Judges Italy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 27, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Suspected Mafia gunmen ambushed a senior Sicilian judge as he returned home to Palermo from a country weekend with his handicapped son, killing them both in a burst of automatic weapons fire, Italian police said Monday. Investigators could not immediately determine whether the attack was a personal vendetta against the judge or a broader attempt to intimidate Sicilian reformers fighting the Mafia on its own turf.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
November 5, 2009 | Maria De Cristofaro and Sebastian Rotella
A judge in Milan convicted 23 Americans today of the kidnapping of an Egyptian cleric in 2003, culminating a landmark trial that gave a look into the secret world of CIA renditions of terror suspects. Judge Oscar Magi acquitted three Americans, including the former CIA station chief in Italy, because they had diplomatic immunity when a secret team abducted militant cleric Abu Omar in Milan and flew him to Egypt, where he underwent months of torture and abuse. The Americans were tried in absentia, and given that the U.S. government has long declined to cooperate with the prosecution, it seemed unlikely that any of those convicted would spend time in an Italian prison.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's government will resign if a controversial decree limiting powers of arrest in corruption cases is kicked out by Italy's Parliament, the government spokesman said Friday. The remarks on live television by spokesman Giuliano Ferrara upped the stakes in a battle of wills that has pitted Berlusconi against Italy's graft-busting magistrates, some of his own coalition partners and a large slice of public opinion.
WORLD
June 19, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
The first trial involving one of the Bush administration's most controversial counter-terrorism practices was put on hold Monday by an Italian judge who decided to await a higher court's ruling on challenges to the case. The decision was a setback for prosecutors attempting to try 26 Americans, most of them CIA agents, for snatching a radical Muslim cleric off the streets of Milan in 2003 and transporting him to his native Egypt, where he has said he was tortured.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Judges reportedly subpoenaed Italy's anti-Mafia commissioner on accusations that he illegally overstepped his powers. Some politicians charged that the move was aimed at thwarting the work of Domenico Sica, one of Italy's most prominent investigators of terrorism and organized crime. Newspapers reported that Sica improperly obtained the fingerprint of a judge suspected of writing anonymous letters alleging that investigators aided Mafia figures who turned state's evidence.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The judge who has become the leader and symbol of Italy's biggest anti-corruption drive against the highest echelons of political and economic power resigned Tuesday, complaining that he could no longer carry out his duties because of outside interference.
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shamed by a savage Mafia assassination and public derision of government leaders, Italy's fragmented Parliament broke a prolonged stalemate Monday to elect conservative Roman Catholic Oscar Luigi Scalfaro as the country's figurehead president. The selection of the 73-year-old Christian Democrat clears the way for the formation of a new government, possibly including participation for the first time by Italy's former Communist Party.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nation mourning a slain hero poured scorn on its humiliated and paralyzed political leaders Sunday on a day of outrage after a Mafia assassination. "Shame! Out! Justice! Go back to Rome!" a crowd of Sicilians yelled at Italy's acting president and two Cabinet ministers as they entered the main courthouse in Palermo to pay their respects to Giovanni Falcone, a judge who was the Mafia's greatest enemy and who became its most illustrious victim Saturday.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior prosecuting magistrate in the government's war against the Mafia committed suicide in Palermo on Thursday, two days after learning that an informer had accused him of links with organized crime. The death of Judge Domenico Signorino, 48, stunned government officials on a day when an aggressive police campaign against organized crime notched major new arrests in both Sicily and mainland southern Italy.
WORLD
November 5, 2009 | Maria De Cristofaro and Sebastian Rotella
A judge in Milan convicted 23 Americans today of the kidnapping of an Egyptian cleric in 2003, culminating a landmark trial that gave a look into the secret world of CIA renditions of terror suspects. Judge Oscar Magi acquitted three Americans, including the former CIA station chief in Italy, because they had diplomatic immunity when a secret team abducted militant cleric Abu Omar in Milan and flew him to Egypt, where he underwent months of torture and abuse. The Americans were tried in absentia, and given that the U.S. government has long declined to cooperate with the prosecution, it seemed unlikely that any of those convicted would spend time in an Italian prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vocalist wore green rubber pants and croaked to the classical punk sound of a violin, cello, bass and saxophone. "Your smile disgusts me," he bellowed, turning a well-known fable on its head. "Kiss me. I want to turn back into a toad." Who let this scruffy quintet into Italy's premier song festival? Few institutions better exemplify Italians' fear and loathing of change than the San Remo Festival.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The judge who has become the leader and symbol of Italy's biggest anti-corruption drive against the highest echelons of political and economic power resigned Tuesday, complaining that he could no longer carry out his duties because of outside interference.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's government will resign if a controversial decree limiting powers of arrest in corruption cases is kicked out by Italy's Parliament, the government spokesman said Friday. The remarks on live television by spokesman Giuliano Ferrara upped the stakes in a battle of wills that has pitted Berlusconi against Italy's graft-busting magistrates, some of his own coalition partners and a large slice of public opinion.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior prosecuting magistrate in the government's war against the Mafia committed suicide in Palermo on Thursday, two days after learning that an informer had accused him of links with organized crime. The death of Judge Domenico Signorino, 48, stunned government officials on a day when an aggressive police campaign against organized crime notched major new arrests in both Sicily and mainland southern Italy.
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shamed by a savage Mafia assassination and public derision of government leaders, Italy's fragmented Parliament broke a prolonged stalemate Monday to elect conservative Roman Catholic Oscar Luigi Scalfaro as the country's figurehead president. The selection of the 73-year-old Christian Democrat clears the way for the formation of a new government, possibly including participation for the first time by Italy's former Communist Party.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nation mourning a slain hero poured scorn on its humiliated and paralyzed political leaders Sunday on a day of outrage after a Mafia assassination. "Shame! Out! Justice! Go back to Rome!" a crowd of Sicilians yelled at Italy's acting president and two Cabinet ministers as they entered the main courthouse in Palermo to pay their respects to Giovanni Falcone, a judge who was the Mafia's greatest enemy and who became its most illustrious victim Saturday.
WORLD
June 19, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
The first trial involving one of the Bush administration's most controversial counter-terrorism practices was put on hold Monday by an Italian judge who decided to await a higher court's ruling on challenges to the case. The decision was a setback for prosecutors attempting to try 26 Americans, most of them CIA agents, for snatching a radical Muslim cleric off the streets of Milan in 2003 and transporting him to his native Egypt, where he has said he was tortured.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vocalist wore green rubber pants and croaked to the classical punk sound of a violin, cello, bass and saxophone. "Your smile disgusts me," he bellowed, turning a well-known fable on its head. "Kiss me. I want to turn back into a toad." Who let this scruffy quintet into Italy's premier song festival? Few institutions better exemplify Italians' fear and loathing of change than the San Remo Festival.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Judges reportedly subpoenaed Italy's anti-Mafia commissioner on accusations that he illegally overstepped his powers. Some politicians charged that the move was aimed at thwarting the work of Domenico Sica, one of Italy's most prominent investigators of terrorism and organized crime. Newspapers reported that Sica improperly obtained the fingerprint of a judge suspected of writing anonymous letters alleging that investigators aided Mafia figures who turned state's evidence.
NEWS
September 27, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Suspected Mafia gunmen ambushed a senior Sicilian judge as he returned home to Palermo from a country weekend with his handicapped son, killing them both in a burst of automatic weapons fire, Italian police said Monday. Investigators could not immediately determine whether the attack was a personal vendetta against the judge or a broader attempt to intimidate Sicilian reformers fighting the Mafia on its own turf.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|