Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudges Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Judges Los Angeles

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Courthouse is not ordinarily open for business on weekends. But on Sunday, there was a new sign tacked to the door of Division 8A. "Probable Cause Determinations, Clerk's Office," it read. "Hours: Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays. 10:00-5:00." Inside, eight Municipal Court judges were at work in a large conference room sifting through arrest reports.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
A judge has blocked construction of a controversial 20-story condo tower in Hollywood after finding that Los Angeles officials failed to conduct a proper environmental review. The lawsuit was brought by the La Mirada Avenue Neighborhood Assn., the same organization suing the city over the recently passed Hollywood Community Plan, which changed zoning laws to allow for bigger and taller buildings in the historic neighborhood. At the heart of both lawsuits are issues of parking and traffic, and whether the city has adequately addressed the impacts of bringing new development - and people - to Hollywood.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
A Los Angeles federal judge has sent a letter to film director George Lucas' attorneys, asking Lucasfilm Ltd. to file a contempt proceeding against Luther Campbell, leader of the controversial rap group 2 Live Crew.q In the letter, U.S. District Court Judge James Ideman charged that Campbell may have violated the judge's May 9 order barring the rapper from using the name Luke Skywalker, a licensed trademark owned by Lucas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
A judge on Tuesday harshly criticized the Los Angeles Zoo for its care and housing of elephants and ordered changes to improve the animals' welfare, but also found that the treatment did not amount to abuse and the exhibit can remain open. "This case raises the question of whether the recreational or perhaps educational needs of one intelligent mammal species outweigh the physical and emotional, if not survival, needs of another," Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge John L. Segal wrote in his 56-page opinion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
The mandate from the community was to clean up the streets of Hollywood, and the job went to three of the toughest Municipal Court judges in Los Angeles. Elsewhere in the county, prostitutes and their customers rarely are sentenced to jail on a first offense. The usual penalty is a $150 fine. In Hollywood, however, the norm for first-time prostitute convictions became a five-day sentence and three days in jail for their customers. The judges--ex-cop Harold N.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving firmly to take control of the O.J. Simpson civil suit, a Superior Court judge on Tuesday forbade all attorneys, witnesses and litigants to talk about the case for the duration of the trial. Judge Hiroshi Fujisaki's sweeping gag order suggests that the civil case against Simpson will be far tamer than the nine-month criminal trial, where lawyers sought to spin daily developments their way in a mad frenzy of dueling sound bites.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying he was troubled generally by "a lack of concern" for the rights of immigrants who face deportation, a federal district judge on Monday ruled that all portions of proceedings in U.S. immigration courts should be translated into the language of the defendants. Sandra Pettit, an attorney for the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles, called the decision significant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Monday morning, five hours before his date with the matter of Daryl F. Gates vs. the Board of Police Commissioners, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Ronald M. Sohigian stood at the courthouse escalators, talking to a prosecutor. Deputy Dist. Atty. Shirley Donoho had smiled when she saw him; here was a judge she had always liked and respected, and she told how she missed him now that he was handling cases outside her speciality. "He's a little bit on the shy side," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1991 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing a lack of "legal merit," a judge on Tuesday overturned a jury award of $3.8 million to black activist Michael Zinzun in a high-profile civil rights and defamation case against the city of Los Angeles and Assistant Police Chief Robert Vernon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court has reversed a controversial decision by a Los Angeles judge to expunge an Army reservist's criminal convictions so that he could accompany his unit to the Persian Gulf War. In a brief, unanimous decision made public Friday, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the decision of veteran U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk to annul the criminal record of James Patrick Smith, 45. At the hearing on Aug. 24, over the vigorous objections of federal prosecutor Stephen A.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2009 | Meg James
A federal judge in Los Angeles on Friday handed Univision Communications a major victory in its hard-fought battle with its programming partner from Mexico, underscoring Univision's exclusive rights in the U.S. to the wildly popular Spanish-language soap operas that fuel its huge ratings. Grupo Televisa, Mexico's largest entertainment company, had sought the judge's permission to transmit to U.S.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2005 | Myron Levin, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Monday reinstated a string of racketeering suits that charge chemical giant DuPont with hiding evidence about a widely used fungicide so it could settle crop-loss cases on the cheap. The ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals was a victory for six nursery operators in Hawaii and a setback for E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., which has paid $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2001 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A three-judge panel has concluded that the state Commission on Judicial Performance would have grounds to remove Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Patrick B. Murphy from the bench for misconduct that included attending a Caribbean medical school while on the judicial payroll. The three justices, who presided over a four-day hearing this year into Murphy's conduct, "found clear and convincing evidence" that he was excessively absent since 1996 and falsely claimed more than 400 sick days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2001 | TINA DAUNT and DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Concerned about his own role in overseeing Los Angeles police reform, a federal judge has so far declined to sign the federal consent decree on overhauling the LAPD because he wants clarification on a number of issues, including what say he will have in selecting an outside monitor to track the city's compliance with the decree. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Dianne Feinstein has recommended Jeffrey W. Johnson, a 39-year-old federal magistrate, to become a U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles. If nominated by President Clinton and confirmed by the Senate, Johnson would raise to four the number of African Americans serving on the Los Angeles-based District Court bench. About 30 judges are assigned to the district, which stretches from Orange County to San Luis Obispo County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A judge under investigation for calling in sick for most of the past year, while apparently registered part of the time as a medical student in the Caribbean, returned to work Monday. Los Angeles Superior Judge Patrick B. Murphy took the bench at the Metropolitan Courthouse near downtown Los Angeles, where he will hear traffic cases. Presiding Judge Victor Chavez reassigned Murphy to traffic court from the Citrus court in West Covina, where he heard criminal cases.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During Los Angeles County's historic voting rights trial, an attorney argued before U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon that the 1990s will produce a "different kind of Hispanic candidate . . . maybe even Republican, like Sarah Flores and Gaddi Vasquez." "Or . . . I just can't resist it," Kenyon interrupted, "(like) Supervisor Schabarum."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2001 | TINA DAUNT and DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Concerned about his own role in overseeing Los Angeles police reform, a federal judge has so far declined to sign the federal consent decree on overhauling the LAPD because he wants clarification on a number of issues, including what say he will have in selecting an outside monitor to track the city's compliance with the decree. U.S.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The U.S. Senate on Friday unanimously confirmed U.S. District Judge Kim M. Wardlaw of Los Angeles as a U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals judge. Wardlaw, 44, was nominated for the post by President Clinton in January, just 25 months after the Senate--at Clinton's recommendation--had confirmed Wardlaw for a seat on the District Court bench. U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) recommended Wardlaw for both posts and said she was "absolutely delighted."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' federal judges announced new disciplinary rules Thursday for lawyers who practice in their courtrooms, but questions arose over whether attorneys can be punished for making disparaging remarks about the jurists. The judges, who preside in the largest federal court district in the nation, provoked a storm of dissent within the legal community in January when they circulated a proposal that called for punishing lawyers who "impugn the character or integrity of any judicial officer."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|