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Judges Los Angeles County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1989 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Los Angeles County Municipal Court judges will receive a $3,600-a-year "professional development allowance" on top of their $77,409 annual salaries under a proposal to be voted on by the Board of Supervisors next Tuesday. With 178 Municipal Court judges allowed the county, the program would cost $640,800 a year. Six of the judgeships are now unfilled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Superior Court Judge George W. Trammell III pleaded guilty Wednesday to felony charges growing out of a sexual affair he had with a criminal defendant's wife. Trammell, who resigned from the bench after the sex scandal surfaced in 1997, faces up to 18 months in prison under a plea agreement reached with federal prosecutors. Appearing with his lawyers before U.S. District Judge A.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1992 | JEFF KRAMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Malibu Municipal Court judge was arrested Wednesday night near Agoura Hills on suspicion of drunk driving after running his car into a dirt embankment, the California Highway Patrol said Friday. Judge Lawrence Mira, 49, allegedly failed a field sobriety test after CHP officers responded to a one-car, non-injury accident at 11:10 p.m. on Cornell Road near Wagon Road in an unincorporated area of Los Angeles County.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | STEVE BERRY and TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Judges across California can only look in wonderment and envy at their brethren on the Los Angeles Superior Court. In this town, judges make so much that a promotion to a higher level would mean a pay cut. The reason: Los Angeles County officials allow the judges to draw duplicate benefits and perks from state and local taxes. As a result, the judges receive nearly $30,000 a year above their base salary of $118,000.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With quiet satisfaction, judges across Los Angeles County and the state Thursday welcomed back the power to change sentences in "three strikes" cases--a discretion that had been stifled under the 2-year-old law. But even as gleeful defense lawyers said that thousands of their clients sentenced statewide under the law could conceivably have their terms reviewed, judges said the streets will not abruptly be awash in freed convicts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A longtime Los Angeles Superior Court judge is under formal investigation on allegations that he appointed lawyers with whom he had personal or financial ties to represent criminal defendants in his court. The state Commission on Judicial Performance announced Monday that it has opened formal proceedings against Judge John Patrick Shook, 60.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1988 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
After 12 years on the bench, Superior Court Judge Roberta Ralph is under attack, challenged for reelection by a candidate rated "well qualified" by the Los Angeles County Bar Assn., while the Bar rates Ralph as only "qualified." Bar officials, however, will not explain why they decided to downgrade Ralph from the "well qualified" rating they gave her when she first ran to "qualified" this time, and her opponent, Encino attorney Harvey A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1998 | ELEANOR YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presiding judge of the Glendale Municipal Court on Friday dismissed a veteran court commissioner, who was investigated after complaints that she jailed dozens of minor traffic offenders on suspicion of perjury because she doubted the validity of their auto insurance verifications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has settled a civil suit alleging that he and others helped launder more than $1.8 million belonging to a wealthy physician friend, attorneys said Monday. Judge Patrick Murphy will pay no money toward the $525,000 settlement, but his sister, Barbara Parsons Murphy, who allegedly handled part of the missing money, will pay $145,000, said Tracy Green, Murphy's attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1995 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it "Catalina Law." Here in a one-room courthouse 26 miles across the sea, the bailiffs wear shorts, clerks greet residents by name, and the island's only judge hops out by copter or ferry for one day a week. Despite its sandal-clad informality, Catalina Municipal Court is a bustling outpost of law and order, where Judge Peter Mirich brings out all the accouterments of a courtroom--a prosecutor, a defense attorney, a court reporter--to dispense a day's worth of island justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL and PETER HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
All the candidate wanted to do was invite the judge to his party. But one man's gimmicky party invitation is another man's "suspicious package." And so it was that sheriff's arson investigators blew up district attorney candidate Steve Cooley's talking greeting card to Superior Court Judge Patrick T. Meyers in the parking lot of the Norwalk courthouse. Law enforcement types who neutralized the potential threat reported only that the packet had been "rendered safe." "I can confirm that Mr.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge Thursday suggested that the entire Los Angeles bench might have to be barred from presiding over the resolution of criminal charges against four police officers in the Rampart scandal. Judge Larry Fidler said he was prepared to disqualify all Los Angeles County judges from hearing the case. He noted that a former deputy district attorney, who is now a judge, is listed by the prosecution as a possible witness to acts allegedly committed by two of the four officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strongly worded opinion, a state appeals court criticized Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James M. Ideman, saying he committed "egregious" misconduct by repeatedly questioning defense witnesses in a disparaging manner during a drug trial. The court reversed the drug conviction and found that in his questioning, Ideman "took on the role of prosecutor rather than that of impartial judge."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has settled a civil suit alleging that he and others helped launder more than $1.8 million belonging to a wealthy physician friend, attorneys said Monday. Judge Patrick Murphy will pay no money toward the $525,000 settlement, but his sister, Barbara Parsons Murphy, who allegedly handled part of the missing money, will pay $145,000, said Tracy Green, Murphy's attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The state Commission on Judicial Performance has began formal proceedings against a Superior Court judge for his absence from his West Covina courtroom. Judge Patrick B. Murphy, 44, has not taken the bench at the Citrus Court since September, missed more than 157 days of work in 1999 on sick leave and has not indicated that he will return, commission officials said. A special judge will decide whether Murphy's absence amounts to a violation of the canons of judicial ethics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even as he continues to collect his $117,000-a-year salary while on sick leave, Citrus Court Judge Patrick B. Murphy has apparently enrolled as a first-year student in a Caribbean medical school, records and interviews show. Murphy took leave from his West Covina courtroom in late 1998 after allegations surfaced linking him to an alleged $1.8-million fraud.
NEWS
November 20, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case was chilling. A woman had been raped, then stabbed in the chest. The victim had lived to tell about it. And the jury of 12 had found the defendant guilty. Afterward, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Roosevelt Dorn retreated to his chambers to ponder the sentencing of this man whose criminal record began in his early teens. It was the kind of case that distressed the judge--another face that mirrored the failures of the juvenile justice system.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State authorities are investigating whether workers' compensation court judges in Orange and Los Angeles counties have been accepting expensive gifts from private attorneys and doctors whose clients' cases regularly appear before the court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former court commissioner who was fired during a controversy over her practice of jailing traffic court defendants she suspected of lying has sued the county, alleging that Presiding Glendale Municipal Judge James R. Simpson ordered her to fix traffic tickets for two friends. Dona Bracke, 46, made the allegations in a wrongful termination lawsuit. Simpson declined comment on advice of counsel. "I wish I could speak up, but my attorney told me not to," Simpson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former court commissioner who was fired during a controversy over her practice of jailing traffic court defendants she suspected of lying has sued the county, alleging presiding Glendale Municipal Court Judge James R. Simpson ordered her to fix traffic tickets for friends. Dona Bracke, 46, claimed in the wrongful-termination lawsuit that she was fired for refusing to fix traffic tickets for Simpson's friends and colleagues. Simpson declined comment on advice of counsel.
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