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NEWS
December 23, 1989 | LEE MAY and SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As authorities ended a frantic week of mail-bomb investigations in the Deep South, another device exploded here Friday, injuring a judge, the third attack on court officials in seven days. Washington County Circuit Judge John Printz Corderman, 47, was taken to a hospital, suffering from wounds to his groin and fingers after he opened a brown paper-wrapped package bomb that was left on the doorstep of his third-floor apartment in downtown Hagerstown.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Edward S. Northrop, 92, a former chief judge on the federal bench in Baltimore whose four decades of rulings included sentencing antiwar priest Philip F. Berrigan to prison, died Aug. 12 in a nursing home in Sandy Springs, Md. The cause of death was complications from an abdominal tumor. Born in Chevy Chase, Md., Northrop graduated from George Washington University and later from that university's law school.
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NEWS
December 26, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge injured by a bomb mailed to his home last week was well enough to leave Washington County Hospital on Christmas Day, but his destination was kept secret. Judge John Corderman, 47, was discharged under tight security after surgical removal of shrapnel from his abdomen was determined to be successful, officials said. "We do not know where the judge went," said Sheran White of the Hagerstown, Md., facility. "He said he would grant no interviews, at least today."
BUSINESS
May 22, 1997 | (Reuters)
A Maryland state judge ruled that the state's Medicaid suit against the tobacco industry may proceed to trial, but the ruling complicates the state's effort to secure the $13 billion in damages it is seeking. Deciding a motion to dismiss filed by the industry, Circuit Court Judge Robert Brown said the state's claims under the Maryland Consumer Protection Act and antitrust laws may go forward.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The package bomb that exploded in the hands of a Hagerstown, Md., judge is probably the work of a "copycat" who is not connected to those who sent four bombs from Georgia within the last two weeks, killing two people, federal officials said Saturday. The latest bombing victim, Washington County Circuit Court Judge John P. Corderman, 47, remained in stable condition and under armed guard at a local hospital Saturday after a pipe bomb exploded Friday afternoon at his apartment.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1997 | (Reuters)
A Maryland state judge ruled that the state's Medicaid suit against the tobacco industry may proceed to trial, but the ruling complicates the state's effort to secure the $13 billion in damages it is seeking. Deciding a motion to dismiss filed by the industry, Circuit Court Judge Robert Brown said the state's claims under the Maryland Consumer Protection Act and antitrust laws may go forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Edward S. Northrop, 92, a former chief judge on the federal bench in Baltimore whose four decades of rulings included sentencing antiwar priest Philip F. Berrigan to prison, died Aug. 12 in a nursing home in Sandy Springs, Md. The cause of death was complications from an abdominal tumor. Born in Chevy Chase, Md., Northrop graduated from George Washington University and later from that university's law school.
NEWS
December 29, 2002 | Matthew Mosk, Washington Post
On the air, he has played the delicate role of referee to Israelis and Palestinians. In the midst of South Africa's clash over apartheid, he brought Foreign Minister R.F. Botha and Archbishop Desmond Tutu into U.S. homes on the same television broadcast. But at home in Potomac, Md., where he is building a massive riverfront estate on 16 acres of cattle pasture, Ted Koppel is at war with his neighbors.
OPINION
June 9, 1991
For Carl A. Anderson, the more things change, the more they stay the same. His story typifies America's asbestos litigation disgrace: lots of action, but little movement. Anderson, 79, has already waited more than seven years for compensation for his advanced asbestosis, a lung disease caused by working around asbestos insulation products at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard for 30 years. Anderson is so short of breath now that he cannot walk more than a block or two.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge injured by a bomb mailed to his home last week was well enough to leave Washington County Hospital on Christmas Day, but his destination was kept secret. Judge John Corderman, 47, was discharged under tight security after surgical removal of shrapnel from his abdomen was determined to be successful, officials said. "We do not know where the judge went," said Sheran White of the Hagerstown, Md., facility. "He said he would grant no interviews, at least today."
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The package bomb that exploded in the hands of a Hagerstown, Md., judge is probably the work of a "copycat" who is not connected to those who sent four bombs from Georgia within the last two weeks, killing two people, federal officials said Saturday. The latest bombing victim, Washington County Circuit Court Judge John P. Corderman, 47, remained in stable condition and under armed guard at a local hospital Saturday after a pipe bomb exploded Friday afternoon at his apartment.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | LEE MAY and SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As authorities ended a frantic week of mail-bomb investigations in the Deep South, another device exploded here Friday, injuring a judge, the third attack on court officials in seven days. Washington County Circuit Judge John Printz Corderman, 47, was taken to a hospital, suffering from wounds to his groin and fingers after he opened a brown paper-wrapped package bomb that was left on the doorstep of his third-floor apartment in downtown Hagerstown.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They are a Baltimore prosecutor whose husband was appointed to the federal bench by Ronald Reagan, a renowned civil rights lawyer here who is legally blind, a veteran prosecutor who became the highest ranking African American in the Los Angeles district attorney's office, a Latino activist in Chicago who worked as a U.S. attorney and a Vermont Republican who was first chosen for the bench by George Bush.
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