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Judges Massachusetts

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NEWS
November 11, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before a tense, packed courtroom, Superior Court Judge Hiller Zobel on Monday reduced to manslaughter the murder conviction of British au pair Louise Woodward in the February death of 8-month-old Matthew Eappen. Then the judge set her free, reducing Woodward's sentence to time served, 279 days.
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NATIONAL
September 4, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Massachusetts prison officials must provide a publicly funded sex reassignment surgery to an inmate serving a life sentence for killing his wife, a federal judge in Boston ruled Tuesday. The decision , handed down by U.S. District Court Judge Mark Wolf, is believed to be the first such order by a judge in the nation, lawyer Frances S. Cohen of Bingham McCutchen LLP of Boston, said by telephone. Cohen is one of the attorneys representing Michelle Kosilek, who lives as a woman in an all-male prison.
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NEWS
December 17, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
According to federal sentencing guidelines, Alexander Leviner could have received four to six years in prison for possessing a gun and 14 rounds of ammunition. Instead, in a decision that may have national implications, U.S. District Judge Nancy Gertner of Boston handed Leviner a reduced sentence of just 2 1/2 years, citing her belief that his lengthy arrest record could be traced to police officers' habit of stopping black drivers more often than white drivers.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2002 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Paul Shanley, accused of shocking crimes in a sex abuse crisis that has rocked the Roman Catholic Church, pleaded not guilty Tuesday to three counts of child rape. Rejecting defense suggestions that Shanley is a harmless, 71-year-old man in "not the greatest of physical health," a judge ordered the Roman Catholic priest held on $750,000 cash bail.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Massachusetts prison officials must provide a publicly funded sex reassignment surgery to an inmate serving a life sentence for killing his wife, a federal judge in Boston ruled Tuesday. The decision , handed down by U.S. District Court Judge Mark Wolf, is believed to be the first such order by a judge in the nation, lawyer Frances S. Cohen of Bingham McCutchen LLP of Boston, said by telephone. Cohen is one of the attorneys representing Michelle Kosilek, who lives as a woman in an all-male prison.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Upjohn Co. has again beaten back legal claims that its sleep-inducing drug Halcion causes bizarre and sometimes violent behavior. But the company and some drug industry analysts said Thursday that they are skeptical about whether such victories will do much to change an image problem that has led to sinking sales. "It's very difficult to undo the story that gets implanted in people's minds when there's a whole string of negative media about the product," Upjohn spokeswoman Kaye Bennett said.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2002 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Paul Shanley, accused of shocking crimes in a sex abuse crisis that has rocked the Roman Catholic Church, pleaded not guilty Tuesday to three counts of child rape. Rejecting defense suggestions that Shanley is a harmless, 71-year-old man in "not the greatest of physical health," a judge ordered the Roman Catholic priest held on $750,000 cash bail.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2004 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
The House on Thursday rejected a proposed constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage but gave Republican leaders a consolation prize by putting lawmakers on record on an issue that will be used as campaign fodder in the November elections. The Marriage Protection Amendment, backed by President Bush, fell 49 votes short of the two-thirds majority required to begin the process of changing the Constitution. The vote was 227 for the amendment and 186 against.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2004 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
The successful efforts to amend 11 state constitutions to ban same-sex marriage has energized both sides of the highly contentious issue. Defenders of traditional marriage say voters' resounding support for state measures that limit marriage to a union between a man and a woman proves that a federal marriage amendment is inevitable.
NATIONAL
August 8, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
In a drive to challenge lenient judges, Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft says he wants to be alerted whenever a federal judge imposes a criminal sentence that is less than called for by U.S. guidelines. In a July 28 memo to U.S. attorneys' offices across the nation, Ashcroft said he had a "solemn obligation" to ensure that the laws setting punishments for federal crimes were "faithfully, fairly and consistently enforced."
NEWS
December 17, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
According to federal sentencing guidelines, Alexander Leviner could have received four to six years in prison for possessing a gun and 14 rounds of ammunition. Instead, in a decision that may have national implications, U.S. District Judge Nancy Gertner of Boston handed Leviner a reduced sentence of just 2 1/2 years, citing her belief that his lengthy arrest record could be traced to police officers' habit of stopping black drivers more often than white drivers.
NEWS
November 11, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before a tense, packed courtroom, Superior Court Judge Hiller Zobel on Monday reduced to manslaughter the murder conviction of British au pair Louise Woodward in the February death of 8-month-old Matthew Eappen. Then the judge set her free, reducing Woodward's sentence to time served, 279 days.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Upjohn Co. has again beaten back legal claims that its sleep-inducing drug Halcion causes bizarre and sometimes violent behavior. But the company and some drug industry analysts said Thursday that they are skeptical about whether such victories will do much to change an image problem that has led to sinking sales. "It's very difficult to undo the story that gets implanted in people's minds when there's a whole string of negative media about the product," Upjohn spokeswoman Kaye Bennett said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2004 | William Lobdell, Times Staff Writer
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, recently criticized by a national Catholic panel for his legal tactics in sexual abuse cases, received a vote of confidence this week from the Los Angeles Council of Priests, an elected body representing the Roman Catholic archdiocese's 850 clergymen.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Maura Dolan, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Four years ago, many gay rights advocates shook their heads when super-lawyers Theodore B. Olson and David Boies announced they would challenge California's ban on gay marriages in federal court and take the case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. It was too risky, the skeptics said. Voters in state after state were rejecting same-sex marriage, and no federal judge had said such bans were illegal. One liberal legal scholar called the lawsuit a "Hail Mary" pass. But now that Proposition 8's ban on gay marriage is set for a hearing Tuesday before the Supreme Court, the lawyers and activists who started the case think they may be on the verge of a historic victory.
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