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NEWS
January 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
A judge ruled Wednesday that a man may move his severely brain-damaged daughter out of a Missouri center and take her to Minnesota for further evaluation. Probate Judge Louis Kohn lifted a temporary order that blocked Pete Busalacchi from taking his 20-year-old daughter, Christine, to a Minnesota doctor and possibly removing her feeding tube. Minnesota law allows families and their doctors more leeway than Missouri law in deciding whether to cut life support to the severely disabled.
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NATIONAL
June 28, 2006 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Missouri has ordered a halt to all executions carried out by that state until it changes its lethal-injection procedures. The current system, U.S. District Judge Fernando J. Gaitan Jr. said in a Monday ruling, creates an unnecessary risk that an inmate could be subjected to "unconstitutional pain and suffering when the lethal-injection drugs are administered." He gave corrections officials until July 15 to come up with new procedures.
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NEWS
September 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
Nearly a year after the Senate rejected a state Supreme Court judge's nomination to a federal judgeship, the decision is reverberating in Missouri's Senate race. Democratic Gov. Mel Carnahan told a Missouri Bar Assn. forum on diversity that Judge Ronnie White was "one of my proudest appointments." Carnahan appointed him to the state Supreme Court in 1995, making him the court's first black judge. Carnahan's general election opponent, incumbent Republican Sen.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
Nearly a year after the Senate rejected a state Supreme Court judge's nomination to a federal judgeship, the decision is reverberating in Missouri's Senate race. Democratic Gov. Mel Carnahan told a Missouri Bar Assn. forum on diversity that Judge Ronnie White was "one of my proudest appointments." Carnahan appointed him to the state Supreme Court in 1995, making him the court's first black judge. Carnahan's general election opponent, incumbent Republican Sen.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2006 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Missouri has ordered a halt to all executions carried out by that state until it changes its lethal-injection procedures. The current system, U.S. District Judge Fernando J. Gaitan Jr. said in a Monday ruling, creates an unnecessary risk that an inmate could be subjected to "unconstitutional pain and suffering when the lethal-injection drugs are administered." He gave corrections officials until July 15 to come up with new procedures.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Joseph Paul Franklin, a racist who targeted African Americans, Jews and tried to assassinate Larry Flynt, the publisher of Hustler magazine, was executed Wednesday morning in Missouri, officials said. The execution came after Flynt, who has used a wheelchair since the 1978 attack, unsuccessfully pleaded for mercy for his assailant. It also came after a string of failed last-moment legal appeals delayed the execution by several hours. Technically, Franklin, who was executed at a state prison in Bonne Terre, Mo., went to his death for killing Gerald Gordon in a sniper attack on a St. Louis synagogue in 1977.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
A raft of recent court rulings yields encouraging, if preliminary and scattered, signs that the judiciary is getting fed up with efforts to narrow voting rights and other civil liberties and to undermine the Affordable Care Act. Some of these rulings come from judges with unassailable conservative credentials.  Here's a brief rundown.   -- Judges in Missouri and Washington, D.C., rejected attacks on the Affordable Care Act . In Missouri, Judge Ortrie D. Smith last week suspended parts of a Missouri law aimed at interfering with federal "navigators" -- people empowered under the ACA to help potential insurance customers find the best individual policies for themselves and to sign up for coverage.
NEWS
March 24, 2002 | MICHELLE BOORSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Ahmad and Sharifa Shaban married in 1974, the conditions they agreed to were standard for Cairo newlyweds: an oath that the bride was a virgin, a $30 dowry, and a declaration that the union was in accordance with "Almighty God's Holy Book." By the time the Shabans divorced 24 years later, the gastroenterologist and his wife were living in a posh Southern California neighborhood, had two kids and $3 million.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
A judge ruled Wednesday that a man may move his severely brain-damaged daughter out of a Missouri center and take her to Minnesota for further evaluation. Probate Judge Louis Kohn lifted a temporary order that blocked Pete Busalacchi from taking his 20-year-old daughter, Christine, to a Minnesota doctor and possibly removing her feeding tube. Minnesota law allows families and their doctors more leeway than Missouri law in deciding whether to cut life support to the severely disabled.
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