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NEWS
April 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The governor called on state Supreme Court Justice Peter G. Verniero to resign, accusing him of misleading senators about racial profiling at his confirmation hearing in 1999. "I believe the integrity of the process was violated," acting Gov. Donald T. DiFrancesco said. Evidence presented in six days of Senate hearings on racial profiling in the last two weeks showed Verniero was aware of racial profiling at least three years before he admitted it publicly, legislators charged.
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NEWS
April 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Former New Jersey Gov. Christie Whitman is defending her state Supreme Court nominee, saying he should resist legislators' calls for his resignation over the investigation of racial profiling by the state police.
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NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Associated Press
Estranged couples in one New Jersey county may have to wait until death does them part because of a shortage of judges. Beginning next month, divorce trials will be put on hold in Passaic County, according to an order issued last week by the county's assignment judge. He said an overloaded court calendar and six judicial vacancies were to blame. "We feel the matrimonial trial is probably the least important of all the things they do over there," Superior Court Judge Nicholas G.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The governor called on state Supreme Court Justice Peter G. Verniero to resign, accusing him of misleading senators about racial profiling at his confirmation hearing in 1999. "I believe the integrity of the process was violated," acting Gov. Donald T. DiFrancesco said. Evidence presented in six days of Senate hearings on racial profiling in the last two weeks showed Verniero was aware of racial profiling at least three years before he admitted it publicly, legislators charged.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Former New Jersey Gov. Christie Whitman is defending her state Supreme Court nominee, saying he should resist legislators' calls for his resignation over the investigation of racial profiling by the state police.
NEWS
September 20, 1986 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Asserting that workers have no "absolute expectation of privacy" that bars drug testing, the Justice Department on Friday defended the Boston Police Department's program of random urinalysis for officers and civilian employees.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
Verizon Wireless has won two legal skirmishes against telemarketers who made unwanted sales calls to its customers. The Bedminster, N.J.-based subsidiary of Verizon Communications Inc. said Thursday that judges in New Jersey and California had banned a telemarketer from using automatic dialers or prerecorded messages in calls to Verizon cellphone users. Verizon Wireless cited the federal Telephone Consumer Protection Act and state laws prohibiting such cellphone contacts.
SPORTS
June 13, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
The World Boxing Organization on Wednesday announced it has assigned five judges to re-score Manny Pacquiao's controversial loss by decision to Palm Springs' Timothy Bradley in an effort to convince state commissions to widen the pool of judges for major fights. Although many at ringside for Saturday's fight gave Pacquiao between nine and 11 rounds, judges Duane Ford and C.J. Ross scored the bout 115-113 (seven rounds to five) in Bradley's favor, and a third Nevada judge, Jerry Roth, had it 115-113 for Pacquiao in the WBO welterweight title contest.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former World War II prisoners of war and other activists stepped up their pressure against Japanese corporations in the United States, announcing Tuesday a nationwide class-action lawsuit alleging that the companies brutalized POWs and forced them to perform slave labor in Asia during the war. The lawsuit, part of an escalating U.S. offensive to win reparations for Japanese war crimes, targets five corporate giants: Mitsubishi International Corp., Mitsui & Co. (USA) Inc.
MAGAZINE
January 20, 1991 | Martin Kasindorf, Martin Kasindorf, a lawyer by training, is Los Angeles correspondent for Newsday
Except for the clatter of helicopters approaching the Tustin Marine Corps Air Station nearby, the world surrounding tiny Christopher Michael Calvert is a soothing lullaby. From his crib in a house on a safe cul-de-sac, the 4-month-old can see a leafy tract neighborhood beyond the backyard swimming pool. Cooed over by Crispina Calvert's family, the baby has almost too many loving relatives to count.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Associated Press
Estranged couples in one New Jersey county may have to wait until death does them part because of a shortage of judges. Beginning next month, divorce trials will be put on hold in Passaic County, according to an order issued last week by the county's assignment judge. He said an overloaded court calendar and six judicial vacancies were to blame. "We feel the matrimonial trial is probably the least important of all the things they do over there," Superior Court Judge Nicholas G.
NEWS
September 20, 1986 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Asserting that workers have no "absolute expectation of privacy" that bars drug testing, the Justice Department on Friday defended the Boston Police Department's program of random urinalysis for officers and civilian employees.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a move that will put further pressure on a group of German and American corporations to settle claims that they exploited slave labor during World War II, Gov. Gray Davis on Wednesday signed into law a bill that strengthens the hand of Holocaust survivors filing such cases in California. The measure, authored by state Sen.
NEWS
June 18, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of a national crackdown on sexual predators, the Supreme Court announced Monday that it will decide whether rapists and child molesters who are deemed dangerous can be kept in custody, even after they have completed their prison terms. A ruling, due next year, likely will determine the fate of new laws in California and five other states that allow the indefinite confinement of pedophiles and repeat rapists.
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