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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1990
In reply to your June 12 editorial "Protecting Even the Most Horrid": For obvious reasons, The Times seems to have no problem rallying for the rights guaranteed by the First Amendment, but on the question of the Second Amendment The Times has taken an anti-firearm, anti-NRA position, seemingly picking and choosing which rights are "right" and which are "wrong."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON-- A federal judge has ordered the battleground state of Ohio to open its polling places on the weekend and Monday prior to the Nov. 6 election, restoring the voting rules that were in effect in 2008,  when more than 93,000 early ballots were cast. The decision is a significant victory for the Obama campaign, which hopes for another large turnout in a state that is seen as crucial to both Republicans and Democrats. Obama's lawyers had sued Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted after he eliminated early voting on the weekends, including the three days before Election Day.  A former Republican legislator and Ohio House speaker, Husted said he wanted voting rules that were “uniform” across all 88 counties.
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NEWS
October 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
A jailed forger who appealed for probation so she could get an abortion was sent to prison by a judge who doesn't want the procedure done. "I'm saying that she is not having a second-term abortion," Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge Patricia Cleary said at Tuesday's sentencing hearing for Yuriko Kawaguchi, who is more than five months' pregnant. Kawaguchi, who pleaded guilty Aug.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - A federal judge in Ohio has blocked an unusual state election law that calls for throwing out thousands of provisional ballots that are cast in the wrong precinct, even when the voter goes to the right polling place. “The Constitution demands a safety net without holes,” said U.S. District Judge Algenon Marbley in ordering Ohio officials to count the ballots. The ruling arose from a voting rights lawsuit, one of several in Ohio and elsewhere, that seeks to resolve potentially crucial election rules prior to November.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A woman convicted of forgery who believes she was imprisoned to prevent her from having an abortion said she has decided to carry the pregnancy to term. Yuriko Kawaguchi, 21, is close to the deadline under Ohio law for having an abortion. Her attorney, Linda Rocker, said she plans to sue Cuyahoga County Judge Patricia Cleary. Rocker said Cleary violated Kawaguchi's right to have an abortion by sentencing her to six months in prison when most forgers would receive probation.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
A federal judge threw out the state's taxpayer-funded school voucher program Monday for violating the constitutional separation of church and state. But to avoid turmoil, he allowed students now in the program to remain in school. The expected ruling by U.S. District Judge Solomon Oliver Jr. made his earlier temporary order permanent. He said the program can continue running until appeals are decided.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A federal judge suspended Ohio's voter identification law Thursday as it applies to absentee voting, saying the state's 88 counties are inconsistently applying the rule in the voting, which is underway. U.S. District Judge Algenon Marbley granted the temporary restraining order on behalf of labor and poverty groups who sued this week.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON-- A federal judge has ordered the battleground state of Ohio to open its polling places on the weekend and Monday prior to the Nov. 6 election, restoring the voting rules that were in effect in 2008,  when more than 93,000 early ballots were cast. The decision is a significant victory for the Obama campaign, which hopes for another large turnout in a state that is seen as crucial to both Republicans and Democrats. Obama's lawyers had sued Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted after he eliminated early voting on the weekends, including the three days before Election Day.  A former Republican legislator and Ohio House speaker, Husted said he wanted voting rules that were “uniform” across all 88 counties.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - A federal judge in Ohio has blocked an unusual state election law that calls for throwing out thousands of provisional ballots that are cast in the wrong precinct, even when the voter goes to the right polling place. “The Constitution demands a safety net without holes,” said U.S. District Judge Algenon Marbley in ordering Ohio officials to count the ballots. The ruling arose from a voting rights lawsuit, one of several in Ohio and elsewhere, that seeks to resolve potentially crucial election rules prior to November.
SPORTS
November 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
An Ohio judge issued a preliminary injunction Friday, blocking the Browns from moving to Baltimore until a trial is held in the city's lawsuit. In a courtroom proceeding that lasted only five seconds, Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge Kenneth Callahan announced that he had ruled in favor of the city. Callahan heard three days of testimony earlier this week on the city's request for the injunction. Art Modell, the Browns' owner, announced Nov.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A federal judge suspended Ohio's voter identification law Thursday as it applies to absentee voting, saying the state's 88 counties are inconsistently applying the rule in the voting, which is underway. U.S. District Judge Algenon Marbley granted the temporary restraining order on behalf of labor and poverty groups who sued this week.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
A federal judge threw out the state's taxpayer-funded school voucher program Monday for violating the constitutional separation of church and state. But to avoid turmoil, he allowed students now in the program to remain in school. The expected ruling by U.S. District Judge Solomon Oliver Jr. made his earlier temporary order permanent. He said the program can continue running until appeals are decided.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A woman convicted of forgery who believes she was imprisoned to prevent her from having an abortion said she has decided to carry the pregnancy to term. Yuriko Kawaguchi, 21, is close to the deadline under Ohio law for having an abortion. Her attorney, Linda Rocker, said she plans to sue Cuyahoga County Judge Patricia Cleary. Rocker said Cleary violated Kawaguchi's right to have an abortion by sentencing her to six months in prison when most forgers would receive probation.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
A jailed forger who appealed for probation so she could get an abortion was sent to prison by a judge who doesn't want the procedure done. "I'm saying that she is not having a second-term abortion," Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge Patricia Cleary said at Tuesday's sentencing hearing for Yuriko Kawaguchi, who is more than five months' pregnant. Kawaguchi, who pleaded guilty Aug.
SPORTS
November 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
An Ohio judge issued a preliminary injunction Friday, blocking the Browns from moving to Baltimore until a trial is held in the city's lawsuit. In a courtroom proceeding that lasted only five seconds, Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge Kenneth Callahan announced that he had ruled in favor of the city. Callahan heard three days of testimony earlier this week on the city's request for the injunction. Art Modell, the Browns' owner, announced Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1990
In reply to your June 12 editorial "Protecting Even the Most Horrid": For obvious reasons, The Times seems to have no problem rallying for the rights guaranteed by the First Amendment, but on the question of the Second Amendment The Times has taken an anti-firearm, anti-NRA position, seemingly picking and choosing which rights are "right" and which are "wrong."
NATIONAL
June 28, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON -- Candidates who are seeking election as judges have a free-speech right to take stands on issues they may someday have to rule on, the Supreme Court said Thursday. Judges need to be open-minded, but they need not be empty-headed, said Justice Antonin Scalia, speaking for the 5-4 majority. ''It is virtually impossible to find a judge who does not have preconceptions about the law,'' Scalia said.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2004 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
As two federal judges in Ohio prepared to rule on lawsuits contending that the state's procedure for challenging an individual's right to vote is unconstitutional, the Justice Department weighed in with an unusual letter brief supporting the statute. Assistant Atty. Gen. R. Alexander Acosta sent a brief during the weekend to U.S. District Judge Susan J. Dlott, who held a rare Sunday night hearing in one of the cases, a lawsuit filed late last week by Donald and Marian Spencer.
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