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NEWS
July 31, 1998 | Associated Press
A judge who once jailed a man for swearing and slamming a courtroom door flew into a rage when a public defender was tardy and slammed his own courtroom door so hard that he shattered the glass window, witnesses said. Allegheny County Judge Donald Machen declined to comment. Maintenance crews had replaced the glass by Wednesday afternoon, but not before the broken pane drew a stream of lawyers to the fifth floor to see the damage.
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NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Pennsylvania's strict new photo ID requirement, which critics said could prevent tens of thousands of eligible voters from casting ballots, will not be enforced in the November election. A state judge blocked the new rule Tuesday after deciding state officials had failed to take steps to make sure all registered voters would be able to get the identification card they would need. "In the remaining five weeks before the general election, the gap between the photo IDs issued and the estimated need will not be closed," said Judge Robert Simpson.
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NEWS
April 10, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A justice on Pennsylvania's Supreme Court was convicted in Pittsburgh of two counts of conspiracy and acquitted of violating drug laws by having a doctor issue prescriptions for him in his employees' names. Justice Rolf Larsen, who had been next in line for the chief justice's position, gasped when he heard the verdict but showed no other reaction. He faces a maximum sentence of three years in prison and a $10,000 fine on each count.
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | Associated Press
A judge who once jailed a man for swearing and slamming a courtroom door flew into a rage when a public defender was tardy and slammed his own courtroom door so hard that he shattered the glass window, witnesses said. Allegheny County Judge Donald Machen declined to comment. Maintenance crews had replaced the glass by Wednesday afternoon, but not before the broken pane drew a stream of lawyers to the fifth floor to see the damage.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was, in the parlance of politics, a done deal. In the special election this fall to fill the U.S. Senate seat left vacant by the death of John Heinz (R-Pa.) in a plane crash last April, Democrats were going to run former state Industry and Labor Secretary Harris Wofford, who is serving as Heinz's interim successor. Republicans planned to put up U.S. Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, a popular former two-term Pennsylvania governor.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | Associated Press
A judge was sentenced Wednesday in his former courtroom to two to five years in prison for bribery and corruption. Cambria County Judge Joseph F. O'Kicki, 59, was stripped of his $80,000-per-year job and forfeits his state pension. Visiting Senior Judge Richard Grifo of Northampton County also imposed a $57,500 fine on O'Kicki. Among other offenses, O'Kicki was convicted of bullying aides and clerks into chopping wood.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | United Press International
President Reagan announced Tuesday he plans to nominate Herbert J. Hutton, a Philadelphia lawyer, to be U.S. district judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Pennsylvania's strict new photo ID requirement, which critics said could prevent tens of thousands of eligible voters from casting ballots, will not be enforced in the November election. A state judge blocked the new rule Tuesday after deciding state officials had failed to take steps to make sure all registered voters would be able to get the identification card they would need. "In the remaining five weeks before the general election, the gap between the photo IDs issued and the estimated need will not be closed," said Judge Robert Simpson.
NEWS
November 9, 1997 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On its face, the handwritten document that arrived at the United States Courthouse in Philadelphia the summer of 1996 looked to be an entirely futile affair. It was yet another petition for a writ of habeas corpus, filed by a convicted murderer seeking an order freeing her because she was illegally imprisoned. Federal courthouses receive thousands of such pleas each year from state prisoners; virtually all are rejected outright. This one--Lisa Michelle Lambert vs. Mrs. Charlotte Blackwell, Supt.
NEWS
November 10, 1997 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By midmorning on the first day of Lisa Michelle Lambert's federal habeas corpus hearing, U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell already could be seen displaying alarm over what he was hearing. From the lawyers' briefs alone, he'd read enough to persuade him to grant Lisa's request for this uncommon federal review of a state murder conviction.
NEWS
November 10, 1997 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By midmorning on the first day of Lisa Michelle Lambert's federal habeas corpus hearing, U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell already could be seen displaying alarm over what he was hearing. From the lawyers' briefs alone, he'd read enough to persuade him to grant Lisa's request for this uncommon federal review of a state murder conviction.
NEWS
November 9, 1997 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On its face, the handwritten document that arrived at the United States Courthouse in Philadelphia the summer of 1996 looked to be an entirely futile affair. It was yet another petition for a writ of habeas corpus, filed by a convicted murderer seeking an order freeing her because she was illegally imprisoned. Federal courthouses receive thousands of such pleas each year from state prisoners; virtually all are rejected outright. This one--Lisa Michelle Lambert vs. Mrs. Charlotte Blackwell, Supt.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A justice on Pennsylvania's Supreme Court was convicted in Pittsburgh of two counts of conspiracy and acquitted of violating drug laws by having a doctor issue prescriptions for him in his employees' names. Justice Rolf Larsen, who had been next in line for the chief justice's position, gasped when he heard the verdict but showed no other reaction. He faces a maximum sentence of three years in prison and a $10,000 fine on each count.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was, in the parlance of politics, a done deal. In the special election this fall to fill the U.S. Senate seat left vacant by the death of John Heinz (R-Pa.) in a plane crash last April, Democrats were going to run former state Industry and Labor Secretary Harris Wofford, who is serving as Heinz's interim successor. Republicans planned to put up U.S. Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, a popular former two-term Pennsylvania governor.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | Associated Press
A judge was sentenced Wednesday in his former courtroom to two to five years in prison for bribery and corruption. Cambria County Judge Joseph F. O'Kicki, 59, was stripped of his $80,000-per-year job and forfeits his state pension. Visiting Senior Judge Richard Grifo of Northampton County also imposed a $57,500 fine on O'Kicki. Among other offenses, O'Kicki was convicted of bullying aides and clerks into chopping wood.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | United Press International
President Reagan announced Tuesday he plans to nominate Herbert J. Hutton, a Philadelphia lawyer, to be U.S. district judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON -- A divided Senate Judiciary Committee approved President Bush's choice of a Pennsylvania judge for a U.S. Court of Appeals seat Thursday, as three Democrats broke ranks to vote in favor of the nomination. U.S. District Judge D. Brooks Smith, 50, was appointed to the federal bench by President Reagan.
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