Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudges Russia
IN THE NEWS

Judges Russia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valery Zorkin, the august chairman of Russia's Constitutional Court, was practically tearing his hair. "The court is forced to ask you: Do you have a coordinator for your case or don't you?" he exclaimed, looking over his glasses in exasperation at a Communist Party legal expert. "Your team has contradicted itself three times now! "It's not just the chairman saying this, but the other judges, as well," he added. "And it's not just the court saying this but simple logic!"
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A family of Russian descent seeking return of property seized after the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution won a $234-million judgment against Russia. U.S. District Judge David Hittner in Houston awarded the damages after Russia failed to defend itself. Lee Magness' claim was based on his family's vast holdings in St. Petersburg, Russia, including a piano factory, a shopping center and a mansion. All were absorbed by the communists after the 1917 revolution.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign that Russia's dangerous political winds may now be blowing at President Boris N. Yeltsin's back, the chairman of Russia's Constitutional Court on Monday cautiously endorsed the proposed new constitution for a post-Communist Russia. "I am in favor of a strong executive power," said Valery D. Zorkin, subtly distancing himself from Yeltsin's archrival, Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign that Russia's dangerous political winds may now be blowing at President Boris N. Yeltsin's back, the chairman of Russia's Constitutional Court on Monday cautiously endorsed the proposed new constitution for a post-Communist Russia. "I am in favor of a strong executive power," said Valery D. Zorkin, subtly distancing himself from Yeltsin's archrival, Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A family of Russian descent seeking return of property seized after the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution won a $234-million judgment against Russia. U.S. District Judge David Hittner in Houston awarded the damages after Russia failed to defend itself. Lee Magness' claim was based on his family's vast holdings in St. Petersburg, Russia, including a piano factory, a shopping center and a mansion. All were absorbed by the communists after the 1917 revolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992 | JERRY F. HOUGH, Jerry F. Hough is director of the Center on East-West Trade, Investment and Communications at Duke University and a senior fellow of the Brookings Institution
Americans, absorbed in their own politics for the last six months, may be alarmed by the latest news reports from Moscow. However, the course of events in the former Soviet Union is far more orderly and even more hopeful than it seems. No one of importance in Moscow is trying to overthrow Boris Yeltsin. He is not an American President with his own Cabinet, but more like a French president, with a prime minister in charge of the cabinet.
SPORTS
February 19, 2002 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another figure skating gold medal was decided by a 5-4 margin Monday. But unlike the controversial pairs final, the ice dance final stirred no complaints about judging conspiracies at the Salt Lake Ice Center. Marina Anissina and Gwendal Peizerat of France, whose "Liberta" free dance program contained excerpts from Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech, edged Irina Lobacheva and Ilia Averbukh of Russia to win the first Olympic ice dance gold medal awarded to French athletes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2002 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials at the first Rachmaninoff International Competition and Festival wanted to avoid controversy. But one landed in their laps anyway when, in announcing top honors Friday at Pasadena Civic Auditorium, the judges disqualified Alessio Cioni, 23, of Italy from the final round. "With regret," they declared in a statement, "it is the unanimous decision of the jury that Mr.
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delivering a sweeping indictment of 70 years of Communist rule, President Boris N. Yeltsin's top lawyer urged a special court Wednesday to uphold Yeltsin's ban on the party that became "the most powerful organization of the 20th Century." The lawyer, Sergei M. Shakhrai, ran through a devastating list of party crimes ranging from the mass slaughter of private farmers to the invasion of Afghanistan, the repression of dissidents and the plotting of last August's coup attempt.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Lies! Arrogant lies! Lies and slander!" When, at long last, former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev took the stand Thursday to set the record straight on the 1991 Kremlin coup attempt, his main message--publicly under oath for the first time--was a disgusted denial that he had collaborated with the plotters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992 | JERRY F. HOUGH, Jerry F. Hough is director of the Center on East-West Trade, Investment and Communications at Duke University and a senior fellow of the Brookings Institution
Americans, absorbed in their own politics for the last six months, may be alarmed by the latest news reports from Moscow. However, the course of events in the former Soviet Union is far more orderly and even more hopeful than it seems. No one of importance in Moscow is trying to overthrow Boris Yeltsin. He is not an American President with his own Cabinet, but more like a French president, with a prime minister in charge of the cabinet.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valery Zorkin, the august chairman of Russia's Constitutional Court, was practically tearing his hair. "The court is forced to ask you: Do you have a coordinator for your case or don't you?" he exclaimed, looking over his glasses in exasperation at a Communist Party legal expert. "Your team has contradicted itself three times now! "It's not just the chairman saying this, but the other judges, as well," he added. "And it's not just the court saying this but simple logic!"
SPORTS
March 27, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Venus and Serena Williams--sisters, best friends and doubles partners--now find themselves foes in an unprecedented family final. With their beaded braids clacking and their forehands crackling, the precocious teenagers scored an impressive sweep Friday in the semifinals of the Lipton Championships at Key Biscayne, Fla. Serena, 17, came from behind in both sets to beat top-ranked Martina Hingis of Switzerland, 6-4, 7-6 (7-3).
SPORTS
February 12, 2002 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian dynasty in Olympic pairs figure skating lives on, albeit with a little help from training facilities in New Jersey and a controversial decision by the judges. Elena Berezhnaya and Anton Sikharulidze, who train in Hackensack, edged world champions Jamie Sale and David Pelletier of Canada by a 5-4 margin in the long program Monday to win the 11th consecutive Olympic gold medal for Soviet or Russian pair skaters.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|