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NEWS
May 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President-elect Cesar Gaviria wants to create special courts modeled on Italian anti-Mafia tribunals and provide heavy security for judges to hear drug cases involving Colombia's powerful cocaine cartels. Gaviria, who was elected Sunday, has promised a tough war on drug traffickers after he takes office in August.
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NATIONAL
March 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Ailing Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presided over a meeting of federal judges who implored Congress and the Bush administration to improve judicial security after two fatal shootings. The Judicial Conference of the United States, the policymaking body of the federal judiciary, approved a resolution asking the Justice Department and U.S. Marshals Service to devise ways to bolster security, particularly at judges' homes.
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NEWS
August 2, 1989
Colombia, where more than 50 judges have been killed in the last decade, said it will increase its protection of the judiciary. Police Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez told reporters in Bogota, the capital, that judges handling sensitive cases will be given offices inside bases of the national police and the elite state security department. His pledge came after about 18,000 judges and judicial officials went on strike to press for more protection after the recent gangland-style slaying of a colleague.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1999 | From Reuters
A government expert testified at Microsoft Corp.'s antitrust trial Thursday that the company's design of Windows 98 had the potential for security risks. The issue revolved around Microsoft's built-in Web browser, which cannot be removed, although some corporate customers would like to do so. "Are there any security issues involved in the choice of a browser or whether to get a browser at all?" U.S.
NEWS
September 25, 1989
Proposals to dispose of trash by rail transportation to landfill sites in the Southern California desert make more sense than others previously mentioned, including local incineration, waste separation and recycling. There is virtually an unlimited capacity in the desert for such disposal, and the fact of an ever increasing amount of trash, and the running out of local landfill sites make the adoption of this plan both imperative and inevitable.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Colombian judges ended a 13-day strike after winning a government pledge of better protection in the war against drug barons. Judges who have received retaliatory death threats were promised 345 bullet-proof vests, 50 armored cars and two motorcycles, a judicial association official said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1996 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Dist. Judge Gary L. Taylor, allegedly targeted for assassination by a former professional football player convicted in his court of cocaine trafficking, has disqualified himself from the case. Taylor said new allegations that former Ram cornerback Darryl Henley had arranged to kill him would raise questions about the fairness of the judge's rulings.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | from Associated Press
Supreme Court justices have used the court's security force to provide taxi service for visiting relatives, work overtime at wedding receptions and push supermarket carts. Such assignments have sparked resentment and led to a policy aimed at curtailing abuses, the Associated Press has learned. The 80-member police force represents about one-fourth of the high court's total employees.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Ailing Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presided over a meeting of federal judges who implored Congress and the Bush administration to improve judicial security after two fatal shootings. The Judicial Conference of the United States, the policymaking body of the federal judiciary, approved a resolution asking the Justice Department and U.S. Marshals Service to devise ways to bolster security, particularly at judges' homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996
A panel of Superior Court judges is calling for a $2.4-million system of alarms, closed-circuit cameras, metal detectors and guards to protect the sprawling downtown Los Angeles civil court building in the wake of a fatal shooting there last year. Endorsed by a committee of high-ranking Superior Court judges, the plan recommends hiring 43 more security guards. It comes as an increasing number of overflow cases from the criminal courthouse are being funneled to the North Hill Street facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996
A panel of Superior Court judges is calling for a $2.4-million system of alarms, closed-circuit cameras, metal detectors and guards to protect the sprawling downtown Los Angeles civil court building in the wake of a fatal shooting there last year. Endorsed by a committee of high-ranking Superior Court judges, the plan recommends hiring 43 more security guards. It comes as an increasing number of overflow cases from the criminal courthouse are being funneled to the North Hill Street facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1996 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Dist. Judge Gary L. Taylor, allegedly targeted for assassination by a former professional football player convicted in his court of cocaine trafficking, has disqualified himself from the case. Taylor said new allegations that former Ram cornerback Darryl Henley had arranged to kill him would raise questions about the fairness of the judge's rulings.
NEWS
September 15, 1994
An administrative law judge has ruled that the firing of former Pasadena Unified School District security chief Charles Parcell was excessive and that Parcell should be given back his job. In his Sept. 8 ruling, Administrative Law Judge Richard Ranger stated that Parcell should have been suspended for 90 days for allegedly filing a false police report in September, 1992, but should not have been fired. "This case should have been avoided," Ranger wrote in his final ruling.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | from Associated Press
Supreme Court justices have used the court's security force to provide taxi service for visiting relatives, work overtime at wedding receptions and push supermarket carts. Such assignments have sparked resentment and led to a policy aimed at curtailing abuses, the Associated Press has learned. The 80-member police force represents about one-fourth of the high court's total employees.
NEWS
May 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President-elect Cesar Gaviria wants to create special courts modeled on Italian anti-Mafia tribunals and provide heavy security for judges to hear drug cases involving Colombia's powerful cocaine cartels. Gaviria, who was elected Sunday, has promised a tough war on drug traffickers after he takes office in August.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Colombian judges ended a 13-day strike after winning a government pledge of better protection in the war against drug barons. Judges who have received retaliatory death threats were promised 345 bullet-proof vests, 50 armored cars and two motorcycles, a judicial association official said.
NEWS
September 15, 1994
An administrative law judge has ruled that the firing of former Pasadena Unified School District security chief Charles Parcell was excessive and that Parcell should be given back his job. In his Sept. 8 ruling, Administrative Law Judge Richard Ranger stated that Parcell should have been suspended for 90 days for allegedly filing a false police report in September, 1992, but should not have been fired. "This case should have been avoided," Ranger wrote in his final ruling.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Colombia's Justice Minister Monica de Greiff today vowed to continue to fight her country's drug lords despite death threats, and she appealed for more U.S. aid to protect judges. "The law is under siege in Colombia and we must protect it every way we can," she told a news conference at the Colombian Embassy. She disputed reports that she had considered resigning in the face of death threats against her, her husband and the couple's 3-year-old son. "I never considered resigning," she said.
NEWS
September 25, 1989
Proposals to dispose of trash by rail transportation to landfill sites in the Southern California desert make more sense than others previously mentioned, including local incineration, waste separation and recycling. There is virtually an unlimited capacity in the desert for such disposal, and the fact of an ever increasing amount of trash, and the running out of local landfill sites make the adoption of this plan both imperative and inevitable.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Colombia's Justice Minister Monica de Greiff today vowed to continue to fight her country's drug lords despite death threats, and she appealed for more U.S. aid to protect judges. "The law is under siege in Colombia and we must protect it every way we can," she told a news conference at the Colombian Embassy. She disputed reports that she had considered resigning in the face of death threats against her, her husband and the couple's 3-year-old son. "I never considered resigning," she said.
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