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NEWS
September 13, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sordid saga of a Tennessee judge who sexually assaulted at least five women in his chambers has taken another strange twist, descending from a high-level dispute about the reach of federal law to a national manhunt for a criminal on the run. Portly ex-judge David W. Lanier, who was freed by one federal court but sent back to prison by the U.S. Supreme Court, has disappeared. This week, the U.S. Marshal's Service issued a "Wanted" poster for his arrest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Odell Horton, 77, the first black federal judge and assistant U.S. attorney in Tennessee since Reconstruction, died of respiratory failure Wednesday at a Memphis retirement home, said Evie Horton, his wife of 52 years. A native of Bolivar, Tenn., Horton became a U.S. district judge in western Tennessee after being nominated by President Carter and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 1980. Horton was the oldest of five children. His first job was delivering laundry at age 6 for his mother.
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NEWS
February 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge in Chattanooga, Tenn., who released a rape suspect last week saying he should get a girlfriend, reconsidered and had the man jailed. Vincent Cousin was ordered held pending a March 9 hearing after dozens of people called to complain, Judge Doug Meyer said. Cousin was arrested on a rape charge in 1989 but was found innocent by reason of insanity.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge whose rulings gave hope to James Earl Ray that he would get a trial in the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. was removed from the case for appearing biased toward the convicted killer. During the past four years, Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown has ruled on various petitions filed by Ray in his decades-old attempt to take back his guilty plea to killing King in Memphis in 1968.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | Associated Press
A judge convicted of violating the civil rights of five women by sexually assaulting them in his courthouse had his bail revoked Friday for allegedly trying to get his accusers to change their testimony. Judge David Lanier, 58, of Dyersburg had been free on $20,000 unsecured bond pending his sentencing, set for March 26. He was under a court order since his December conviction not to contact his accusers or other witnesses. Assistant U.S. Atty. Steve Parker told U.S.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge whose rulings gave hope to James Earl Ray that he would get a trial in the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. was removed from the case for appearing biased toward the convicted killer. During the past four years, Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown has ruled on various petitions filed by Ray in his decades-old attempt to take back his guilty plea to killing King in Memphis in 1968.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a partial victory for federal prosecutors, the Supreme Court overturned a controversial ruling that freed a Tennessee judge who had sexually assaulted at least five women in his chambers. But the justices stopped short of sending the judge back to prison. Instead, they ordered a lower court to reconsider the matter. Apparently, the justices could not agree among themselves on a clear ruling and decided to give the lower court a second chance to get it right.
NEWS
February 21, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racing against death, James Earl Ray's efforts to reopen an investigation into the murder of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. inched forward Thursday, helped along by testimony from the civil rights leader's widow and son. But while Ray's attorney hailed a judge's ruling that kept alive hopes the convicted assassin will be granted a trial, all concerned acknowledged the possibility that the gravely ill Ray will not live long enough to see a resolution to the case.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
A judge was convicted Friday of violating the civil rights of five women by sexually assaulting them at his small-town courthouse. Chancery Judge David Lanier showed no emotion as the verdict was read in U.S. District Court. He refused comment as he left the courtroom with his arms around one of his daughters and his former wife. Lanier, 58, of Dyersburg in northwest Tennessee, was convicted of twice forcing a woman to perform oral sex in his office.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More photographs purporting to show that American servicemen who vanished during the Vietnam War are still alive have surfaced, raising new questions about the government's handling of the emotional POW-MIA issue as Washington prepares for new hearings on the subject. A controversial Orange County-based POW-MIA researcher contends that some photographs he obtained from a Laotian source last year show that an Army Special Forces member who disappeared July 6, 1971, is still alive.
NEWS
September 13, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sordid saga of a Tennessee judge who sexually assaulted at least five women in his chambers has taken another strange twist, descending from a high-level dispute about the reach of federal law to a national manhunt for a criminal on the run. Portly ex-judge David W. Lanier, who was freed by one federal court but sent back to prison by the U.S. Supreme Court, has disappeared. This week, the U.S. Marshal's Service issued a "Wanted" poster for his arrest.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a partial victory for federal prosecutors, the Supreme Court overturned a controversial ruling that freed a Tennessee judge who had sexually assaulted at least five women in his chambers. But the justices stopped short of sending the judge back to prison. Instead, they ordered a lower court to reconsider the matter. Apparently, the justices could not agree among themselves on a clear ruling and decided to give the lower court a second chance to get it right.
NEWS
February 21, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racing against death, James Earl Ray's efforts to reopen an investigation into the murder of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. inched forward Thursday, helped along by testimony from the civil rights leader's widow and son. But while Ray's attorney hailed a judge's ruling that kept alive hopes the convicted assassin will be granted a trial, all concerned acknowledged the possibility that the gravely ill Ray will not live long enough to see a resolution to the case.
NEWS
February 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge in Chattanooga, Tenn., who released a rape suspect last week saying he should get a girlfriend, reconsidered and had the man jailed. Vincent Cousin was ordered held pending a March 9 hearing after dozens of people called to complain, Judge Doug Meyer said. Cousin was arrested on a rape charge in 1989 but was found innocent by reason of insanity.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | Associated Press
A judge convicted of violating the civil rights of five women by sexually assaulting them in his courthouse had his bail revoked Friday for allegedly trying to get his accusers to change their testimony. Judge David Lanier, 58, of Dyersburg had been free on $20,000 unsecured bond pending his sentencing, set for March 26. He was under a court order since his December conviction not to contact his accusers or other witnesses. Assistant U.S. Atty. Steve Parker told U.S.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
A judge was convicted Friday of violating the civil rights of five women by sexually assaulting them at his small-town courthouse. Chancery Judge David Lanier showed no emotion as the verdict was read in U.S. District Court. He refused comment as he left the courtroom with his arms around one of his daughters and his former wife. Lanier, 58, of Dyersburg in northwest Tennessee, was convicted of twice forcing a woman to perform oral sex in his office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Odell Horton, 77, the first black federal judge and assistant U.S. attorney in Tennessee since Reconstruction, died of respiratory failure Wednesday at a Memphis retirement home, said Evie Horton, his wife of 52 years. A native of Bolivar, Tenn., Horton became a U.S. district judge in western Tennessee after being nominated by President Carter and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in 1980. Horton was the oldest of five children. His first job was delivering laundry at age 6 for his mother.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1985
The Tennessee financier, still facing bankruptcy after the collapse of his two-state banking empire, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in London, Ky., to a third series of bank fraud charges. Butcher, who previously entered guilty pleas before federal judges in Tennessee, had been accused in Kentucky of defrauding former United American Banks in Lexington and Somerset by siphoning off $4.2 million for business and personal expenses.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More photographs purporting to show that American servicemen who vanished during the Vietnam War are still alive have surfaced, raising new questions about the government's handling of the emotional POW-MIA issue as Washington prepares for new hearings on the subject. A controversial Orange County-based POW-MIA researcher contends that some photographs he obtained from a Laotian source last year show that an Army Special Forces member who disappeared July 6, 1971, is still alive.
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